Estate Planning

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2022

Hiring an attorney to write a will might seem like a lot of effort and money. 

Isn't it easier to plop down, put on the camera, and film yourself stating your preferences for who should inherit your belongings or act as guardians for your kids?

It may be simpler, but it might not result in a legitimate will. 

In most cases, a will must be written and signed to be legitimate. Most states require a will to be dated and witnessed by two people who saw you sign it and may subsequently testify that you looked to be of sound mind and acted of your own free will.

Unless your video will is written down, signed, and witnessed, it probably won’t be legally binding. 

However, even if it isn't a legally valid will by itself, a video recording may be a handy tool when creating a will, particularly if you're worried about someone challenging your will after you die. 

It may also comfort your loved ones, for instance, if you wished to explain why you decided to leave your possessions in the manner you did.

In this article, you will learn more about the legitimacy of a video will and creating a valid will.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Video wills are recorded declarations of a person's wishes for distributing their assets and can provide evidence of sound mind and intent in estate planning.

  2. Video wills should only be used as a supplement to a formal, legally binding paper will, as state laws and guidelines must still be followed.

  3. A living trust only covers property transferred in writing and cannot handle certain tasks such as naming a guardian or forgiving debts, whereas a will can.

What Exactly Are Video Wills?

Video wills are exactly what the name implies: filmed declarations of the testator stating their wishes for allocating their estate's assets

These intentions often contain a description of assets, the beneficiaries to whom they will be distributed, and the name of an executor who will administer the estate through probate

Getting the Will-Signing Ceremony on Video

Woman signing document

Videotaping the will-signing ceremony or reading the will out loud on video might be beneficial for several reasons.

A video will may prevent allegations that you were under the influence of alcohol or drugs when you signed your will. 

If you believe the provisions of your will could anger a close family member to the point that they may hire an attorney and fight your will in probate court, you need to take measures to prevent that unpleasant scenario. 

Making a video of you and your witnesses signing your will is a handy strategy in these situations.

If the video shows that you are reasonable, understand the terms of your will, and are using the will to communicate your own intentions (rather than someone else's), it will go a long way toward preventing someone from suing later—or beating a claim if someone does challenge your will.

Someone attempting to contest a will must provide convincing proof that you were unaware of who your nearest family members were, were unaware of what you possessed, or were improperly influenced by someone seeking to benefit. 

A video of you explaining your actions or behaving freely and autonomously might assist in disproving such allegations.

A video of the will signing ceremony may demonstrate that you carried out the will appropriately. 

Your will is only legal if you sign it per the formalities established by your state's law. 

In some states, there must be two (or more) adult witnesses present, you must inform them that the paper is your last will and testament, and they must sign it. 

Many states need you and the witnesses to sign the paperwork in the same room. 

A video of the witnesses watching you sign and subsequently signing the will for themselves is good evidence to have in the event of a dispute.

Explaining or Adding to Your Estate Plan

Damaged feelings and disagreements are sometimes the outcomes of a surprise in a will or trust. 

For instance, if children anticipate getting equal parts of their parents' inheritance but do not, or if a more distant family member receives a greater share at the cost of a child, there may be conflict.

You do not have to explain your decisions—your belongings are yours to do with as you wish—but a recording can be a simple and effective way to do so. 

For instance, if you wish to leave a larger portion of your assets to one of your kids because you've already given the others cash to help them purchase homes, or if you want one kid to act as executor, you should specify this. 

With a video will, your children will not be kept in the dark about your behavior, which may avoid some arguing.

The Benefits and Drawbacks of a Video Will


Let's look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of a video will.

Benefits:

A video will might help you avoid accusations that you were not of sound mind or were unfairly influenced when you signed your will. 

A video will be useful if someone is dissatisfied with your will and chooses to employ a lawyer to fight it. 

The film may also include footage of you and your witnesses signing your will. In such an instance, it proves that you were rational, aware of the contents of your will, and expressed your intentions.

A video may be used to enhance your formal estate plan. A video will, for example, allow you to name one of your children as executor. 

If you wish to go into further detail, a video might convey how you want your family to divide up precious goods.

Drawbacks: 

Although you may use your video will to specify how your family should disperse treasured belongings, your desires are not legally binding. 

That is, your video will not be accepted by a probate court, a bank, or any other organization with assets under your name. 

Only a formal paper will is legally binding.

Videos do not stick around forever and are, therefore, susceptible to damage or deletion.

If you choose a video will, think of it as an addition to a formal, legal paper will prepared by an estate planning attorney, and keep the following guidelines in mind:

  1. Make use of a high-quality camera that can clearly identify your face.

  2. Speak clearly and loudly, with as little background noise as possible.

  3. Maintain a medium close-up on the video-captured region.

  4. The video cannot be modified and must include any technical data required to play it again.

  5. Some states require you to be sworn in by someone legally authorized to administer oaths.

  6. Any court officials must identify themselves on camera before delivering the oath.

  7. Before relaying your final desires and the recorded names of your beneficiaries, mention the recording's date, time, and location, as well as the names and addresses of the will's witnesses if they are not present at the taping.

  8. The video should continue uninterrupted.

Finally, remember that a will, whether written or recorded, is not your sole estate planning option. Various trusts may also assist in ensuring that your fortune is distributed following your preferences.

A living trust is a legal document in which you leave your property to whomever you choose. 

The benefit of a living trust is that property assigned through a trust doesn't have to go through probate after you die, saving your family lots of money and time.

But even if you create a living trust, you should still have a will. 

A Living Trust Will Never Include Everything You Own

One important reason to prepare a will is that a living trust only protects property you have transferred to the trust in writing. 

Very few people give their whole estate to a trust. 

Even if you meticulously transfer everything, there's always the possibility that you'll acquire property just before you die. It will only pass under the trust's provisions if you think to (or are unable to) transfer ownership to your living trust.

A Will Can Do Things That A Trust Cannot

A will can do several vital tasks that a living trust cannot. 

For example, in many jurisdictions, naming a guardian for young children—someone to raise them if you and the other parent die before they reach adulthood—requires the use of a will. You are unable to utilize your living trust. 

A will may also be used to forgive (cancel) debts due to you, something a trust agreement cannot accomplish.

What are Nuncupative Wills?

Portrait of elderly man

It is worth mentioning that only a few states permit oral wills (also known as nuncupative wills).

Nuncupative wills are sometimes known as deathbed wills. This refers to circumstances in which the testator communicates their bequests and intentions to witnesses, generally because they do not have the chance to prepare a written will. 

A video will might be acceptable in places that recognize nuncupative wills if it fits all of the other conditions of the state legislation.

These conditions, however, are often quite restricted and detailed and normally demand that the testator dies within a certain amount of time after drafting their spoken will. While it is feasible, meeting all regulatory criteria, including the time limits, would be tough. 

The video will is more likely to be used as a backup or complement to a written will, proving that the testator was rational and free of influence.

Suggestions

Consult an attorney if you are contemplating a video will since state rules might change to reflect trends. 

A video should only support your written will, which should always qualify as legal. 

An attorney can update you on any changes in state law and ensure that your will is drafted correctly. 

How Can Trustworthy Help?

Trustworthy can help you keep your will and living trust documents safe. 

When you sign up for Trustworthy, you get access to a secure server where you can upload and share your important estate planning documents. Your family and friends will never have to worry about the location of your paper documents when they can easily access them online.

Save your family time and money in the event of your passing by registering for a free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Estate Planning

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2022

Hiring an attorney to write a will might seem like a lot of effort and money. 

Isn't it easier to plop down, put on the camera, and film yourself stating your preferences for who should inherit your belongings or act as guardians for your kids?

It may be simpler, but it might not result in a legitimate will. 

In most cases, a will must be written and signed to be legitimate. Most states require a will to be dated and witnessed by two people who saw you sign it and may subsequently testify that you looked to be of sound mind and acted of your own free will.

Unless your video will is written down, signed, and witnessed, it probably won’t be legally binding. 

However, even if it isn't a legally valid will by itself, a video recording may be a handy tool when creating a will, particularly if you're worried about someone challenging your will after you die. 

It may also comfort your loved ones, for instance, if you wished to explain why you decided to leave your possessions in the manner you did.

In this article, you will learn more about the legitimacy of a video will and creating a valid will.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Video wills are recorded declarations of a person's wishes for distributing their assets and can provide evidence of sound mind and intent in estate planning.

  2. Video wills should only be used as a supplement to a formal, legally binding paper will, as state laws and guidelines must still be followed.

  3. A living trust only covers property transferred in writing and cannot handle certain tasks such as naming a guardian or forgiving debts, whereas a will can.

What Exactly Are Video Wills?

Video wills are exactly what the name implies: filmed declarations of the testator stating their wishes for allocating their estate's assets

These intentions often contain a description of assets, the beneficiaries to whom they will be distributed, and the name of an executor who will administer the estate through probate

Getting the Will-Signing Ceremony on Video

Woman signing document

Videotaping the will-signing ceremony or reading the will out loud on video might be beneficial for several reasons.

A video will may prevent allegations that you were under the influence of alcohol or drugs when you signed your will. 

If you believe the provisions of your will could anger a close family member to the point that they may hire an attorney and fight your will in probate court, you need to take measures to prevent that unpleasant scenario. 

Making a video of you and your witnesses signing your will is a handy strategy in these situations.

If the video shows that you are reasonable, understand the terms of your will, and are using the will to communicate your own intentions (rather than someone else's), it will go a long way toward preventing someone from suing later—or beating a claim if someone does challenge your will.

Someone attempting to contest a will must provide convincing proof that you were unaware of who your nearest family members were, were unaware of what you possessed, or were improperly influenced by someone seeking to benefit. 

A video of you explaining your actions or behaving freely and autonomously might assist in disproving such allegations.

A video of the will signing ceremony may demonstrate that you carried out the will appropriately. 

Your will is only legal if you sign it per the formalities established by your state's law. 

In some states, there must be two (or more) adult witnesses present, you must inform them that the paper is your last will and testament, and they must sign it. 

Many states need you and the witnesses to sign the paperwork in the same room. 

A video of the witnesses watching you sign and subsequently signing the will for themselves is good evidence to have in the event of a dispute.

Explaining or Adding to Your Estate Plan

Damaged feelings and disagreements are sometimes the outcomes of a surprise in a will or trust. 

For instance, if children anticipate getting equal parts of their parents' inheritance but do not, or if a more distant family member receives a greater share at the cost of a child, there may be conflict.

You do not have to explain your decisions—your belongings are yours to do with as you wish—but a recording can be a simple and effective way to do so. 

For instance, if you wish to leave a larger portion of your assets to one of your kids because you've already given the others cash to help them purchase homes, or if you want one kid to act as executor, you should specify this. 

With a video will, your children will not be kept in the dark about your behavior, which may avoid some arguing.

The Benefits and Drawbacks of a Video Will


Let's look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of a video will.

Benefits:

A video will might help you avoid accusations that you were not of sound mind or were unfairly influenced when you signed your will. 

A video will be useful if someone is dissatisfied with your will and chooses to employ a lawyer to fight it. 

The film may also include footage of you and your witnesses signing your will. In such an instance, it proves that you were rational, aware of the contents of your will, and expressed your intentions.

A video may be used to enhance your formal estate plan. A video will, for example, allow you to name one of your children as executor. 

If you wish to go into further detail, a video might convey how you want your family to divide up precious goods.

Drawbacks: 

Although you may use your video will to specify how your family should disperse treasured belongings, your desires are not legally binding. 

That is, your video will not be accepted by a probate court, a bank, or any other organization with assets under your name. 

Only a formal paper will is legally binding.

Videos do not stick around forever and are, therefore, susceptible to damage or deletion.

If you choose a video will, think of it as an addition to a formal, legal paper will prepared by an estate planning attorney, and keep the following guidelines in mind:

  1. Make use of a high-quality camera that can clearly identify your face.

  2. Speak clearly and loudly, with as little background noise as possible.

  3. Maintain a medium close-up on the video-captured region.

  4. The video cannot be modified and must include any technical data required to play it again.

  5. Some states require you to be sworn in by someone legally authorized to administer oaths.

  6. Any court officials must identify themselves on camera before delivering the oath.

  7. Before relaying your final desires and the recorded names of your beneficiaries, mention the recording's date, time, and location, as well as the names and addresses of the will's witnesses if they are not present at the taping.

  8. The video should continue uninterrupted.

Finally, remember that a will, whether written or recorded, is not your sole estate planning option. Various trusts may also assist in ensuring that your fortune is distributed following your preferences.

A living trust is a legal document in which you leave your property to whomever you choose. 

The benefit of a living trust is that property assigned through a trust doesn't have to go through probate after you die, saving your family lots of money and time.

But even if you create a living trust, you should still have a will. 

A Living Trust Will Never Include Everything You Own

One important reason to prepare a will is that a living trust only protects property you have transferred to the trust in writing. 

Very few people give their whole estate to a trust. 

Even if you meticulously transfer everything, there's always the possibility that you'll acquire property just before you die. It will only pass under the trust's provisions if you think to (or are unable to) transfer ownership to your living trust.

A Will Can Do Things That A Trust Cannot

A will can do several vital tasks that a living trust cannot. 

For example, in many jurisdictions, naming a guardian for young children—someone to raise them if you and the other parent die before they reach adulthood—requires the use of a will. You are unable to utilize your living trust. 

A will may also be used to forgive (cancel) debts due to you, something a trust agreement cannot accomplish.

What are Nuncupative Wills?

Portrait of elderly man

It is worth mentioning that only a few states permit oral wills (also known as nuncupative wills).

Nuncupative wills are sometimes known as deathbed wills. This refers to circumstances in which the testator communicates their bequests and intentions to witnesses, generally because they do not have the chance to prepare a written will. 

A video will might be acceptable in places that recognize nuncupative wills if it fits all of the other conditions of the state legislation.

These conditions, however, are often quite restricted and detailed and normally demand that the testator dies within a certain amount of time after drafting their spoken will. While it is feasible, meeting all regulatory criteria, including the time limits, would be tough. 

The video will is more likely to be used as a backup or complement to a written will, proving that the testator was rational and free of influence.

Suggestions

Consult an attorney if you are contemplating a video will since state rules might change to reflect trends. 

A video should only support your written will, which should always qualify as legal. 

An attorney can update you on any changes in state law and ensure that your will is drafted correctly. 

How Can Trustworthy Help?

Trustworthy can help you keep your will and living trust documents safe. 

When you sign up for Trustworthy, you get access to a secure server where you can upload and share your important estate planning documents. Your family and friends will never have to worry about the location of your paper documents when they can easily access them online.

Save your family time and money in the event of your passing by registering for a free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Estate Planning

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2022

Hiring an attorney to write a will might seem like a lot of effort and money. 

Isn't it easier to plop down, put on the camera, and film yourself stating your preferences for who should inherit your belongings or act as guardians for your kids?

It may be simpler, but it might not result in a legitimate will. 

In most cases, a will must be written and signed to be legitimate. Most states require a will to be dated and witnessed by two people who saw you sign it and may subsequently testify that you looked to be of sound mind and acted of your own free will.

Unless your video will is written down, signed, and witnessed, it probably won’t be legally binding. 

However, even if it isn't a legally valid will by itself, a video recording may be a handy tool when creating a will, particularly if you're worried about someone challenging your will after you die. 

It may also comfort your loved ones, for instance, if you wished to explain why you decided to leave your possessions in the manner you did.

In this article, you will learn more about the legitimacy of a video will and creating a valid will.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Video wills are recorded declarations of a person's wishes for distributing their assets and can provide evidence of sound mind and intent in estate planning.

  2. Video wills should only be used as a supplement to a formal, legally binding paper will, as state laws and guidelines must still be followed.

  3. A living trust only covers property transferred in writing and cannot handle certain tasks such as naming a guardian or forgiving debts, whereas a will can.

What Exactly Are Video Wills?

Video wills are exactly what the name implies: filmed declarations of the testator stating their wishes for allocating their estate's assets

These intentions often contain a description of assets, the beneficiaries to whom they will be distributed, and the name of an executor who will administer the estate through probate

Getting the Will-Signing Ceremony on Video

Woman signing document

Videotaping the will-signing ceremony or reading the will out loud on video might be beneficial for several reasons.

A video will may prevent allegations that you were under the influence of alcohol or drugs when you signed your will. 

If you believe the provisions of your will could anger a close family member to the point that they may hire an attorney and fight your will in probate court, you need to take measures to prevent that unpleasant scenario. 

Making a video of you and your witnesses signing your will is a handy strategy in these situations.

If the video shows that you are reasonable, understand the terms of your will, and are using the will to communicate your own intentions (rather than someone else's), it will go a long way toward preventing someone from suing later—or beating a claim if someone does challenge your will.

Someone attempting to contest a will must provide convincing proof that you were unaware of who your nearest family members were, were unaware of what you possessed, or were improperly influenced by someone seeking to benefit. 

A video of you explaining your actions or behaving freely and autonomously might assist in disproving such allegations.

A video of the will signing ceremony may demonstrate that you carried out the will appropriately. 

Your will is only legal if you sign it per the formalities established by your state's law. 

In some states, there must be two (or more) adult witnesses present, you must inform them that the paper is your last will and testament, and they must sign it. 

Many states need you and the witnesses to sign the paperwork in the same room. 

A video of the witnesses watching you sign and subsequently signing the will for themselves is good evidence to have in the event of a dispute.

Explaining or Adding to Your Estate Plan

Damaged feelings and disagreements are sometimes the outcomes of a surprise in a will or trust. 

For instance, if children anticipate getting equal parts of their parents' inheritance but do not, or if a more distant family member receives a greater share at the cost of a child, there may be conflict.

You do not have to explain your decisions—your belongings are yours to do with as you wish—but a recording can be a simple and effective way to do so. 

For instance, if you wish to leave a larger portion of your assets to one of your kids because you've already given the others cash to help them purchase homes, or if you want one kid to act as executor, you should specify this. 

With a video will, your children will not be kept in the dark about your behavior, which may avoid some arguing.

The Benefits and Drawbacks of a Video Will


Let's look at some of the advantages and disadvantages of a video will.

Benefits:

A video will might help you avoid accusations that you were not of sound mind or were unfairly influenced when you signed your will. 

A video will be useful if someone is dissatisfied with your will and chooses to employ a lawyer to fight it. 

The film may also include footage of you and your witnesses signing your will. In such an instance, it proves that you were rational, aware of the contents of your will, and expressed your intentions.

A video may be used to enhance your formal estate plan. A video will, for example, allow you to name one of your children as executor. 

If you wish to go into further detail, a video might convey how you want your family to divide up precious goods.

Drawbacks: 

Although you may use your video will to specify how your family should disperse treasured belongings, your desires are not legally binding. 

That is, your video will not be accepted by a probate court, a bank, or any other organization with assets under your name. 

Only a formal paper will is legally binding.

Videos do not stick around forever and are, therefore, susceptible to damage or deletion.

If you choose a video will, think of it as an addition to a formal, legal paper will prepared by an estate planning attorney, and keep the following guidelines in mind:

  1. Make use of a high-quality camera that can clearly identify your face.

  2. Speak clearly and loudly, with as little background noise as possible.

  3. Maintain a medium close-up on the video-captured region.

  4. The video cannot be modified and must include any technical data required to play it again.

  5. Some states require you to be sworn in by someone legally authorized to administer oaths.

  6. Any court officials must identify themselves on camera before delivering the oath.

  7. Before relaying your final desires and the recorded names of your beneficiaries, mention the recording's date, time, and location, as well as the names and addresses of the will's witnesses if they are not present at the taping.

  8. The video should continue uninterrupted.

Finally, remember that a will, whether written or recorded, is not your sole estate planning option. Various trusts may also assist in ensuring that your fortune is distributed following your preferences.

A living trust is a legal document in which you leave your property to whomever you choose. 

The benefit of a living trust is that property assigned through a trust doesn't have to go through probate after you die, saving your family lots of money and time.

But even if you create a living trust, you should still have a will. 

A Living Trust Will Never Include Everything You Own

One important reason to prepare a will is that a living trust only protects property you have transferred to the trust in writing. 

Very few people give their whole estate to a trust. 

Even if you meticulously transfer everything, there's always the possibility that you'll acquire property just before you die. It will only pass under the trust's provisions if you think to (or are unable to) transfer ownership to your living trust.

A Will Can Do Things That A Trust Cannot

A will can do several vital tasks that a living trust cannot. 

For example, in many jurisdictions, naming a guardian for young children—someone to raise them if you and the other parent die before they reach adulthood—requires the use of a will. You are unable to utilize your living trust. 

A will may also be used to forgive (cancel) debts due to you, something a trust agreement cannot accomplish.

What are Nuncupative Wills?

Portrait of elderly man

It is worth mentioning that only a few states permit oral wills (also known as nuncupative wills).

Nuncupative wills are sometimes known as deathbed wills. This refers to circumstances in which the testator communicates their bequests and intentions to witnesses, generally because they do not have the chance to prepare a written will. 

A video will might be acceptable in places that recognize nuncupative wills if it fits all of the other conditions of the state legislation.

These conditions, however, are often quite restricted and detailed and normally demand that the testator dies within a certain amount of time after drafting their spoken will. While it is feasible, meeting all regulatory criteria, including the time limits, would be tough. 

The video will is more likely to be used as a backup or complement to a written will, proving that the testator was rational and free of influence.

Suggestions

Consult an attorney if you are contemplating a video will since state rules might change to reflect trends. 

A video should only support your written will, which should always qualify as legal. 

An attorney can update you on any changes in state law and ensure that your will is drafted correctly. 

How Can Trustworthy Help?

Trustworthy can help you keep your will and living trust documents safe. 

When you sign up for Trustworthy, you get access to a secure server where you can upload and share your important estate planning documents. Your family and friends will never have to worry about the location of your paper documents when they can easily access them online.

Save your family time and money in the event of your passing by registering for a free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

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steps for writing a eulogy for mom

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steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad

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who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies

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how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost

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reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary

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6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

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where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary

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obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

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buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

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trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

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401k and minors
401k and minors

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grandparents
grandparents

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Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

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are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

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Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

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Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

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Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

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Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

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Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

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A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

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Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

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Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

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Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

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Person signing a document
Person signing a document

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Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

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Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

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A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

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Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

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Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

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Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

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Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

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Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

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Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

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Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

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Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

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How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

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How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

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I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

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I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

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White house
White house

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Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
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Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

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What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

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A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them

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What To Bring To Estate Planning Meeting (Checklist)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional

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When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

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Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

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Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

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Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

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Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

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Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

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Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

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Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand

Apr 15, 2023

Can The Executor Of A Will Access Bank Accounts? (Yes, Here's How)

Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

Complete List of Things To Do For Elderly Parents (Checklist)

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Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For A Deceased Person?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Help Elderly Parents From A Distance? 7 Tips

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Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents

Apr 15, 2023

Legal Documents For Elderly Parents: Checklist

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House
House

Apr 15, 2023

Selling Elderly Parents Home: How To Do It + Mistakes To Avoid

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Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache

Apr 15, 2023

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork

Apr 6, 2023

Can An Out of State Attorney Write My Will? (A Lawyer Answers)

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People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills

Mar 15, 2023

Settling an Estate: A Step-by-Step Guide

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Check on the table
Check on the table

Feb 10, 2023

My Deceased Husband Received A Check In The Mail (4 Steps To Take)

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The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

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The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

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How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Feb 6, 2023

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

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Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Collect Your Parents' Social Security When They Die?

Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book

Feb 1, 2023

How Do I Stop VA Benefits When Someone Dies (Simple Guide)

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Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Pay Money Into A Deceased Person's Bank Account?

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Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Feb 1, 2023

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.

Feb 1, 2023

Does The DMV Know When Someone Dies?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Feb 1, 2023

How To Find A Deceased Person's Lawyer (5 Ways)

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Feb 1, 2023

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form

Feb 1, 2023

How to Stop Social Security Direct Deposit After Death

Firearm
Firearm
Firearm

Feb 1, 2023

How To Transfer Firearms From A Deceased Person (3 Steps)

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Feb 1, 2023

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

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Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road

Feb 1, 2023

What Happens To A Leased Vehicle When Someone Dies?

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Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

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Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

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Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop

Jan 31, 2023

How To Get Into a Deceased Person's Computer (Microsoft & Apple)

Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation

Jan 31, 2023

Why Do Funeral Homes Take Fingerprints of the Deceased?

Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home

Jan 31, 2023

What To Do If Your Deceased Parents' Home Is In Foreclosure

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Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Jan 31, 2023

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

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Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer

Jan 31, 2023

What Happens If a Deceased Individual Owes Taxes?

Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional

Jan 31, 2023

Components of Estate Planning: 6 Things To Consider

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What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Jan 22, 2023

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives

Jan 8, 2023

What Does a Typical Estate Plan Include?

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Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Apr 15, 2022

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2022

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom

Mar 2, 2022

What Does Your “Property” Mean?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is the Uniform Trust Code? What is the Uniform Probate Code?

Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales

Mar 2, 2022

Do You Need to Avoid Probate?

Person signing document
Person signing document
Person signing document

Mar 2, 2022

How is a Trust Created?

stethoscope
stethoscope
stethoscope

Mar 2, 2022

What Are Advance Directives?

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Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach

Mar 2, 2022

What does a Trustee Do?

Large house exterior
Large house exterior
Large house exterior

Mar 2, 2022

What is an Estate Plan? (And why you need one)

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is Probate?

United States Map
United States Map
United States Map

Mar 2, 2022

What Is Your Domicile & Why It Matters

Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork

Mar 2, 2022

What Is a Power of Attorney for Finances?

A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed

Mar 1, 2022

Should your family consider an umbrella insurance policy?

Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks

Mar 1, 2022

Do I need a digital power of attorney?

Person signing documents
Person signing documents
Person signing documents

Apr 6, 2020

What Exactly is a Trust?