Estate Planning

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

Nash Riggins

November 25, 2023

|

original death certificate vs. certified copy

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

There are two types of death certificates you may end up getting asked for when settling a decedent’s business: an original death certificate and a certified copy. Both document types are used in several situations, but there are a few unique differences in terms of how they’re issued and what they look like.

This guide will break down those key differences, spell out when each certificate is used, and explain what to do if you lose a copy of someone’s original death certificate.

Key Takeaways

  • An original death certificate is issued by a medical professional and filed with the Vital Records Office, while a certified copy is an official duplicate of the original.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate includes an embossed seal and rubber stamp to prove its authenticity.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate is admissible as evidence in court and can generally be used to settle someone’s estate.

What's the Difference Between an Original Death Certificate and a Certified Copy?

difference between an original death certificate and a certified copy

There are a few key differences between an original death certificate and the certified copy of a death certificate. They center mainly around how each certificate is issued.

When someone dies, a death certificate must be issued. A death certificate is an official document issued by your local government confirming someone’s death and outlining key identifiers relating to the decedent and their passing.

Although every state has the power to issue death certificates in whatever format they choose, most states use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s U.S. Standard Death Certificate. In this document, you can expect to see basic information like the person’s name and last known address, time and place of death, and cause of death (if known).

After a death has taken place, an original death certificate is prepared. A coroner, certified physician, or county medical examiner typically carries out this task. Once completed, the original death certificate is filed with the relevant branch of the U.S. Vital Records Office.

An original death certificate is always filed in the state where the death occurred. Once reviewed and cataloged by government officials, the original death certificate serves as the authoritative record of someone’s death. It won’t typically leave the Vital Records Office after being filed.

Instead, most authorities will issue a death certificate to the decedent’s next of kin. These are typically given to funeral homes and then passed on to the decedent’s family after the funeral takes place.

It’s possible to request additional death certificates from the Vital Records Office, but these additional certificates won’t be the original. Instead, you’ll be sent certified copies of the original death certificate.

Owner and attorney at Maison Law, Martin Gasparian, explains:

“A certified copy is just a copy of the original death certificate, but it has been verified by some with legal authority. The certifier must see the original document and the copy before signing it.”

Once a government registrar has viewed the original to confirm the copy is genuine, it’s given an embossed seal and stamp. This seal and stamp validate its authenticity as a certified copy of the original.

An original death certificate does not have an embossed seal and stamp. This is unique to certified copies.

When and Why Do These Differences Matter?

The difference matters as a certified copy is required for legal purposes as it includes a government seal showing that they are real and authentic,” Gasparian notes.

A certified copy is admissible as evidence in court proceedings. That means you’ll need a certified copy of a death certificate to settle any relevant probate hearings surrounding a decedent's estate.

You might also have to produce a certified copy of a death certificate to settle official government engagements or commercial transactions like closing a credit card account or bank account.

However, there are some situations where you’re required to provide an original death certificate.

Gasparian explains:

In case you are transferring the ownership of motor vehicles and real estate property, the legal paperwork requires you to produce an original death certificate rather than a certified copy. The original document also helps to prove that you are the legal beneficiary of the property.

What Should You Do If You Lose an Original Death Certificate?

what should you do if you lose an original death certificate

If you lose an original death certificate, don’t panic.

Financial Planner, Michael Ryan, advises:

If the original is lost, you can request a new certified copy from the Vital Records Office. While not ideal, the certified copy will suffice for most legal and administrative needs. The key is having an official death record validated by the government seal.”

Start by getting in touch with the Vital Records Office in the state where the death occurred. Each state has its own process in place for applying for a certified copy of the original death certificate held on file.

In most states, you’ll need to be a decedent's spouse, parent, child, sibling, or legal representative to obtain a certified copy. That being said, some states allow any member of the public to get a non-certified informational copy of a death certificate.

An informational copy has all the same information as the certified short-form copy of an original death certificate. But it doesn’t include the cause of death or important identifiers like the decedent’s Social Security Number (SSN).

Non-certified copies of a death certificate don’t hold any legal weight. They’re informational only.

To apply for a certified copy to use for legal purposes, you’ll typically have to fill out an application form that includes information about your relationship to the decedent. Additional documentation may be required, and most states charge a nominal fee to receive a new certified copy.

After receiving your certified copy, it’s critical to securely store it so it’s easy to access when called upon. If you’re collaborating with various law representatives, accountants, or business entities, it’s worth digitizing those copies so they’re easy to share.

For example, with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy, you can upload and store digital copies of all your essential family paperwork like death certificates, wills, identification documents and everything in between. Once uploaded, your family documents are protected by robust password recipes, two-factor authentication and AES 256-bit encryption.

It’s easy to grant individuals or parties access to certain documents where required. 

Suppose you’re trying to settle the estate of a loved one in probate court proceedings. In that case, you can quickly share access to digital copies of essential documents like a certified copy of a death certificate with your attorney.

Explore Trustyworthy’s range of features to learn more about how it can help you stay organized and keep tabs on important documents.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a Certified Copy of a Death Certificate as Good as the Original?

In most cases, yes: a certified copy of a death certificate holds legal weight and is admissible as evidence in court. An original may be needed to transfer assets like real estate.

What is Meant by “Original” Death Certificate?

An original death certificate is the official record of death issued by a coroner, county medical examiner, or certified physician. 

Do Banks Need Original Death Certificates?

Generally speaking, no: a certified copy of a death certificate will generally be enough to settle a decedent’s bank account or settle any outstanding debts.

Estate Planning

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

Nash Riggins

November 25, 2023

|

original death certificate vs. certified copy

There are two types of death certificates you may end up getting asked for when settling a decedent’s business: an original death certificate and a certified copy. Both document types are used in several situations, but there are a few unique differences in terms of how they’re issued and what they look like.

This guide will break down those key differences, spell out when each certificate is used, and explain what to do if you lose a copy of someone’s original death certificate.

Key Takeaways

  • An original death certificate is issued by a medical professional and filed with the Vital Records Office, while a certified copy is an official duplicate of the original.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate includes an embossed seal and rubber stamp to prove its authenticity.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate is admissible as evidence in court and can generally be used to settle someone’s estate.

What's the Difference Between an Original Death Certificate and a Certified Copy?

difference between an original death certificate and a certified copy

There are a few key differences between an original death certificate and the certified copy of a death certificate. They center mainly around how each certificate is issued.

When someone dies, a death certificate must be issued. A death certificate is an official document issued by your local government confirming someone’s death and outlining key identifiers relating to the decedent and their passing.

Although every state has the power to issue death certificates in whatever format they choose, most states use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s U.S. Standard Death Certificate. In this document, you can expect to see basic information like the person’s name and last known address, time and place of death, and cause of death (if known).

After a death has taken place, an original death certificate is prepared. A coroner, certified physician, or county medical examiner typically carries out this task. Once completed, the original death certificate is filed with the relevant branch of the U.S. Vital Records Office.

An original death certificate is always filed in the state where the death occurred. Once reviewed and cataloged by government officials, the original death certificate serves as the authoritative record of someone’s death. It won’t typically leave the Vital Records Office after being filed.

Instead, most authorities will issue a death certificate to the decedent’s next of kin. These are typically given to funeral homes and then passed on to the decedent’s family after the funeral takes place.

It’s possible to request additional death certificates from the Vital Records Office, but these additional certificates won’t be the original. Instead, you’ll be sent certified copies of the original death certificate.

Owner and attorney at Maison Law, Martin Gasparian, explains:

“A certified copy is just a copy of the original death certificate, but it has been verified by some with legal authority. The certifier must see the original document and the copy before signing it.”

Once a government registrar has viewed the original to confirm the copy is genuine, it’s given an embossed seal and stamp. This seal and stamp validate its authenticity as a certified copy of the original.

An original death certificate does not have an embossed seal and stamp. This is unique to certified copies.

When and Why Do These Differences Matter?

The difference matters as a certified copy is required for legal purposes as it includes a government seal showing that they are real and authentic,” Gasparian notes.

A certified copy is admissible as evidence in court proceedings. That means you’ll need a certified copy of a death certificate to settle any relevant probate hearings surrounding a decedent's estate.

You might also have to produce a certified copy of a death certificate to settle official government engagements or commercial transactions like closing a credit card account or bank account.

However, there are some situations where you’re required to provide an original death certificate.

Gasparian explains:

In case you are transferring the ownership of motor vehicles and real estate property, the legal paperwork requires you to produce an original death certificate rather than a certified copy. The original document also helps to prove that you are the legal beneficiary of the property.

What Should You Do If You Lose an Original Death Certificate?

what should you do if you lose an original death certificate

If you lose an original death certificate, don’t panic.

Financial Planner, Michael Ryan, advises:

If the original is lost, you can request a new certified copy from the Vital Records Office. While not ideal, the certified copy will suffice for most legal and administrative needs. The key is having an official death record validated by the government seal.”

Start by getting in touch with the Vital Records Office in the state where the death occurred. Each state has its own process in place for applying for a certified copy of the original death certificate held on file.

In most states, you’ll need to be a decedent's spouse, parent, child, sibling, or legal representative to obtain a certified copy. That being said, some states allow any member of the public to get a non-certified informational copy of a death certificate.

An informational copy has all the same information as the certified short-form copy of an original death certificate. But it doesn’t include the cause of death or important identifiers like the decedent’s Social Security Number (SSN).

Non-certified copies of a death certificate don’t hold any legal weight. They’re informational only.

To apply for a certified copy to use for legal purposes, you’ll typically have to fill out an application form that includes information about your relationship to the decedent. Additional documentation may be required, and most states charge a nominal fee to receive a new certified copy.

After receiving your certified copy, it’s critical to securely store it so it’s easy to access when called upon. If you’re collaborating with various law representatives, accountants, or business entities, it’s worth digitizing those copies so they’re easy to share.

For example, with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy, you can upload and store digital copies of all your essential family paperwork like death certificates, wills, identification documents and everything in between. Once uploaded, your family documents are protected by robust password recipes, two-factor authentication and AES 256-bit encryption.

It’s easy to grant individuals or parties access to certain documents where required. 

Suppose you’re trying to settle the estate of a loved one in probate court proceedings. In that case, you can quickly share access to digital copies of essential documents like a certified copy of a death certificate with your attorney.

Explore Trustyworthy’s range of features to learn more about how it can help you stay organized and keep tabs on important documents.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a Certified Copy of a Death Certificate as Good as the Original?

In most cases, yes: a certified copy of a death certificate holds legal weight and is admissible as evidence in court. An original may be needed to transfer assets like real estate.

What is Meant by “Original” Death Certificate?

An original death certificate is the official record of death issued by a coroner, county medical examiner, or certified physician. 

Do Banks Need Original Death Certificates?

Generally speaking, no: a certified copy of a death certificate will generally be enough to settle a decedent’s bank account or settle any outstanding debts.

Estate Planning

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

Nash Riggins

November 25, 2023

|

original death certificate vs. certified copy

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

There are two types of death certificates you may end up getting asked for when settling a decedent’s business: an original death certificate and a certified copy. Both document types are used in several situations, but there are a few unique differences in terms of how they’re issued and what they look like.

This guide will break down those key differences, spell out when each certificate is used, and explain what to do if you lose a copy of someone’s original death certificate.

Key Takeaways

  • An original death certificate is issued by a medical professional and filed with the Vital Records Office, while a certified copy is an official duplicate of the original.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate includes an embossed seal and rubber stamp to prove its authenticity.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate is admissible as evidence in court and can generally be used to settle someone’s estate.

What's the Difference Between an Original Death Certificate and a Certified Copy?

difference between an original death certificate and a certified copy

There are a few key differences between an original death certificate and the certified copy of a death certificate. They center mainly around how each certificate is issued.

When someone dies, a death certificate must be issued. A death certificate is an official document issued by your local government confirming someone’s death and outlining key identifiers relating to the decedent and their passing.

Although every state has the power to issue death certificates in whatever format they choose, most states use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s U.S. Standard Death Certificate. In this document, you can expect to see basic information like the person’s name and last known address, time and place of death, and cause of death (if known).

After a death has taken place, an original death certificate is prepared. A coroner, certified physician, or county medical examiner typically carries out this task. Once completed, the original death certificate is filed with the relevant branch of the U.S. Vital Records Office.

An original death certificate is always filed in the state where the death occurred. Once reviewed and cataloged by government officials, the original death certificate serves as the authoritative record of someone’s death. It won’t typically leave the Vital Records Office after being filed.

Instead, most authorities will issue a death certificate to the decedent’s next of kin. These are typically given to funeral homes and then passed on to the decedent’s family after the funeral takes place.

It’s possible to request additional death certificates from the Vital Records Office, but these additional certificates won’t be the original. Instead, you’ll be sent certified copies of the original death certificate.

Owner and attorney at Maison Law, Martin Gasparian, explains:

“A certified copy is just a copy of the original death certificate, but it has been verified by some with legal authority. The certifier must see the original document and the copy before signing it.”

Once a government registrar has viewed the original to confirm the copy is genuine, it’s given an embossed seal and stamp. This seal and stamp validate its authenticity as a certified copy of the original.

An original death certificate does not have an embossed seal and stamp. This is unique to certified copies.

When and Why Do These Differences Matter?

The difference matters as a certified copy is required for legal purposes as it includes a government seal showing that they are real and authentic,” Gasparian notes.

A certified copy is admissible as evidence in court proceedings. That means you’ll need a certified copy of a death certificate to settle any relevant probate hearings surrounding a decedent's estate.

You might also have to produce a certified copy of a death certificate to settle official government engagements or commercial transactions like closing a credit card account or bank account.

However, there are some situations where you’re required to provide an original death certificate.

Gasparian explains:

In case you are transferring the ownership of motor vehicles and real estate property, the legal paperwork requires you to produce an original death certificate rather than a certified copy. The original document also helps to prove that you are the legal beneficiary of the property.

What Should You Do If You Lose an Original Death Certificate?

what should you do if you lose an original death certificate

If you lose an original death certificate, don’t panic.

Financial Planner, Michael Ryan, advises:

If the original is lost, you can request a new certified copy from the Vital Records Office. While not ideal, the certified copy will suffice for most legal and administrative needs. The key is having an official death record validated by the government seal.”

Start by getting in touch with the Vital Records Office in the state where the death occurred. Each state has its own process in place for applying for a certified copy of the original death certificate held on file.

In most states, you’ll need to be a decedent's spouse, parent, child, sibling, or legal representative to obtain a certified copy. That being said, some states allow any member of the public to get a non-certified informational copy of a death certificate.

An informational copy has all the same information as the certified short-form copy of an original death certificate. But it doesn’t include the cause of death or important identifiers like the decedent’s Social Security Number (SSN).

Non-certified copies of a death certificate don’t hold any legal weight. They’re informational only.

To apply for a certified copy to use for legal purposes, you’ll typically have to fill out an application form that includes information about your relationship to the decedent. Additional documentation may be required, and most states charge a nominal fee to receive a new certified copy.

After receiving your certified copy, it’s critical to securely store it so it’s easy to access when called upon. If you’re collaborating with various law representatives, accountants, or business entities, it’s worth digitizing those copies so they’re easy to share.

For example, with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy, you can upload and store digital copies of all your essential family paperwork like death certificates, wills, identification documents and everything in between. Once uploaded, your family documents are protected by robust password recipes, two-factor authentication and AES 256-bit encryption.

It’s easy to grant individuals or parties access to certain documents where required. 

Suppose you’re trying to settle the estate of a loved one in probate court proceedings. In that case, you can quickly share access to digital copies of essential documents like a certified copy of a death certificate with your attorney.

Explore Trustyworthy’s range of features to learn more about how it can help you stay organized and keep tabs on important documents.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a Certified Copy of a Death Certificate as Good as the Original?

In most cases, yes: a certified copy of a death certificate holds legal weight and is admissible as evidence in court. An original may be needed to transfer assets like real estate.

What is Meant by “Original” Death Certificate?

An original death certificate is the official record of death issued by a coroner, county medical examiner, or certified physician. 

Do Banks Need Original Death Certificates?

Generally speaking, no: a certified copy of a death certificate will generally be enough to settle a decedent’s bank account or settle any outstanding debts.

Estate Planning

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

Nash Riggins

November 25, 2023

|

original death certificate vs. certified copy

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

There are two types of death certificates you may end up getting asked for when settling a decedent’s business: an original death certificate and a certified copy. Both document types are used in several situations, but there are a few unique differences in terms of how they’re issued and what they look like.

This guide will break down those key differences, spell out when each certificate is used, and explain what to do if you lose a copy of someone’s original death certificate.

Key Takeaways

  • An original death certificate is issued by a medical professional and filed with the Vital Records Office, while a certified copy is an official duplicate of the original.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate includes an embossed seal and rubber stamp to prove its authenticity.

  • A certified copy of a death certificate is admissible as evidence in court and can generally be used to settle someone’s estate.

What's the Difference Between an Original Death Certificate and a Certified Copy?

difference between an original death certificate and a certified copy

There are a few key differences between an original death certificate and the certified copy of a death certificate. They center mainly around how each certificate is issued.

When someone dies, a death certificate must be issued. A death certificate is an official document issued by your local government confirming someone’s death and outlining key identifiers relating to the decedent and their passing.

Although every state has the power to issue death certificates in whatever format they choose, most states use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s U.S. Standard Death Certificate. In this document, you can expect to see basic information like the person’s name and last known address, time and place of death, and cause of death (if known).

After a death has taken place, an original death certificate is prepared. A coroner, certified physician, or county medical examiner typically carries out this task. Once completed, the original death certificate is filed with the relevant branch of the U.S. Vital Records Office.

An original death certificate is always filed in the state where the death occurred. Once reviewed and cataloged by government officials, the original death certificate serves as the authoritative record of someone’s death. It won’t typically leave the Vital Records Office after being filed.

Instead, most authorities will issue a death certificate to the decedent’s next of kin. These are typically given to funeral homes and then passed on to the decedent’s family after the funeral takes place.

It’s possible to request additional death certificates from the Vital Records Office, but these additional certificates won’t be the original. Instead, you’ll be sent certified copies of the original death certificate.

Owner and attorney at Maison Law, Martin Gasparian, explains:

“A certified copy is just a copy of the original death certificate, but it has been verified by some with legal authority. The certifier must see the original document and the copy before signing it.”

Once a government registrar has viewed the original to confirm the copy is genuine, it’s given an embossed seal and stamp. This seal and stamp validate its authenticity as a certified copy of the original.

An original death certificate does not have an embossed seal and stamp. This is unique to certified copies.

When and Why Do These Differences Matter?

The difference matters as a certified copy is required for legal purposes as it includes a government seal showing that they are real and authentic,” Gasparian notes.

A certified copy is admissible as evidence in court proceedings. That means you’ll need a certified copy of a death certificate to settle any relevant probate hearings surrounding a decedent's estate.

You might also have to produce a certified copy of a death certificate to settle official government engagements or commercial transactions like closing a credit card account or bank account.

However, there are some situations where you’re required to provide an original death certificate.

Gasparian explains:

In case you are transferring the ownership of motor vehicles and real estate property, the legal paperwork requires you to produce an original death certificate rather than a certified copy. The original document also helps to prove that you are the legal beneficiary of the property.

What Should You Do If You Lose an Original Death Certificate?

what should you do if you lose an original death certificate

If you lose an original death certificate, don’t panic.

Financial Planner, Michael Ryan, advises:

If the original is lost, you can request a new certified copy from the Vital Records Office. While not ideal, the certified copy will suffice for most legal and administrative needs. The key is having an official death record validated by the government seal.”

Start by getting in touch with the Vital Records Office in the state where the death occurred. Each state has its own process in place for applying for a certified copy of the original death certificate held on file.

In most states, you’ll need to be a decedent's spouse, parent, child, sibling, or legal representative to obtain a certified copy. That being said, some states allow any member of the public to get a non-certified informational copy of a death certificate.

An informational copy has all the same information as the certified short-form copy of an original death certificate. But it doesn’t include the cause of death or important identifiers like the decedent’s Social Security Number (SSN).

Non-certified copies of a death certificate don’t hold any legal weight. They’re informational only.

To apply for a certified copy to use for legal purposes, you’ll typically have to fill out an application form that includes information about your relationship to the decedent. Additional documentation may be required, and most states charge a nominal fee to receive a new certified copy.

After receiving your certified copy, it’s critical to securely store it so it’s easy to access when called upon. If you’re collaborating with various law representatives, accountants, or business entities, it’s worth digitizing those copies so they’re easy to share.

For example, with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy, you can upload and store digital copies of all your essential family paperwork like death certificates, wills, identification documents and everything in between. Once uploaded, your family documents are protected by robust password recipes, two-factor authentication and AES 256-bit encryption.

It’s easy to grant individuals or parties access to certain documents where required. 

Suppose you’re trying to settle the estate of a loved one in probate court proceedings. In that case, you can quickly share access to digital copies of essential documents like a certified copy of a death certificate with your attorney.

Explore Trustyworthy’s range of features to learn more about how it can help you stay organized and keep tabs on important documents.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a Certified Copy of a Death Certificate as Good as the Original?

In most cases, yes: a certified copy of a death certificate holds legal weight and is admissible as evidence in court. An original may be needed to transfer assets like real estate.

What is Meant by “Original” Death Certificate?

An original death certificate is the official record of death issued by a coroner, county medical examiner, or certified physician. 

Do Banks Need Original Death Certificates?

Generally speaking, no: a certified copy of a death certificate will generally be enough to settle a decedent’s bank account or settle any outstanding debts.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

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Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

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Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

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A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them
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A couple in a meeting with a professional
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Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

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