Estate Planning

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Larry Li

Feb 1, 2023

There’s nothing more difficult than dealing with the loss of somebody you cherish. Whether it’s a spouse, friend, or family member, you need time to grieve and honor the life of your loved one.

But how do you stop the mail of a deceased person?

The executor of the deceased person’s estate must notify the post office of the death. After the executor completes the probate process, they can hand-deliver or mail a copy of the probate order to your loved one’s local post office. Then, the executor should register the loved one on the Deceased Do Not Contact List. 

The United States Postal Service (USPS) runs an efficient system where nearly nothing stops them from delivering mail, even the deaths of the recipients. Therefore, the deceased person’s loved ones are responsible for stopping the mail or forwarding it to another address.

In today’s in-depth guide, you’ll learn:

  • What happens to mail when a person dies

  • How to stop mail for a deceased person

  • If you can stop all mail to the deceased

  • How to plan ahead with Trustworthy

What Happens to Mail When a Person Dies?

When someone passes away, mail continues to be delivered to the last address on record until someone notifies the post office. Therefore, it’s the responsibility of the survivors or executors to handle these notifications. 

While the Social Security Administration takes care of some notifications, such as pensions, mail for things like subscriptions, credit cards, and utilities must be handled by the executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Although there are no laws or estate planning rules that require you to stop the mail for a deceased person, the letters can be a consistent painful reminder of your loss. Furthermore, if the mail falls into the hands of the wrong person, they can use the information to impersonate the deceased with malicious intent.

However, receiving mail for a deceased loved one may be important for a temporary period of time as you pay off bills and close certain accounts. Once you settle all outstanding matters, it’s in your best interests to stop all delivery of mail for the deceased. 

How to Stop Mail For a Deceased Person

Infographic: 5 steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person

Let’s dive into how to stop mail for a loved one who passed away. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as calling your local post office to tell them about the death. However, the process of stopping mail delivery for a deceased person is relatively straightforward if you know what to do and which steps to follow.

Before we start, you must know that only the executor of the deceased one’s estate has the authority to stop the mail. The executor is the individual who was appointed by the probate court to handle the closing of the deceased person’s estate. 

This includes closing all of their personal affairs and notifying the United States Postal Service, Social Security Administration, and credit bureaus. 

If you currently receive your loved one’s mail but are not the executor of their estate, you should forward the mail to the executor’s address. The executor is the only person who’s legally authorized to open, manage, and stop mail on behalf of the deceased loved one. 

Here are the five steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person:

Step 1: Notify Post Office

Your first task is to notify the post office of your loved one’s death. Then, once the estate has handled and closed the probate process, you can mail or hand-deliver a copy of the probate order to the local post office.

The court order should state that the estate is closed and clears you from executor tasks. For this reason, you don’t need to open and read the deceased person’s mail. 

You must also include a letter requesting that all mail services be stopped immediately. However, it’s important to remember there are no exceptions for certain types of mail, so you must wait until the probate process is complete to cancel mail delivery entirely. 

The process of mail cancellation also varies from post office to post office. Some post offices have an online form you can fill out to notify them of the death. Furthermore, you may need to visit the post office physically to fill out a form.

Our best recommendation is to call the post office for exact instructions for your specific case. This way, you’ll know with certainty what steps you must take in order to stop mail for your deceased loved one.

Step 2: Register on the Deceased Do Not Contact (DDNC) List

After requesting to stop mail delivery with the post office, your second task is to submit a request to stop all mail, phone calls, and emails from marketing agencies.

You can do so by contacting the DMA Choice, which is a non-profit organization that runs the Deceased Do Not Contact list. As a member of the Association of National Advertisers, the DMA manages a list of direct marketing agencies.

Once you register through the DMA’s DDNC list, you can reduce unnecessary messages from most advertisers. You can enroll in the DDNC by visiting the DMA Choice website and filling out the form. Members inside the DNCC are removed from the DMA Choice’s direct marketing lists.

However, you must understand that there are marketers that don’t belong to the DMA Choice. Therefore, this step doesn’t eliminate all marketing efforts but reduces them significantly. 

Step 3: Forward Mail to a New Address

Instead of stopping mail immediately, you can forward all of your loved one’s mail to a different address. For example, if you are the deceased person’s relative and estate executor, you can forward all the mail to the surviving spouse.

This way, your loved one’s spouse can receive essential information such as bills and certain notifications. However, you must obtain permission from the other individual before forwarding the deceased’s mail to the new address.

You can forward mail to a new address by filing a request with the local USPS office. The USPS will request you to fill out a forwarding change of address order. Once you’re ready for this step, be prepared to show proof that you are authorized to manage your deceased loved one’s mail.

This proof is usually in the form of a court order stating you are the appointed administrator or executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Step 4: Cancel Subscriptions

The fourth step is to cancel subscriptions and all recurring mail delivered to your loved one’s mailbox. These include subscriptions for services such as magazines, newsletters, or newspapers.

You can cancel these subscriptions by contacting the subscription company directly. It’s important to cancel the subscriptions as soon as possible so they don’t continue to charge your deceased loved one’s bank account.

It’s also important to cancel non-physical subscriptions, such as streaming services (Netflix, Spotify) and online media catalogs (Wall Street Journal). 

Step 5: Utilize Return to Sender

The last step you can take is to use the “Return to Sender” function of the post office. You can utilize this function by writing “Deceased, Return to Sender” on all the mail addressed to the deceased person.

Simply put the letter back in the mailbox or other outbound box, and the mail carrier will collect and forward it the following business day. 

However, you should understand that the systems for stopping a deceased person's mail aren’t perfect. It may take some time for your requests to be fulfilled. Therefore, expect to continue receiving mail for a reasonable timespan. 

Can I Stop All Mail to the Deceased?

Sadly, it’s difficult to stop all mail to the deceased. This is because junk mail is nearly impossible to stop. However, you can stop the majority of junk mail by registering with DMA Choice by following the steps above.

If you continue to receive mail from junk mailers, you should contact the sender and explain how the person has passed away, and they must stop sending mail to the deceased person. You should also follow step five and write “Deceased, Return to Sender” on the original envelope and drop it in an outbox.

However, you can only utilize step five for first class mail. There are two types of USPS mail: first class and non-first class. First class mail is first class stamped, metered, priority, and special endorsed. Non-first class mail usually contains marketing letters and junk mail.

Unlike first class mail, non-first class mail does not provide free automatic returns and mail forwarding. Therefore, your best plan of action is to contact junk mailers directly to stop all mail to the deceased.

Planning Ahead With Trustworthy

At Trustworthy, we understand how difficult it is to deal with losing someone you love. We also know that having to handle all aspects of your loved one’s estate in the midst of your grieving and remembrance makes everything more difficult. Trustworthy simplifies this process so you have space to grieve and heal. 

Trustworthy is an innovative digital storage and collaboration platform dedicated to storing and securing sensitive information. You can manage estate details and collaborate with estate planning attorneys, executors, and other professionals through Trustworthy.

Trustworthy can also help you manage your own estate. With the Estate Planning tab, you can secure all your estate planning documents like power of attorney and last will and testament in one secured location. This allows you to review and edit your estate documents regularly while keeping your estate attorney and executor updated with the latest changes. 

Have more questions about estate planning? Our estate planning guide can help.

Our Experts can help you gather the necessary documents to start drafting your estate plan. Start your 14 day free trial today.

Related Articles

Estate Planning

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Larry Li

Feb 1, 2023

There’s nothing more difficult than dealing with the loss of somebody you cherish. Whether it’s a spouse, friend, or family member, you need time to grieve and honor the life of your loved one.

But how do you stop the mail of a deceased person?

The executor of the deceased person’s estate must notify the post office of the death. After the executor completes the probate process, they can hand-deliver or mail a copy of the probate order to your loved one’s local post office. Then, the executor should register the loved one on the Deceased Do Not Contact List. 

The United States Postal Service (USPS) runs an efficient system where nearly nothing stops them from delivering mail, even the deaths of the recipients. Therefore, the deceased person’s loved ones are responsible for stopping the mail or forwarding it to another address.

In today’s in-depth guide, you’ll learn:

  • What happens to mail when a person dies

  • How to stop mail for a deceased person

  • If you can stop all mail to the deceased

  • How to plan ahead with Trustworthy

What Happens to Mail When a Person Dies?

When someone passes away, mail continues to be delivered to the last address on record until someone notifies the post office. Therefore, it’s the responsibility of the survivors or executors to handle these notifications. 

While the Social Security Administration takes care of some notifications, such as pensions, mail for things like subscriptions, credit cards, and utilities must be handled by the executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Although there are no laws or estate planning rules that require you to stop the mail for a deceased person, the letters can be a consistent painful reminder of your loss. Furthermore, if the mail falls into the hands of the wrong person, they can use the information to impersonate the deceased with malicious intent.

However, receiving mail for a deceased loved one may be important for a temporary period of time as you pay off bills and close certain accounts. Once you settle all outstanding matters, it’s in your best interests to stop all delivery of mail for the deceased. 

How to Stop Mail For a Deceased Person

Infographic: 5 steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person

Let’s dive into how to stop mail for a loved one who passed away. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as calling your local post office to tell them about the death. However, the process of stopping mail delivery for a deceased person is relatively straightforward if you know what to do and which steps to follow.

Before we start, you must know that only the executor of the deceased one’s estate has the authority to stop the mail. The executor is the individual who was appointed by the probate court to handle the closing of the deceased person’s estate. 

This includes closing all of their personal affairs and notifying the United States Postal Service, Social Security Administration, and credit bureaus. 

If you currently receive your loved one’s mail but are not the executor of their estate, you should forward the mail to the executor’s address. The executor is the only person who’s legally authorized to open, manage, and stop mail on behalf of the deceased loved one. 

Here are the five steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person:

Step 1: Notify Post Office

Your first task is to notify the post office of your loved one’s death. Then, once the estate has handled and closed the probate process, you can mail or hand-deliver a copy of the probate order to the local post office.

The court order should state that the estate is closed and clears you from executor tasks. For this reason, you don’t need to open and read the deceased person’s mail. 

You must also include a letter requesting that all mail services be stopped immediately. However, it’s important to remember there are no exceptions for certain types of mail, so you must wait until the probate process is complete to cancel mail delivery entirely. 

The process of mail cancellation also varies from post office to post office. Some post offices have an online form you can fill out to notify them of the death. Furthermore, you may need to visit the post office physically to fill out a form.

Our best recommendation is to call the post office for exact instructions for your specific case. This way, you’ll know with certainty what steps you must take in order to stop mail for your deceased loved one.

Step 2: Register on the Deceased Do Not Contact (DDNC) List

After requesting to stop mail delivery with the post office, your second task is to submit a request to stop all mail, phone calls, and emails from marketing agencies.

You can do so by contacting the DMA Choice, which is a non-profit organization that runs the Deceased Do Not Contact list. As a member of the Association of National Advertisers, the DMA manages a list of direct marketing agencies.

Once you register through the DMA’s DDNC list, you can reduce unnecessary messages from most advertisers. You can enroll in the DDNC by visiting the DMA Choice website and filling out the form. Members inside the DNCC are removed from the DMA Choice’s direct marketing lists.

However, you must understand that there are marketers that don’t belong to the DMA Choice. Therefore, this step doesn’t eliminate all marketing efforts but reduces them significantly. 

Step 3: Forward Mail to a New Address

Instead of stopping mail immediately, you can forward all of your loved one’s mail to a different address. For example, if you are the deceased person’s relative and estate executor, you can forward all the mail to the surviving spouse.

This way, your loved one’s spouse can receive essential information such as bills and certain notifications. However, you must obtain permission from the other individual before forwarding the deceased’s mail to the new address.

You can forward mail to a new address by filing a request with the local USPS office. The USPS will request you to fill out a forwarding change of address order. Once you’re ready for this step, be prepared to show proof that you are authorized to manage your deceased loved one’s mail.

This proof is usually in the form of a court order stating you are the appointed administrator or executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Step 4: Cancel Subscriptions

The fourth step is to cancel subscriptions and all recurring mail delivered to your loved one’s mailbox. These include subscriptions for services such as magazines, newsletters, or newspapers.

You can cancel these subscriptions by contacting the subscription company directly. It’s important to cancel the subscriptions as soon as possible so they don’t continue to charge your deceased loved one’s bank account.

It’s also important to cancel non-physical subscriptions, such as streaming services (Netflix, Spotify) and online media catalogs (Wall Street Journal). 

Step 5: Utilize Return to Sender

The last step you can take is to use the “Return to Sender” function of the post office. You can utilize this function by writing “Deceased, Return to Sender” on all the mail addressed to the deceased person.

Simply put the letter back in the mailbox or other outbound box, and the mail carrier will collect and forward it the following business day. 

However, you should understand that the systems for stopping a deceased person's mail aren’t perfect. It may take some time for your requests to be fulfilled. Therefore, expect to continue receiving mail for a reasonable timespan. 

Can I Stop All Mail to the Deceased?

Sadly, it’s difficult to stop all mail to the deceased. This is because junk mail is nearly impossible to stop. However, you can stop the majority of junk mail by registering with DMA Choice by following the steps above.

If you continue to receive mail from junk mailers, you should contact the sender and explain how the person has passed away, and they must stop sending mail to the deceased person. You should also follow step five and write “Deceased, Return to Sender” on the original envelope and drop it in an outbox.

However, you can only utilize step five for first class mail. There are two types of USPS mail: first class and non-first class. First class mail is first class stamped, metered, priority, and special endorsed. Non-first class mail usually contains marketing letters and junk mail.

Unlike first class mail, non-first class mail does not provide free automatic returns and mail forwarding. Therefore, your best plan of action is to contact junk mailers directly to stop all mail to the deceased.

Planning Ahead With Trustworthy

At Trustworthy, we understand how difficult it is to deal with losing someone you love. We also know that having to handle all aspects of your loved one’s estate in the midst of your grieving and remembrance makes everything more difficult. Trustworthy simplifies this process so you have space to grieve and heal. 

Trustworthy is an innovative digital storage and collaboration platform dedicated to storing and securing sensitive information. You can manage estate details and collaborate with estate planning attorneys, executors, and other professionals through Trustworthy.

Trustworthy can also help you manage your own estate. With the Estate Planning tab, you can secure all your estate planning documents like power of attorney and last will and testament in one secured location. This allows you to review and edit your estate documents regularly while keeping your estate attorney and executor updated with the latest changes. 

Have more questions about estate planning? Our estate planning guide can help.

Our Experts can help you gather the necessary documents to start drafting your estate plan. Start your 14 day free trial today.

Related Articles

Estate Planning

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Larry Li

Feb 1, 2023

There’s nothing more difficult than dealing with the loss of somebody you cherish. Whether it’s a spouse, friend, or family member, you need time to grieve and honor the life of your loved one.

But how do you stop the mail of a deceased person?

The executor of the deceased person’s estate must notify the post office of the death. After the executor completes the probate process, they can hand-deliver or mail a copy of the probate order to your loved one’s local post office. Then, the executor should register the loved one on the Deceased Do Not Contact List. 

The United States Postal Service (USPS) runs an efficient system where nearly nothing stops them from delivering mail, even the deaths of the recipients. Therefore, the deceased person’s loved ones are responsible for stopping the mail or forwarding it to another address.

In today’s in-depth guide, you’ll learn:

  • What happens to mail when a person dies

  • How to stop mail for a deceased person

  • If you can stop all mail to the deceased

  • How to plan ahead with Trustworthy

What Happens to Mail When a Person Dies?

When someone passes away, mail continues to be delivered to the last address on record until someone notifies the post office. Therefore, it’s the responsibility of the survivors or executors to handle these notifications. 

While the Social Security Administration takes care of some notifications, such as pensions, mail for things like subscriptions, credit cards, and utilities must be handled by the executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Although there are no laws or estate planning rules that require you to stop the mail for a deceased person, the letters can be a consistent painful reminder of your loss. Furthermore, if the mail falls into the hands of the wrong person, they can use the information to impersonate the deceased with malicious intent.

However, receiving mail for a deceased loved one may be important for a temporary period of time as you pay off bills and close certain accounts. Once you settle all outstanding matters, it’s in your best interests to stop all delivery of mail for the deceased. 

How to Stop Mail For a Deceased Person

Infographic: 5 steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person

Let’s dive into how to stop mail for a loved one who passed away. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as calling your local post office to tell them about the death. However, the process of stopping mail delivery for a deceased person is relatively straightforward if you know what to do and which steps to follow.

Before we start, you must know that only the executor of the deceased one’s estate has the authority to stop the mail. The executor is the individual who was appointed by the probate court to handle the closing of the deceased person’s estate. 

This includes closing all of their personal affairs and notifying the United States Postal Service, Social Security Administration, and credit bureaus. 

If you currently receive your loved one’s mail but are not the executor of their estate, you should forward the mail to the executor’s address. The executor is the only person who’s legally authorized to open, manage, and stop mail on behalf of the deceased loved one. 

Here are the five steps you must take to stop mail for a deceased person:

Step 1: Notify Post Office

Your first task is to notify the post office of your loved one’s death. Then, once the estate has handled and closed the probate process, you can mail or hand-deliver a copy of the probate order to the local post office.

The court order should state that the estate is closed and clears you from executor tasks. For this reason, you don’t need to open and read the deceased person’s mail. 

You must also include a letter requesting that all mail services be stopped immediately. However, it’s important to remember there are no exceptions for certain types of mail, so you must wait until the probate process is complete to cancel mail delivery entirely. 

The process of mail cancellation also varies from post office to post office. Some post offices have an online form you can fill out to notify them of the death. Furthermore, you may need to visit the post office physically to fill out a form.

Our best recommendation is to call the post office for exact instructions for your specific case. This way, you’ll know with certainty what steps you must take in order to stop mail for your deceased loved one.

Step 2: Register on the Deceased Do Not Contact (DDNC) List

After requesting to stop mail delivery with the post office, your second task is to submit a request to stop all mail, phone calls, and emails from marketing agencies.

You can do so by contacting the DMA Choice, which is a non-profit organization that runs the Deceased Do Not Contact list. As a member of the Association of National Advertisers, the DMA manages a list of direct marketing agencies.

Once you register through the DMA’s DDNC list, you can reduce unnecessary messages from most advertisers. You can enroll in the DDNC by visiting the DMA Choice website and filling out the form. Members inside the DNCC are removed from the DMA Choice’s direct marketing lists.

However, you must understand that there are marketers that don’t belong to the DMA Choice. Therefore, this step doesn’t eliminate all marketing efforts but reduces them significantly. 

Step 3: Forward Mail to a New Address

Instead of stopping mail immediately, you can forward all of your loved one’s mail to a different address. For example, if you are the deceased person’s relative and estate executor, you can forward all the mail to the surviving spouse.

This way, your loved one’s spouse can receive essential information such as bills and certain notifications. However, you must obtain permission from the other individual before forwarding the deceased’s mail to the new address.

You can forward mail to a new address by filing a request with the local USPS office. The USPS will request you to fill out a forwarding change of address order. Once you’re ready for this step, be prepared to show proof that you are authorized to manage your deceased loved one’s mail.

This proof is usually in the form of a court order stating you are the appointed administrator or executor of the deceased one’s estate. 

Step 4: Cancel Subscriptions

The fourth step is to cancel subscriptions and all recurring mail delivered to your loved one’s mailbox. These include subscriptions for services such as magazines, newsletters, or newspapers.

You can cancel these subscriptions by contacting the subscription company directly. It’s important to cancel the subscriptions as soon as possible so they don’t continue to charge your deceased loved one’s bank account.

It’s also important to cancel non-physical subscriptions, such as streaming services (Netflix, Spotify) and online media catalogs (Wall Street Journal). 

Step 5: Utilize Return to Sender

The last step you can take is to use the “Return to Sender” function of the post office. You can utilize this function by writing “Deceased, Return to Sender” on all the mail addressed to the deceased person.

Simply put the letter back in the mailbox or other outbound box, and the mail carrier will collect and forward it the following business day. 

However, you should understand that the systems for stopping a deceased person's mail aren’t perfect. It may take some time for your requests to be fulfilled. Therefore, expect to continue receiving mail for a reasonable timespan. 

Can I Stop All Mail to the Deceased?

Sadly, it’s difficult to stop all mail to the deceased. This is because junk mail is nearly impossible to stop. However, you can stop the majority of junk mail by registering with DMA Choice by following the steps above.

If you continue to receive mail from junk mailers, you should contact the sender and explain how the person has passed away, and they must stop sending mail to the deceased person. You should also follow step five and write “Deceased, Return to Sender” on the original envelope and drop it in an outbox.

However, you can only utilize step five for first class mail. There are two types of USPS mail: first class and non-first class. First class mail is first class stamped, metered, priority, and special endorsed. Non-first class mail usually contains marketing letters and junk mail.

Unlike first class mail, non-first class mail does not provide free automatic returns and mail forwarding. Therefore, your best plan of action is to contact junk mailers directly to stop all mail to the deceased.

Planning Ahead With Trustworthy

At Trustworthy, we understand how difficult it is to deal with losing someone you love. We also know that having to handle all aspects of your loved one’s estate in the midst of your grieving and remembrance makes everything more difficult. Trustworthy simplifies this process so you have space to grieve and heal. 

Trustworthy is an innovative digital storage and collaboration platform dedicated to storing and securing sensitive information. You can manage estate details and collaborate with estate planning attorneys, executors, and other professionals through Trustworthy.

Trustworthy can also help you manage your own estate. With the Estate Planning tab, you can secure all your estate planning documents like power of attorney and last will and testament in one secured location. This allows you to review and edit your estate documents regularly while keeping your estate attorney and executor updated with the latest changes. 

Have more questions about estate planning? Our estate planning guide can help.

Our Experts can help you gather the necessary documents to start drafting your estate plan. Start your 14 day free trial today.

Related Articles

Try Trustworthy today.

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Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

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where do you post an obituary

Oct 30, 2023

Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

Oct 30, 2023

Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

Oct 5, 2023

Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

Sep 14, 2023

I'm Trapped Caring for Elderly Parents

401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors

Oct 5, 2023

401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k

Sep 12, 2023

How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

grandparents
grandparents
grandparents

Aug 3, 2023

The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

Aug 3, 2023

The Essential Guide to Preparing for Retirement

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

Jul 14, 2023

Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

Jun 7, 2023

How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

Jun 6, 2023

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

Jun 6, 2023

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

Jun 6, 2023

How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

Jun 6, 2023

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

May 17, 2023

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

May 2, 2023

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

May 1, 2023

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document

Apr 15, 2023

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

Apr 15, 2023

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

Apr 15, 2023

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

Apr 15, 2023

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Apr 15, 2023

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Apr 15, 2023

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

Apr 15, 2023

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

White house
White house
White house

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Better To Sell or Rent An Inherited House? (Pros & Cons)

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

Apr 15, 2023

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them

Apr 15, 2023

What To Bring To Estate Planning Meeting (Checklist)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Apr 15, 2023

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Apr 15, 2023

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand

Apr 15, 2023

Can The Executor Of A Will Access Bank Accounts? (Yes, Here's How)

Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

Complete List of Things To Do For Elderly Parents (Checklist)

Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For A Deceased Person?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Help Elderly Parents From A Distance? 7 Tips

Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents

Apr 15, 2023

Legal Documents For Elderly Parents: Checklist

House
House
House

Apr 15, 2023

Selling Elderly Parents Home: How To Do It + Mistakes To Avoid

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache

Apr 15, 2023

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork

Apr 6, 2023

Can An Out of State Attorney Write My Will? (A Lawyer Answers)

People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills

Mar 15, 2023

Settling an Estate: A Step-by-Step Guide

Check on the table
Check on the table
Check on the table

Feb 10, 2023

My Deceased Husband Received A Check In The Mail (4 Steps To Take)

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

Feb 7, 2023

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Feb 6, 2023

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Collect Your Parents' Social Security When They Die?

Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book

Feb 1, 2023

How Do I Stop VA Benefits When Someone Dies (Simple Guide)

Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Pay Money Into A Deceased Person's Bank Account?

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Feb 1, 2023

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.

Feb 1, 2023

Does The DMV Know When Someone Dies?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Feb 1, 2023

How To Find A Deceased Person's Lawyer (5 Ways)

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Feb 1, 2023

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form

Feb 1, 2023

How to Stop Social Security Direct Deposit After Death

Firearm
Firearm
Firearm

Feb 1, 2023

How To Transfer Firearms From A Deceased Person (3 Steps)

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Feb 1, 2023

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road

Feb 1, 2023

What Happens To A Leased Vehicle When Someone Dies?

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Jan 31, 2023

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop

Jan 31, 2023

How To Get Into a Deceased Person's Computer (Microsoft & Apple)

Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation

Jan 31, 2023

Why Do Funeral Homes Take Fingerprints of the Deceased?

Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home

Jan 31, 2023

What To Do If Your Deceased Parents' Home Is In Foreclosure

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Jan 31, 2023

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer

Jan 31, 2023

What Happens If a Deceased Individual Owes Taxes?

Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional

Jan 31, 2023

Components of Estate Planning: 6 Things To Consider

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Jan 22, 2023

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives

Jan 8, 2023

What Does a Typical Estate Plan Include?

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Apr 15, 2022

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2022

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom

Mar 2, 2022

What Does Your “Property” Mean?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is the Uniform Trust Code? What is the Uniform Probate Code?

Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales

Mar 2, 2022

Do You Need to Avoid Probate?

Person signing document
Person signing document
Person signing document

Mar 2, 2022

How is a Trust Created?

stethoscope
stethoscope
stethoscope

Mar 2, 2022

What Are Advance Directives?

Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach

Mar 2, 2022

What does a Trustee Do?

Large house exterior
Large house exterior
Large house exterior

Mar 2, 2022

What is an Estate Plan? (And why you need one)

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is Probate?

United States Map
United States Map
United States Map

Mar 2, 2022

What Is Your Domicile & Why It Matters

Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork

Mar 2, 2022

What Is a Power of Attorney for Finances?

A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed

Mar 1, 2022

Should your family consider an umbrella insurance policy?

Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks

Mar 1, 2022

Do I need a digital power of attorney?

Person signing documents
Person signing documents
Person signing documents

Apr 6, 2020

What Exactly is a Trust?