Information Management

Lost Your Social Security Card: Here’s Your Next Step

Joel Lim

|

May 22, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

lost your social security card

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Keeping your Social Security card is so important for the safety of your personal and financial information, but sometimes the worst can happen, and you misplace it. 

The good news is, replacing a Social Security card is not particularly complicated and can be done online. We’ll explain the exact steps to take if you lose your Social Security card.


Key Takeaways 

  • If you lose your Social Security card, you can use an Identity Protection service, get a replacement card, file a police report, and freeze your credit.

  • You don’t need a physical card if you know your number and have documents that contain your Social Security number.

  • Keep your Social Security number safe by storing it with Trustworthy and being cautious when online.


Lost Your Social Security Card? Here’s What to Do

lost your social security card

Even the most organized person can lose their Social Security card, but it’s crucial not to panic. Follow the steps below, and use a family-operating system like Trustworthy to store all your important documents and information in one centralized, secure location.  

Use an Identity Protection Service  

Unfortunately, losing your Social Security card puts your personal information at serious risk of identity theft, and the biggest risk is access to your money.

Your first step after noticing your card is lost is using an Identity Protection Service. This service monitors credit applications, websites, chat rooms, black market websites, and credit applications for unusual activity. These services are great for monitoring identity theft signs, but they can also assist with some out-of-pocket losses associated with identity theft. 

Identity Protection Services also offers additional services like credit monitoring. They will monitor your credit history and provide periodic credit scores so they can quickly spot any unusual credit activity.    

Check and Freeze Your Credit 

Because a lost Social Security card puts you at risk for identity theft, you should check and freeze your credit immediately. 

Daniel Rosen, the founder of Credit Repair Cloud explains:

“A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report and prevents new accounts from being opened in your name without your permission… You can freeze your credit for free with Equifax, Experian, and Transunion.”

This essentially means freezing your credit. Anyone with access to your Social Security Number (SSN) cannot use your card or any other personal information to take out loans or open accounts. A credit freeze will lock bankers and lenders from seeing your credit score, making it unlikely for them to approve loans. 

It can be applied as long as you feel your SSN is at risk and can be done through any major credit bureau. An additional step you can take is to alert your bank of what has happened. 

Replace Your Card 

If your card is lost and you need a physical copy, you’ll have to replace it with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Fortunately, there are multiple ways of doing this, including a convenient online method. 

To apply for a new card online, you must set up a My Social Security account or log in to your current account. Then, you must complete the online application by following the instructions provided. 

Other methods of applying for your replacement card include:

  • Visiting your nearest Social Security office.

  • Calling 1-800-772-1213.

  • Submitting your application via the mail.

Regardless of what method you use, a replacement card is free. Typically, the waiting period for a replacement card is between 7 and 10 business days, while mailed applications take longer, with a wait of up to 4 weeks. 

File a Police Report    

If you suspect you’re a victim or at risk for identity theft, you need to file a police report. This creates a legal record of the theft, which can be useful when dealing with the aftermath of identity theft. You can also file something called a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Identity Theft Report

Keep copies of these reports in a secure storage cloud like Trustworthy, which fully complies with data protection laws like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  

File a Fraud Alert 

In addition to freezing your credit and filing a police report, you should also issue a fraud alert on your credit. This means banks and other money lenders will be encouraged to take additional steps to ensure they verify your identity before approving loans or new lines of credit. 

Fraud alerts are free to implement and can last up to a year. There is also the option to issue an extended fraud alert, which can last for seven years. To issue an alert, you can contact one of three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. Whoever you notify will notify the two other bureaus on your behalf. 

Call The IRS 

Another thing you can do if your Social Security card is lost is call the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Typically, you’ll receive a notice from the IRS if they suspect someone has been using your SSN fraudulently. If you didn’t receive a notice, you’ll need to complete Form 14039, which is the Identity Theft Affidavit.   


Do You Need a Physical SSN Card?

do you need a physical ssn card

Losing your physical card is no reason to panic if you believe your SSN is still confidential. You don’t actually need the card if you know your SSN. 

For example, if you don’t have your physical card, you can use a document with your SSN, like tax documents, pay stubs, and a Social Security Benefit Statement. For many places, just knowing your SSN is proof enough. 


Steps to Safeguard Your Social Security Card Moving Forward

You can take some steps to ensure the safety of your Social Security card, and some of these steps are very easy to follow. 

Use Trustworthy 

use trustworthy

Rest assured, all your important information, including your SSN, can be securely stored on a reliable platform like Trustworthy. 

Never worry about your personal information going missing because Trustworthy has advanced security measures and is fully SOC2 Type 2 and SOC3 certified. Some security features include multi-factor authentication, biometric autofiction, data encryption using AES 256-bit encryption, tokenization, and on-screen redaction. 

Be Cautious Online & Limit Sharing

As with anything you do online, you should take extra care to remain cautious and limit your sharing of personal information. Talking to strangers is easy, but that doesn’t mean you should overshare, as that can put your personal information at risk. Be wary of websites asking for sensitive personal information, as this can be a form of cybercrime. 

Monitor Credit & Statements Closely

Regardless of whether your card is missing, you must regularly monitor your credit and statements closely. It’s not uncommon for thieves to put through small amounts of purchases because they’re less likely to draw attention, and this can add up after a couple of months. You can hire a credit monitoring service to do this for you. 

Use Strong Passwords & 2FA Online

When you’re online, keeping yourself and your sensitive personal information safe means using security measures like Two-factor authentication (2FA), where users need to enter the correct password and a one-time-use code. Without the code, access is not granted. 

Also use a strong password with at least 8 characters and a unique mixture of letters, symbols and numbers. Avoid using pet names or birthdays as your password. 

Be Aware of Common Scams

There is no shortage of scams targeting Social Security numbers, and knowing what to be on the lookout for is a good way of ensuring you don’t get caught. One common scam is thieves who call pretending to be from the Social Security Administration to try and get your SSN. Be aware of fake emails that are phishing for information. 


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Should I worry if I lose my Social Security card?

Losing your Social Security card puts your sensitive and financial information at serious risk for identity theft. To avoid worrying about this, you should freeze your credit, file a police report, and issue a fraud alert. 

How do I protect my Social Security card?

Protect your Social Security card by keeping it somewhere secure and only using it when absolutely needed. You don’t need the physical card for most things if you know the number. 

How can I prove my Social Security number without a card?

To prove your SSN without the card, you can use documents that have your SSN, such as pay stubs, tax documents, and financial documents. 

Can someone else get a replacement Social Security card for me?

You can complete a replacement card application for someone else as long as you can provide evidence that you have authority. You’ll also need an identity document for yourself and the applicant. 

Information Management

Lost Your Social Security Card: Here’s Your Next Step

Joel Lim

|

May 22, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

Keeping your Social Security card is so important for the safety of your personal and financial information, but sometimes the worst can happen, and you misplace it. 

The good news is, replacing a Social Security card is not particularly complicated and can be done online. We’ll explain the exact steps to take if you lose your Social Security card.


Key Takeaways 

  • If you lose your Social Security card, you can use an Identity Protection service, get a replacement card, file a police report, and freeze your credit.

  • You don’t need a physical card if you know your number and have documents that contain your Social Security number.

  • Keep your Social Security number safe by storing it with Trustworthy and being cautious when online.


Lost Your Social Security Card? Here’s What to Do

lost your social security card

Even the most organized person can lose their Social Security card, but it’s crucial not to panic. Follow the steps below, and use a family-operating system like Trustworthy to store all your important documents and information in one centralized, secure location.  

Use an Identity Protection Service  

Unfortunately, losing your Social Security card puts your personal information at serious risk of identity theft, and the biggest risk is access to your money.

Your first step after noticing your card is lost is using an Identity Protection Service. This service monitors credit applications, websites, chat rooms, black market websites, and credit applications for unusual activity. These services are great for monitoring identity theft signs, but they can also assist with some out-of-pocket losses associated with identity theft. 

Identity Protection Services also offers additional services like credit monitoring. They will monitor your credit history and provide periodic credit scores so they can quickly spot any unusual credit activity.    

Check and Freeze Your Credit 

Because a lost Social Security card puts you at risk for identity theft, you should check and freeze your credit immediately. 

Daniel Rosen, the founder of Credit Repair Cloud explains:

“A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report and prevents new accounts from being opened in your name without your permission… You can freeze your credit for free with Equifax, Experian, and Transunion.”

This essentially means freezing your credit. Anyone with access to your Social Security Number (SSN) cannot use your card or any other personal information to take out loans or open accounts. A credit freeze will lock bankers and lenders from seeing your credit score, making it unlikely for them to approve loans. 

It can be applied as long as you feel your SSN is at risk and can be done through any major credit bureau. An additional step you can take is to alert your bank of what has happened. 

Replace Your Card 

If your card is lost and you need a physical copy, you’ll have to replace it with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Fortunately, there are multiple ways of doing this, including a convenient online method. 

To apply for a new card online, you must set up a My Social Security account or log in to your current account. Then, you must complete the online application by following the instructions provided. 

Other methods of applying for your replacement card include:

  • Visiting your nearest Social Security office.

  • Calling 1-800-772-1213.

  • Submitting your application via the mail.

Regardless of what method you use, a replacement card is free. Typically, the waiting period for a replacement card is between 7 and 10 business days, while mailed applications take longer, with a wait of up to 4 weeks. 

File a Police Report    

If you suspect you’re a victim or at risk for identity theft, you need to file a police report. This creates a legal record of the theft, which can be useful when dealing with the aftermath of identity theft. You can also file something called a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Identity Theft Report

Keep copies of these reports in a secure storage cloud like Trustworthy, which fully complies with data protection laws like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  

File a Fraud Alert 

In addition to freezing your credit and filing a police report, you should also issue a fraud alert on your credit. This means banks and other money lenders will be encouraged to take additional steps to ensure they verify your identity before approving loans or new lines of credit. 

Fraud alerts are free to implement and can last up to a year. There is also the option to issue an extended fraud alert, which can last for seven years. To issue an alert, you can contact one of three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. Whoever you notify will notify the two other bureaus on your behalf. 

Call The IRS 

Another thing you can do if your Social Security card is lost is call the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Typically, you’ll receive a notice from the IRS if they suspect someone has been using your SSN fraudulently. If you didn’t receive a notice, you’ll need to complete Form 14039, which is the Identity Theft Affidavit.   


Do You Need a Physical SSN Card?

do you need a physical ssn card

Losing your physical card is no reason to panic if you believe your SSN is still confidential. You don’t actually need the card if you know your SSN. 

For example, if you don’t have your physical card, you can use a document with your SSN, like tax documents, pay stubs, and a Social Security Benefit Statement. For many places, just knowing your SSN is proof enough. 


Steps to Safeguard Your Social Security Card Moving Forward

You can take some steps to ensure the safety of your Social Security card, and some of these steps are very easy to follow. 

Use Trustworthy 

use trustworthy

Rest assured, all your important information, including your SSN, can be securely stored on a reliable platform like Trustworthy. 

Never worry about your personal information going missing because Trustworthy has advanced security measures and is fully SOC2 Type 2 and SOC3 certified. Some security features include multi-factor authentication, biometric autofiction, data encryption using AES 256-bit encryption, tokenization, and on-screen redaction. 

Be Cautious Online & Limit Sharing

As with anything you do online, you should take extra care to remain cautious and limit your sharing of personal information. Talking to strangers is easy, but that doesn’t mean you should overshare, as that can put your personal information at risk. Be wary of websites asking for sensitive personal information, as this can be a form of cybercrime. 

Monitor Credit & Statements Closely

Regardless of whether your card is missing, you must regularly monitor your credit and statements closely. It’s not uncommon for thieves to put through small amounts of purchases because they’re less likely to draw attention, and this can add up after a couple of months. You can hire a credit monitoring service to do this for you. 

Use Strong Passwords & 2FA Online

When you’re online, keeping yourself and your sensitive personal information safe means using security measures like Two-factor authentication (2FA), where users need to enter the correct password and a one-time-use code. Without the code, access is not granted. 

Also use a strong password with at least 8 characters and a unique mixture of letters, symbols and numbers. Avoid using pet names or birthdays as your password. 

Be Aware of Common Scams

There is no shortage of scams targeting Social Security numbers, and knowing what to be on the lookout for is a good way of ensuring you don’t get caught. One common scam is thieves who call pretending to be from the Social Security Administration to try and get your SSN. Be aware of fake emails that are phishing for information. 


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Should I worry if I lose my Social Security card?

Losing your Social Security card puts your sensitive and financial information at serious risk for identity theft. To avoid worrying about this, you should freeze your credit, file a police report, and issue a fraud alert. 

How do I protect my Social Security card?

Protect your Social Security card by keeping it somewhere secure and only using it when absolutely needed. You don’t need the physical card for most things if you know the number. 

How can I prove my Social Security number without a card?

To prove your SSN without the card, you can use documents that have your SSN, such as pay stubs, tax documents, and financial documents. 

Can someone else get a replacement Social Security card for me?

You can complete a replacement card application for someone else as long as you can provide evidence that you have authority. You’ll also need an identity document for yourself and the applicant. 

Information Management

Lost Your Social Security Card: Here’s Your Next Step

Joel Lim

|

May 22, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

lost your social security card

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Keeping your Social Security card is so important for the safety of your personal and financial information, but sometimes the worst can happen, and you misplace it. 

The good news is, replacing a Social Security card is not particularly complicated and can be done online. We’ll explain the exact steps to take if you lose your Social Security card.


Key Takeaways 

  • If you lose your Social Security card, you can use an Identity Protection service, get a replacement card, file a police report, and freeze your credit.

  • You don’t need a physical card if you know your number and have documents that contain your Social Security number.

  • Keep your Social Security number safe by storing it with Trustworthy and being cautious when online.


Lost Your Social Security Card? Here’s What to Do

lost your social security card

Even the most organized person can lose their Social Security card, but it’s crucial not to panic. Follow the steps below, and use a family-operating system like Trustworthy to store all your important documents and information in one centralized, secure location.  

Use an Identity Protection Service  

Unfortunately, losing your Social Security card puts your personal information at serious risk of identity theft, and the biggest risk is access to your money.

Your first step after noticing your card is lost is using an Identity Protection Service. This service monitors credit applications, websites, chat rooms, black market websites, and credit applications for unusual activity. These services are great for monitoring identity theft signs, but they can also assist with some out-of-pocket losses associated with identity theft. 

Identity Protection Services also offers additional services like credit monitoring. They will monitor your credit history and provide periodic credit scores so they can quickly spot any unusual credit activity.    

Check and Freeze Your Credit 

Because a lost Social Security card puts you at risk for identity theft, you should check and freeze your credit immediately. 

Daniel Rosen, the founder of Credit Repair Cloud explains:

“A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report and prevents new accounts from being opened in your name without your permission… You can freeze your credit for free with Equifax, Experian, and Transunion.”

This essentially means freezing your credit. Anyone with access to your Social Security Number (SSN) cannot use your card or any other personal information to take out loans or open accounts. A credit freeze will lock bankers and lenders from seeing your credit score, making it unlikely for them to approve loans. 

It can be applied as long as you feel your SSN is at risk and can be done through any major credit bureau. An additional step you can take is to alert your bank of what has happened. 

Replace Your Card 

If your card is lost and you need a physical copy, you’ll have to replace it with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Fortunately, there are multiple ways of doing this, including a convenient online method. 

To apply for a new card online, you must set up a My Social Security account or log in to your current account. Then, you must complete the online application by following the instructions provided. 

Other methods of applying for your replacement card include:

  • Visiting your nearest Social Security office.

  • Calling 1-800-772-1213.

  • Submitting your application via the mail.

Regardless of what method you use, a replacement card is free. Typically, the waiting period for a replacement card is between 7 and 10 business days, while mailed applications take longer, with a wait of up to 4 weeks. 

File a Police Report    

If you suspect you’re a victim or at risk for identity theft, you need to file a police report. This creates a legal record of the theft, which can be useful when dealing with the aftermath of identity theft. You can also file something called a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Identity Theft Report

Keep copies of these reports in a secure storage cloud like Trustworthy, which fully complies with data protection laws like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  

File a Fraud Alert 

In addition to freezing your credit and filing a police report, you should also issue a fraud alert on your credit. This means banks and other money lenders will be encouraged to take additional steps to ensure they verify your identity before approving loans or new lines of credit. 

Fraud alerts are free to implement and can last up to a year. There is also the option to issue an extended fraud alert, which can last for seven years. To issue an alert, you can contact one of three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. Whoever you notify will notify the two other bureaus on your behalf. 

Call The IRS 

Another thing you can do if your Social Security card is lost is call the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Typically, you’ll receive a notice from the IRS if they suspect someone has been using your SSN fraudulently. If you didn’t receive a notice, you’ll need to complete Form 14039, which is the Identity Theft Affidavit.   


Do You Need a Physical SSN Card?

do you need a physical ssn card

Losing your physical card is no reason to panic if you believe your SSN is still confidential. You don’t actually need the card if you know your SSN. 

For example, if you don’t have your physical card, you can use a document with your SSN, like tax documents, pay stubs, and a Social Security Benefit Statement. For many places, just knowing your SSN is proof enough. 


Steps to Safeguard Your Social Security Card Moving Forward

You can take some steps to ensure the safety of your Social Security card, and some of these steps are very easy to follow. 

Use Trustworthy 

use trustworthy

Rest assured, all your important information, including your SSN, can be securely stored on a reliable platform like Trustworthy. 

Never worry about your personal information going missing because Trustworthy has advanced security measures and is fully SOC2 Type 2 and SOC3 certified. Some security features include multi-factor authentication, biometric autofiction, data encryption using AES 256-bit encryption, tokenization, and on-screen redaction. 

Be Cautious Online & Limit Sharing

As with anything you do online, you should take extra care to remain cautious and limit your sharing of personal information. Talking to strangers is easy, but that doesn’t mean you should overshare, as that can put your personal information at risk. Be wary of websites asking for sensitive personal information, as this can be a form of cybercrime. 

Monitor Credit & Statements Closely

Regardless of whether your card is missing, you must regularly monitor your credit and statements closely. It’s not uncommon for thieves to put through small amounts of purchases because they’re less likely to draw attention, and this can add up after a couple of months. You can hire a credit monitoring service to do this for you. 

Use Strong Passwords & 2FA Online

When you’re online, keeping yourself and your sensitive personal information safe means using security measures like Two-factor authentication (2FA), where users need to enter the correct password and a one-time-use code. Without the code, access is not granted. 

Also use a strong password with at least 8 characters and a unique mixture of letters, symbols and numbers. Avoid using pet names or birthdays as your password. 

Be Aware of Common Scams

There is no shortage of scams targeting Social Security numbers, and knowing what to be on the lookout for is a good way of ensuring you don’t get caught. One common scam is thieves who call pretending to be from the Social Security Administration to try and get your SSN. Be aware of fake emails that are phishing for information. 


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Should I worry if I lose my Social Security card?

Losing your Social Security card puts your sensitive and financial information at serious risk for identity theft. To avoid worrying about this, you should freeze your credit, file a police report, and issue a fraud alert. 

How do I protect my Social Security card?

Protect your Social Security card by keeping it somewhere secure and only using it when absolutely needed. You don’t need the physical card for most things if you know the number. 

How can I prove my Social Security number without a card?

To prove your SSN without the card, you can use documents that have your SSN, such as pay stubs, tax documents, and financial documents. 

Can someone else get a replacement Social Security card for me?

You can complete a replacement card application for someone else as long as you can provide evidence that you have authority. You’ll also need an identity document for yourself and the applicant. 

Information Management

Lost Your Social Security Card: Here’s Your Next Step

Joel Lim

|

May 22, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

lost your social security card

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Keeping your Social Security card is so important for the safety of your personal and financial information, but sometimes the worst can happen, and you misplace it. 

The good news is, replacing a Social Security card is not particularly complicated and can be done online. We’ll explain the exact steps to take if you lose your Social Security card.


Key Takeaways 

  • If you lose your Social Security card, you can use an Identity Protection service, get a replacement card, file a police report, and freeze your credit.

  • You don’t need a physical card if you know your number and have documents that contain your Social Security number.

  • Keep your Social Security number safe by storing it with Trustworthy and being cautious when online.


Lost Your Social Security Card? Here’s What to Do

lost your social security card

Even the most organized person can lose their Social Security card, but it’s crucial not to panic. Follow the steps below, and use a family-operating system like Trustworthy to store all your important documents and information in one centralized, secure location.  

Use an Identity Protection Service  

Unfortunately, losing your Social Security card puts your personal information at serious risk of identity theft, and the biggest risk is access to your money.

Your first step after noticing your card is lost is using an Identity Protection Service. This service monitors credit applications, websites, chat rooms, black market websites, and credit applications for unusual activity. These services are great for monitoring identity theft signs, but they can also assist with some out-of-pocket losses associated with identity theft. 

Identity Protection Services also offers additional services like credit monitoring. They will monitor your credit history and provide periodic credit scores so they can quickly spot any unusual credit activity.    

Check and Freeze Your Credit 

Because a lost Social Security card puts you at risk for identity theft, you should check and freeze your credit immediately. 

Daniel Rosen, the founder of Credit Repair Cloud explains:

“A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report and prevents new accounts from being opened in your name without your permission… You can freeze your credit for free with Equifax, Experian, and Transunion.”

This essentially means freezing your credit. Anyone with access to your Social Security Number (SSN) cannot use your card or any other personal information to take out loans or open accounts. A credit freeze will lock bankers and lenders from seeing your credit score, making it unlikely for them to approve loans. 

It can be applied as long as you feel your SSN is at risk and can be done through any major credit bureau. An additional step you can take is to alert your bank of what has happened. 

Replace Your Card 

If your card is lost and you need a physical copy, you’ll have to replace it with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Fortunately, there are multiple ways of doing this, including a convenient online method. 

To apply for a new card online, you must set up a My Social Security account or log in to your current account. Then, you must complete the online application by following the instructions provided. 

Other methods of applying for your replacement card include:

  • Visiting your nearest Social Security office.

  • Calling 1-800-772-1213.

  • Submitting your application via the mail.

Regardless of what method you use, a replacement card is free. Typically, the waiting period for a replacement card is between 7 and 10 business days, while mailed applications take longer, with a wait of up to 4 weeks. 

File a Police Report    

If you suspect you’re a victim or at risk for identity theft, you need to file a police report. This creates a legal record of the theft, which can be useful when dealing with the aftermath of identity theft. You can also file something called a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Identity Theft Report

Keep copies of these reports in a secure storage cloud like Trustworthy, which fully complies with data protection laws like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).  

File a Fraud Alert 

In addition to freezing your credit and filing a police report, you should also issue a fraud alert on your credit. This means banks and other money lenders will be encouraged to take additional steps to ensure they verify your identity before approving loans or new lines of credit. 

Fraud alerts are free to implement and can last up to a year. There is also the option to issue an extended fraud alert, which can last for seven years. To issue an alert, you can contact one of three credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, or TransUnion. Whoever you notify will notify the two other bureaus on your behalf. 

Call The IRS 

Another thing you can do if your Social Security card is lost is call the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Typically, you’ll receive a notice from the IRS if they suspect someone has been using your SSN fraudulently. If you didn’t receive a notice, you’ll need to complete Form 14039, which is the Identity Theft Affidavit.   


Do You Need a Physical SSN Card?

do you need a physical ssn card

Losing your physical card is no reason to panic if you believe your SSN is still confidential. You don’t actually need the card if you know your SSN. 

For example, if you don’t have your physical card, you can use a document with your SSN, like tax documents, pay stubs, and a Social Security Benefit Statement. For many places, just knowing your SSN is proof enough. 


Steps to Safeguard Your Social Security Card Moving Forward

You can take some steps to ensure the safety of your Social Security card, and some of these steps are very easy to follow. 

Use Trustworthy 

use trustworthy

Rest assured, all your important information, including your SSN, can be securely stored on a reliable platform like Trustworthy. 

Never worry about your personal information going missing because Trustworthy has advanced security measures and is fully SOC2 Type 2 and SOC3 certified. Some security features include multi-factor authentication, biometric autofiction, data encryption using AES 256-bit encryption, tokenization, and on-screen redaction. 

Be Cautious Online & Limit Sharing

As with anything you do online, you should take extra care to remain cautious and limit your sharing of personal information. Talking to strangers is easy, but that doesn’t mean you should overshare, as that can put your personal information at risk. Be wary of websites asking for sensitive personal information, as this can be a form of cybercrime. 

Monitor Credit & Statements Closely

Regardless of whether your card is missing, you must regularly monitor your credit and statements closely. It’s not uncommon for thieves to put through small amounts of purchases because they’re less likely to draw attention, and this can add up after a couple of months. You can hire a credit monitoring service to do this for you. 

Use Strong Passwords & 2FA Online

When you’re online, keeping yourself and your sensitive personal information safe means using security measures like Two-factor authentication (2FA), where users need to enter the correct password and a one-time-use code. Without the code, access is not granted. 

Also use a strong password with at least 8 characters and a unique mixture of letters, symbols and numbers. Avoid using pet names or birthdays as your password. 

Be Aware of Common Scams

There is no shortage of scams targeting Social Security numbers, and knowing what to be on the lookout for is a good way of ensuring you don’t get caught. One common scam is thieves who call pretending to be from the Social Security Administration to try and get your SSN. Be aware of fake emails that are phishing for information. 


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Should I worry if I lose my Social Security card?

Losing your Social Security card puts your sensitive and financial information at serious risk for identity theft. To avoid worrying about this, you should freeze your credit, file a police report, and issue a fraud alert. 

How do I protect my Social Security card?

Protect your Social Security card by keeping it somewhere secure and only using it when absolutely needed. You don’t need the physical card for most things if you know the number. 

How can I prove my Social Security number without a card?

To prove your SSN without the card, you can use documents that have your SSN, such as pay stubs, tax documents, and financial documents. 

Can someone else get a replacement Social Security card for me?

You can complete a replacement card application for someone else as long as you can provide evidence that you have authority. You’ll also need an identity document for yourself and the applicant. 

Try Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

No credit card required.