Estate Planning

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

Too many individuals believe that wills and estate plans are only for those who have more wealth or heirs, run their own businesses, or take holidays in second homes.

However, as a lawyer, my advice is that the best time to start an estate plan, regardless of your net worth and assets, is now.  

There is no set age when you should start considering estate planning.  If you pass away without a plan in place, the government will decide who gets your belongings after a protracted and costly probate process. 

A simple will can ease future tension for your family members and offer them confidence that they are carrying out your instructions.

In this guide, I will cover all the information you need to know about when to begin estate planning, including:

  • When is an estate plan required?

  • What happens to my assets when I’m gone?

  • When should I name a guardian?

  • When should I change my estate plan?

When Is an Estate Plan Required?

Many financial consultants advise that an estate plan is required as soon as you reach legal adulthood and to update it every 3 to 5 years afterward.

This is because you are now legally responsible for your money, healthcare (in some areas), and power of attorney at 18. You want to ensure that everything is in order regularly.

What Exactly Is an Estate Plan?

Estate planning entails the creation of several documents that will not only have a significant impact on you while you are alive but also on what happens after your death. 

Most people know that a will, which specifies how your possessions and assets are distributed after your death, is a component of an estate plan. 

A will also allows you to choose the executor who will take care of your business after your passing and name a guardian for your minor children.

Other legal documents that you might require at any time, without warning, are included in an estate plan. An advance directive, also called a living will, outlines your preferences for medical care, including life support and feeding tubes, should you become incapacitated. 

What Happens to My Assets When I’m Gone?

The departed person's estate must pay all unpaid obligations. Assets belong to the estate of the deceased when they die.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

Your state's intestacy law decides who gets your possessions if you don't make a will. 

Your entire estate normally goes to the state if no relatives can be located. This applies to IRAs, retirement funds, and bank accounts.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

When to Name a Guardian

It is always a good idea to start considering who you would name as your first child's guardian if something unexpected happened to you. 

Although most new parents prefer not to think about this, it is important to put it in writing. 

Usually, when you write a will, you designate a guardian. 

It's critical to keep in mind that every time you have a new baby, this paperwork needs to be updated. 

Trustworthy can help you with this process. You can access, share, and modify your documents by simply signing into your account.

When to Draft a Will

Last will and testament

As soon as you attain legal adulthood is the optimal time to prepare a will.

Unfortunately, many people in America die without leaving a will. 

Family members are left dealing with death while also being in charge of many choices they might not have thought about. 

Drafting a will can help you avoid this scenario by allowing you to designate a healthcare proxy, set a power of attorney, and determine how your investments and finances will be allocated.

When to Make a Trust

It might be appropriate to form your trust if you have important assets, such as real estate or other assets. 

Trusts can help you avoid probate and give you more authority over how your assets are dispersed during your lifetime and after your passing. 

Additionally, setting up a trust helps you avoid extra taxes or charges as your assets are distributed to different beneficiaries.

Creating a Power of Attorney

When you cannot manage your finances, such as paying your bills and managing your money, a power of attorney allows someone else to do so on your behalf. 

If you cannot make decisions for yourself, these documents allow you to control what happens to you and your affairs throughout your life.

When to Change Your Estate Plan

Man looking at will

Experts advise reviewing your estate plan every 3 to 5 years or anytime there is a significant change in your life. 

The following life events typically indicate that your estate plan needs to be updated.

The Arrival of Children

To ensure that your children have a legal guardian in place and will have financial security after your passing, they must be accurately represented in your will (or trust). 

Additionally, updating your documentation is crucial whenever new family members (often grandkids) are born who you want to identify as beneficiaries.

Marriage & Remarriage

Marriage frequently results in shared property ownership between husband and wife and can occasionally result in the drafting of joint trusts or joint wills. 

You must amend your documentation when assets are no longer shared with a previous spouse.

Before Traveling

It is advised to update your estate plan before significant travel, especially if you frequently leave the country or travel extensively.

If anything were to happen to you while traveling abroad, you’d want to have your affairs in order. 

After Inheriting Money or Other Assets

If applicable, update your will (and any trusts) if you unexpectedly acquire new property or funds that raise your estate's value to ensure everything is covered.

Probate Concerns

Having an estate plan will help you cut down on the probate process' delays, costs, and privacy invasions. The following issues with probate include:

  • Privacy loss: The probate court is open to the public. For instance, family members and creditors might obtain your probate papers to contest your will.

  • Cost: Probate costs can be expensive, even in the simplest scenarios. Up to 5% of the assets of an estate may be required to cover legal fees and court costs.

  • Delays: An uncontested probate, on average, could take more than one year. These hold-ups, expenses, and invasions of privacy can frequently be avoided with careful planning.

Preparing for Incapacity 

Estate planning is sometimes viewed as a process that must be completed to prepare for what will occur after your death. However, documentation in the event of your incapacity is a crucial element of estate planning.

If you cannot handle your financial affairs on your own, you can designate someone with the use of a financial power of attorney. This can go into action immediately after you sign it, or it can "spring," which means it takes effect after you become incapable. 

Be sure to inquire about any policies or restrictions your financial services provider may have about the acceptance of springing powers of attorney.

A living will, HIPAA authorization (a detailed document that ensures the privacy of your medical records), and power of attorney for health care (sometimes referred to as a "health care proxy") are all documents that allow someone to make medical decisions on your behalf. 

Consider hiring an attorney to draft these documents if you don't already have them. If the first person you designate cannot serve, you may want to name a backup. 

If you already have these documents, review them to make sure the person(s) identified on them still sits well with you, and work with your lawyer to ensure they are up to date and correctly reflect your wishes.

Charitable Goals

Married couple signing will

There are many ways to include charitable goals in an estate plan if the estate has significant assets and the owner wants to donate to charity. 

Even though charities can be listed as beneficiaries, it may be more advantageous from a tax standpoint to leave the charity non-Roth IRA assets and assets that pass through your will to specific people.

From a tax viewpoint, designating your preferred trust or charity as a primary or contingent beneficiary may be more advantageous. You may designate a particular portion of your retirement plan assets to go to charity, for instance. 

Or, if you want to create a lifetime income stream for a charity, consider creating a charitable lead trust (CLT). If the CLT were correctly constructed, the balance would be distributed to the grantor's beneficiaries after termination.

The beneficiaries of a properly drafted charitable remainder trust (CRT) would receive an income stream. In contrast, the grantor (who founded the trust) is still alive, with the remaining assets going to the grantor's preferred charity. 

Both CLT and CRT have several advantages, some of which include the following:

  1. Lowering or eliminating capital gains taxes on appreciated assets

  2. Claiming charitable contributions as income tax deductions

  3. Lowering the estate tax

  4. Donating to your preferred cause

You can sort through the possibilities that might be ideal for you with an attorney or tax expert.

Business Succession

Have you thought about how to plan for your business after your passing? 

If you intend to retain it inside the family, think about setting up a structure that will make it simpler for family members to inherit the company's assets, like a family limited partnership or a family limited liability corporation.

There are a lot of choices. Your lawyer or tax expert can assist you in making the best choice for you, given your circumstances.

Families with Special Needs

Concerning disabilities, particular trusts are established for a beneficiary who is disabled, organized in a way that permits the beneficiary to continue to be eligible for government benefits like Social Security Disability Insurance

Once more, a lawyer can assist in creating a trust that will suit your unique circumstances.

Start Estate Planning as Soon as Possible

Many professionals advise making an estate plan as soon as you reach legal adulthood and updating it periodically (or whenever you encounter major life changes).

An overview of estate planning by age is provided here:

In Your 20’s and 30’s

In their 20s and 30s, nobody wants to think about dying, but you should prepare for the unexpected. 

Even though it seems implausible, it's a good idea to put your affairs in order in case the unthinkable happens. 

Since your estate plan will probably be relatively straightforward, there's no need to spend a lot of money on it now. This strategy can be updated as your affairs become more intricate.

During this time, think about drafting the following documents as part of your estate plan (they are necessary regardless of your wealth or assets):

  • Healthcare power of attorney: Having a Healthcare POA in place assures that someone you trust will have the legal ability to make these decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated and unable to make them for yourself.

  • Durable power of attorney: A durable power of attorney will give someone you trust the legal power to handle your personal affairs, make payments on your behalf, and speak on your behalf if you become incapacitated.

  • Will: If you have kids, you should have a will since it enables you to designate a guardian for your minor kids. A will also allows you to give your property to unmarried partners who would not otherwise be eligible for an inheritance. 

  • Living will: If you become mentally incompetent, a living will enables you to specify your intentions for your medical care. This is different from a healthcare POA, which gives someone else the authority to make decisions for you. If you are diagnosed with a fatal illness or become incompetent, a living will comes into play to ensure your wishes are honored.

In Your 40’s

The same documents are equally crucial when you approach your 40s. Your circumstances may now be more complicated, and your desires may have altered. 

For instance, you might want to update your power of attorney or modify who your children's legal guardian is. You should update this paperwork in your 40s.

Additionally, consider creating a trust if you amass more assets. Using a trust, you can exert more influence over how your assets are distributed. 

A trust can enable you to include conditions like the requirement that your children use their inheritance money for educational costs or the ability to decide when they receive it. 

Additionally, creating a trust will help you avoid probate.

In Your 50’s and 60’s

By the time you reach 50 or 60, you won't be overly concerned if you start estate planning in your 20s. Considering your present health conditions and age, reviewing some of your estate planning documents that pertain to your healthcare may be wise.

It's a good idea to review your living will and any existing powers of attorney to ensure they still accurately reflect your objectives.

It's never too late to start estate planning if you didn't do so while you were in your 20s. If you haven't already, getting the aforementioned papers organized at this time in your life is more crucial than ever.

Related: Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Share Your Wishes and Estate Plan through Trustworthy

Trustworthy dashboard

One of the most crucial steps you can take to safeguard yourself, your family, and your future is estate planning. 

Trustworthy makes it easy to share your will or update your final intentions. 

It's a good idea to share your estate planning documents as soon as one of the milestones listed above approaches.

Trustworthy gives you and your family a streamlined place to review and revisit your estate planning documents when your situation changes for better or for worse. 

It's best to prepare for the unexpected and ensure your estate plan is in the right hands as soon as possible.

Try a 14-day free trial with Trustworthy today. 

Other Estate Planning Resources

Estate Planning

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

Too many individuals believe that wills and estate plans are only for those who have more wealth or heirs, run their own businesses, or take holidays in second homes.

However, as a lawyer, my advice is that the best time to start an estate plan, regardless of your net worth and assets, is now.  

There is no set age when you should start considering estate planning.  If you pass away without a plan in place, the government will decide who gets your belongings after a protracted and costly probate process. 

A simple will can ease future tension for your family members and offer them confidence that they are carrying out your instructions.

In this guide, I will cover all the information you need to know about when to begin estate planning, including:

  • When is an estate plan required?

  • What happens to my assets when I’m gone?

  • When should I name a guardian?

  • When should I change my estate plan?

When Is an Estate Plan Required?

Many financial consultants advise that an estate plan is required as soon as you reach legal adulthood and to update it every 3 to 5 years afterward.

This is because you are now legally responsible for your money, healthcare (in some areas), and power of attorney at 18. You want to ensure that everything is in order regularly.

What Exactly Is an Estate Plan?

Estate planning entails the creation of several documents that will not only have a significant impact on you while you are alive but also on what happens after your death. 

Most people know that a will, which specifies how your possessions and assets are distributed after your death, is a component of an estate plan. 

A will also allows you to choose the executor who will take care of your business after your passing and name a guardian for your minor children.

Other legal documents that you might require at any time, without warning, are included in an estate plan. An advance directive, also called a living will, outlines your preferences for medical care, including life support and feeding tubes, should you become incapacitated. 

What Happens to My Assets When I’m Gone?

The departed person's estate must pay all unpaid obligations. Assets belong to the estate of the deceased when they die.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

Your state's intestacy law decides who gets your possessions if you don't make a will. 

Your entire estate normally goes to the state if no relatives can be located. This applies to IRAs, retirement funds, and bank accounts.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

When to Name a Guardian

It is always a good idea to start considering who you would name as your first child's guardian if something unexpected happened to you. 

Although most new parents prefer not to think about this, it is important to put it in writing. 

Usually, when you write a will, you designate a guardian. 

It's critical to keep in mind that every time you have a new baby, this paperwork needs to be updated. 

Trustworthy can help you with this process. You can access, share, and modify your documents by simply signing into your account.

When to Draft a Will

Last will and testament

As soon as you attain legal adulthood is the optimal time to prepare a will.

Unfortunately, many people in America die without leaving a will. 

Family members are left dealing with death while also being in charge of many choices they might not have thought about. 

Drafting a will can help you avoid this scenario by allowing you to designate a healthcare proxy, set a power of attorney, and determine how your investments and finances will be allocated.

When to Make a Trust

It might be appropriate to form your trust if you have important assets, such as real estate or other assets. 

Trusts can help you avoid probate and give you more authority over how your assets are dispersed during your lifetime and after your passing. 

Additionally, setting up a trust helps you avoid extra taxes or charges as your assets are distributed to different beneficiaries.

Creating a Power of Attorney

When you cannot manage your finances, such as paying your bills and managing your money, a power of attorney allows someone else to do so on your behalf. 

If you cannot make decisions for yourself, these documents allow you to control what happens to you and your affairs throughout your life.

When to Change Your Estate Plan

Man looking at will

Experts advise reviewing your estate plan every 3 to 5 years or anytime there is a significant change in your life. 

The following life events typically indicate that your estate plan needs to be updated.

The Arrival of Children

To ensure that your children have a legal guardian in place and will have financial security after your passing, they must be accurately represented in your will (or trust). 

Additionally, updating your documentation is crucial whenever new family members (often grandkids) are born who you want to identify as beneficiaries.

Marriage & Remarriage

Marriage frequently results in shared property ownership between husband and wife and can occasionally result in the drafting of joint trusts or joint wills. 

You must amend your documentation when assets are no longer shared with a previous spouse.

Before Traveling

It is advised to update your estate plan before significant travel, especially if you frequently leave the country or travel extensively.

If anything were to happen to you while traveling abroad, you’d want to have your affairs in order. 

After Inheriting Money or Other Assets

If applicable, update your will (and any trusts) if you unexpectedly acquire new property or funds that raise your estate's value to ensure everything is covered.

Probate Concerns

Having an estate plan will help you cut down on the probate process' delays, costs, and privacy invasions. The following issues with probate include:

  • Privacy loss: The probate court is open to the public. For instance, family members and creditors might obtain your probate papers to contest your will.

  • Cost: Probate costs can be expensive, even in the simplest scenarios. Up to 5% of the assets of an estate may be required to cover legal fees and court costs.

  • Delays: An uncontested probate, on average, could take more than one year. These hold-ups, expenses, and invasions of privacy can frequently be avoided with careful planning.

Preparing for Incapacity 

Estate planning is sometimes viewed as a process that must be completed to prepare for what will occur after your death. However, documentation in the event of your incapacity is a crucial element of estate planning.

If you cannot handle your financial affairs on your own, you can designate someone with the use of a financial power of attorney. This can go into action immediately after you sign it, or it can "spring," which means it takes effect after you become incapable. 

Be sure to inquire about any policies or restrictions your financial services provider may have about the acceptance of springing powers of attorney.

A living will, HIPAA authorization (a detailed document that ensures the privacy of your medical records), and power of attorney for health care (sometimes referred to as a "health care proxy") are all documents that allow someone to make medical decisions on your behalf. 

Consider hiring an attorney to draft these documents if you don't already have them. If the first person you designate cannot serve, you may want to name a backup. 

If you already have these documents, review them to make sure the person(s) identified on them still sits well with you, and work with your lawyer to ensure they are up to date and correctly reflect your wishes.

Charitable Goals

Married couple signing will

There are many ways to include charitable goals in an estate plan if the estate has significant assets and the owner wants to donate to charity. 

Even though charities can be listed as beneficiaries, it may be more advantageous from a tax standpoint to leave the charity non-Roth IRA assets and assets that pass through your will to specific people.

From a tax viewpoint, designating your preferred trust or charity as a primary or contingent beneficiary may be more advantageous. You may designate a particular portion of your retirement plan assets to go to charity, for instance. 

Or, if you want to create a lifetime income stream for a charity, consider creating a charitable lead trust (CLT). If the CLT were correctly constructed, the balance would be distributed to the grantor's beneficiaries after termination.

The beneficiaries of a properly drafted charitable remainder trust (CRT) would receive an income stream. In contrast, the grantor (who founded the trust) is still alive, with the remaining assets going to the grantor's preferred charity. 

Both CLT and CRT have several advantages, some of which include the following:

  1. Lowering or eliminating capital gains taxes on appreciated assets

  2. Claiming charitable contributions as income tax deductions

  3. Lowering the estate tax

  4. Donating to your preferred cause

You can sort through the possibilities that might be ideal for you with an attorney or tax expert.

Business Succession

Have you thought about how to plan for your business after your passing? 

If you intend to retain it inside the family, think about setting up a structure that will make it simpler for family members to inherit the company's assets, like a family limited partnership or a family limited liability corporation.

There are a lot of choices. Your lawyer or tax expert can assist you in making the best choice for you, given your circumstances.

Families with Special Needs

Concerning disabilities, particular trusts are established for a beneficiary who is disabled, organized in a way that permits the beneficiary to continue to be eligible for government benefits like Social Security Disability Insurance

Once more, a lawyer can assist in creating a trust that will suit your unique circumstances.

Start Estate Planning as Soon as Possible

Many professionals advise making an estate plan as soon as you reach legal adulthood and updating it periodically (or whenever you encounter major life changes).

An overview of estate planning by age is provided here:

In Your 20’s and 30’s

In their 20s and 30s, nobody wants to think about dying, but you should prepare for the unexpected. 

Even though it seems implausible, it's a good idea to put your affairs in order in case the unthinkable happens. 

Since your estate plan will probably be relatively straightforward, there's no need to spend a lot of money on it now. This strategy can be updated as your affairs become more intricate.

During this time, think about drafting the following documents as part of your estate plan (they are necessary regardless of your wealth or assets):

  • Healthcare power of attorney: Having a Healthcare POA in place assures that someone you trust will have the legal ability to make these decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated and unable to make them for yourself.

  • Durable power of attorney: A durable power of attorney will give someone you trust the legal power to handle your personal affairs, make payments on your behalf, and speak on your behalf if you become incapacitated.

  • Will: If you have kids, you should have a will since it enables you to designate a guardian for your minor kids. A will also allows you to give your property to unmarried partners who would not otherwise be eligible for an inheritance. 

  • Living will: If you become mentally incompetent, a living will enables you to specify your intentions for your medical care. This is different from a healthcare POA, which gives someone else the authority to make decisions for you. If you are diagnosed with a fatal illness or become incompetent, a living will comes into play to ensure your wishes are honored.

In Your 40’s

The same documents are equally crucial when you approach your 40s. Your circumstances may now be more complicated, and your desires may have altered. 

For instance, you might want to update your power of attorney or modify who your children's legal guardian is. You should update this paperwork in your 40s.

Additionally, consider creating a trust if you amass more assets. Using a trust, you can exert more influence over how your assets are distributed. 

A trust can enable you to include conditions like the requirement that your children use their inheritance money for educational costs or the ability to decide when they receive it. 

Additionally, creating a trust will help you avoid probate.

In Your 50’s and 60’s

By the time you reach 50 or 60, you won't be overly concerned if you start estate planning in your 20s. Considering your present health conditions and age, reviewing some of your estate planning documents that pertain to your healthcare may be wise.

It's a good idea to review your living will and any existing powers of attorney to ensure they still accurately reflect your objectives.

It's never too late to start estate planning if you didn't do so while you were in your 20s. If you haven't already, getting the aforementioned papers organized at this time in your life is more crucial than ever.

Related: Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Share Your Wishes and Estate Plan through Trustworthy

Trustworthy dashboard

One of the most crucial steps you can take to safeguard yourself, your family, and your future is estate planning. 

Trustworthy makes it easy to share your will or update your final intentions. 

It's a good idea to share your estate planning documents as soon as one of the milestones listed above approaches.

Trustworthy gives you and your family a streamlined place to review and revisit your estate planning documents when your situation changes for better or for worse. 

It's best to prepare for the unexpected and ensure your estate plan is in the right hands as soon as possible.

Try a 14-day free trial with Trustworthy today. 

Other Estate Planning Resources

Estate Planning

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

Too many individuals believe that wills and estate plans are only for those who have more wealth or heirs, run their own businesses, or take holidays in second homes.

However, as a lawyer, my advice is that the best time to start an estate plan, regardless of your net worth and assets, is now.  

There is no set age when you should start considering estate planning.  If you pass away without a plan in place, the government will decide who gets your belongings after a protracted and costly probate process. 

A simple will can ease future tension for your family members and offer them confidence that they are carrying out your instructions.

In this guide, I will cover all the information you need to know about when to begin estate planning, including:

  • When is an estate plan required?

  • What happens to my assets when I’m gone?

  • When should I name a guardian?

  • When should I change my estate plan?

When Is an Estate Plan Required?

Many financial consultants advise that an estate plan is required as soon as you reach legal adulthood and to update it every 3 to 5 years afterward.

This is because you are now legally responsible for your money, healthcare (in some areas), and power of attorney at 18. You want to ensure that everything is in order regularly.

What Exactly Is an Estate Plan?

Estate planning entails the creation of several documents that will not only have a significant impact on you while you are alive but also on what happens after your death. 

Most people know that a will, which specifies how your possessions and assets are distributed after your death, is a component of an estate plan. 

A will also allows you to choose the executor who will take care of your business after your passing and name a guardian for your minor children.

Other legal documents that you might require at any time, without warning, are included in an estate plan. An advance directive, also called a living will, outlines your preferences for medical care, including life support and feeding tubes, should you become incapacitated. 

What Happens to My Assets When I’m Gone?

The departed person's estate must pay all unpaid obligations. Assets belong to the estate of the deceased when they die.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

Your state's intestacy law decides who gets your possessions if you don't make a will. 

Your entire estate normally goes to the state if no relatives can be located. This applies to IRAs, retirement funds, and bank accounts.

Probate is the process of settling all of your debts after you pass away and distributing any remaining assets from your estate to your heirs.

When to Name a Guardian

It is always a good idea to start considering who you would name as your first child's guardian if something unexpected happened to you. 

Although most new parents prefer not to think about this, it is important to put it in writing. 

Usually, when you write a will, you designate a guardian. 

It's critical to keep in mind that every time you have a new baby, this paperwork needs to be updated. 

Trustworthy can help you with this process. You can access, share, and modify your documents by simply signing into your account.

When to Draft a Will

Last will and testament

As soon as you attain legal adulthood is the optimal time to prepare a will.

Unfortunately, many people in America die without leaving a will. 

Family members are left dealing with death while also being in charge of many choices they might not have thought about. 

Drafting a will can help you avoid this scenario by allowing you to designate a healthcare proxy, set a power of attorney, and determine how your investments and finances will be allocated.

When to Make a Trust

It might be appropriate to form your trust if you have important assets, such as real estate or other assets. 

Trusts can help you avoid probate and give you more authority over how your assets are dispersed during your lifetime and after your passing. 

Additionally, setting up a trust helps you avoid extra taxes or charges as your assets are distributed to different beneficiaries.

Creating a Power of Attorney

When you cannot manage your finances, such as paying your bills and managing your money, a power of attorney allows someone else to do so on your behalf. 

If you cannot make decisions for yourself, these documents allow you to control what happens to you and your affairs throughout your life.

When to Change Your Estate Plan

Man looking at will

Experts advise reviewing your estate plan every 3 to 5 years or anytime there is a significant change in your life. 

The following life events typically indicate that your estate plan needs to be updated.

The Arrival of Children

To ensure that your children have a legal guardian in place and will have financial security after your passing, they must be accurately represented in your will (or trust). 

Additionally, updating your documentation is crucial whenever new family members (often grandkids) are born who you want to identify as beneficiaries.

Marriage & Remarriage

Marriage frequently results in shared property ownership between husband and wife and can occasionally result in the drafting of joint trusts or joint wills. 

You must amend your documentation when assets are no longer shared with a previous spouse.

Before Traveling

It is advised to update your estate plan before significant travel, especially if you frequently leave the country or travel extensively.

If anything were to happen to you while traveling abroad, you’d want to have your affairs in order. 

After Inheriting Money or Other Assets

If applicable, update your will (and any trusts) if you unexpectedly acquire new property or funds that raise your estate's value to ensure everything is covered.

Probate Concerns

Having an estate plan will help you cut down on the probate process' delays, costs, and privacy invasions. The following issues with probate include:

  • Privacy loss: The probate court is open to the public. For instance, family members and creditors might obtain your probate papers to contest your will.

  • Cost: Probate costs can be expensive, even in the simplest scenarios. Up to 5% of the assets of an estate may be required to cover legal fees and court costs.

  • Delays: An uncontested probate, on average, could take more than one year. These hold-ups, expenses, and invasions of privacy can frequently be avoided with careful planning.

Preparing for Incapacity 

Estate planning is sometimes viewed as a process that must be completed to prepare for what will occur after your death. However, documentation in the event of your incapacity is a crucial element of estate planning.

If you cannot handle your financial affairs on your own, you can designate someone with the use of a financial power of attorney. This can go into action immediately after you sign it, or it can "spring," which means it takes effect after you become incapable. 

Be sure to inquire about any policies or restrictions your financial services provider may have about the acceptance of springing powers of attorney.

A living will, HIPAA authorization (a detailed document that ensures the privacy of your medical records), and power of attorney for health care (sometimes referred to as a "health care proxy") are all documents that allow someone to make medical decisions on your behalf. 

Consider hiring an attorney to draft these documents if you don't already have them. If the first person you designate cannot serve, you may want to name a backup. 

If you already have these documents, review them to make sure the person(s) identified on them still sits well with you, and work with your lawyer to ensure they are up to date and correctly reflect your wishes.

Charitable Goals

Married couple signing will

There are many ways to include charitable goals in an estate plan if the estate has significant assets and the owner wants to donate to charity. 

Even though charities can be listed as beneficiaries, it may be more advantageous from a tax standpoint to leave the charity non-Roth IRA assets and assets that pass through your will to specific people.

From a tax viewpoint, designating your preferred trust or charity as a primary or contingent beneficiary may be more advantageous. You may designate a particular portion of your retirement plan assets to go to charity, for instance. 

Or, if you want to create a lifetime income stream for a charity, consider creating a charitable lead trust (CLT). If the CLT were correctly constructed, the balance would be distributed to the grantor's beneficiaries after termination.

The beneficiaries of a properly drafted charitable remainder trust (CRT) would receive an income stream. In contrast, the grantor (who founded the trust) is still alive, with the remaining assets going to the grantor's preferred charity. 

Both CLT and CRT have several advantages, some of which include the following:

  1. Lowering or eliminating capital gains taxes on appreciated assets

  2. Claiming charitable contributions as income tax deductions

  3. Lowering the estate tax

  4. Donating to your preferred cause

You can sort through the possibilities that might be ideal for you with an attorney or tax expert.

Business Succession

Have you thought about how to plan for your business after your passing? 

If you intend to retain it inside the family, think about setting up a structure that will make it simpler for family members to inherit the company's assets, like a family limited partnership or a family limited liability corporation.

There are a lot of choices. Your lawyer or tax expert can assist you in making the best choice for you, given your circumstances.

Families with Special Needs

Concerning disabilities, particular trusts are established for a beneficiary who is disabled, organized in a way that permits the beneficiary to continue to be eligible for government benefits like Social Security Disability Insurance

Once more, a lawyer can assist in creating a trust that will suit your unique circumstances.

Start Estate Planning as Soon as Possible

Many professionals advise making an estate plan as soon as you reach legal adulthood and updating it periodically (or whenever you encounter major life changes).

An overview of estate planning by age is provided here:

In Your 20’s and 30’s

In their 20s and 30s, nobody wants to think about dying, but you should prepare for the unexpected. 

Even though it seems implausible, it's a good idea to put your affairs in order in case the unthinkable happens. 

Since your estate plan will probably be relatively straightforward, there's no need to spend a lot of money on it now. This strategy can be updated as your affairs become more intricate.

During this time, think about drafting the following documents as part of your estate plan (they are necessary regardless of your wealth or assets):

  • Healthcare power of attorney: Having a Healthcare POA in place assures that someone you trust will have the legal ability to make these decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated and unable to make them for yourself.

  • Durable power of attorney: A durable power of attorney will give someone you trust the legal power to handle your personal affairs, make payments on your behalf, and speak on your behalf if you become incapacitated.

  • Will: If you have kids, you should have a will since it enables you to designate a guardian for your minor kids. A will also allows you to give your property to unmarried partners who would not otherwise be eligible for an inheritance. 

  • Living will: If you become mentally incompetent, a living will enables you to specify your intentions for your medical care. This is different from a healthcare POA, which gives someone else the authority to make decisions for you. If you are diagnosed with a fatal illness or become incompetent, a living will comes into play to ensure your wishes are honored.

In Your 40’s

The same documents are equally crucial when you approach your 40s. Your circumstances may now be more complicated, and your desires may have altered. 

For instance, you might want to update your power of attorney or modify who your children's legal guardian is. You should update this paperwork in your 40s.

Additionally, consider creating a trust if you amass more assets. Using a trust, you can exert more influence over how your assets are distributed. 

A trust can enable you to include conditions like the requirement that your children use their inheritance money for educational costs or the ability to decide when they receive it. 

Additionally, creating a trust will help you avoid probate.

In Your 50’s and 60’s

By the time you reach 50 or 60, you won't be overly concerned if you start estate planning in your 20s. Considering your present health conditions and age, reviewing some of your estate planning documents that pertain to your healthcare may be wise.

It's a good idea to review your living will and any existing powers of attorney to ensure they still accurately reflect your objectives.

It's never too late to start estate planning if you didn't do so while you were in your 20s. If you haven't already, getting the aforementioned papers organized at this time in your life is more crucial than ever.

Related: Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Share Your Wishes and Estate Plan through Trustworthy

Trustworthy dashboard

One of the most crucial steps you can take to safeguard yourself, your family, and your future is estate planning. 

Trustworthy makes it easy to share your will or update your final intentions. 

It's a good idea to share your estate planning documents as soon as one of the milestones listed above approaches.

Trustworthy gives you and your family a streamlined place to review and revisit your estate planning documents when your situation changes for better or for worse. 

It's best to prepare for the unexpected and ensure your estate plan is in the right hands as soon as possible.

Try a 14-day free trial with Trustworthy today. 

Other Estate Planning Resources

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Related Articles

funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline

Feb 20, 2024

Funeral Planning Timeline: How Long Does it Really Take?

writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband

Feb 15, 2024

Writing a Heartfelt Obituary for Your Husband: Inspiring Examples

planning your funeral
planning your funeral
planning your funeral

Feb 14, 2024

Planning Your Funeral: The Best Age To Start

crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son

Feb 14, 2024

Crafting a Loving Obituary For Your Son: Meaningful Examples

improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors

Jan 18, 2024

Improving Communication Between Caregivers and Doctors

copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate

Nov 29, 2023

Can Anyone Get a Copy of a Death Certificate? Who Is Authorized?

original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy

Nov 25, 2023

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy

Nov 25, 2023

How Do You Handle Negative Aspects of the Deceased's Life in a Eulogy?

more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral

Nov 25, 2023

Can There Be More Then One Eulogy at a Funeral? Etiquette Explained

parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension

Nov 24, 2023

My Dad Died, Can I Get His Retirement Pension?

death certificate copies
death certificate copies
death certificate copies

Nov 24, 2023

How Many Copies of a Death Certificate Should You Get?

can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny

Nov 24, 2023

Can a Eulogy Be Funny? Yes, Here Are 10 Respectful but Funny Examples

receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues

Nov 24, 2023

How Do You Receive Inheritance Money WITHOUT any issues?

tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person

Nov 17, 2023

Who Gets The Tax Refund of A Deceased Person? An Accountant Answers

how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy

Nov 17, 2023

How To Start a Eulogy: 15 Heartfelt Examples

son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously

Nov 14, 2023

How To Discuss End-of-Life Care With Parents (Simple Guide)

how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions

Nov 14, 2023

How To Cancel a Deceased Person's Subscriptions the EASY Way

what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy

Nov 8, 2023

What Should You Not Put in a Eulogy (9 Things To Avoid)

how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will

Nov 7, 2023

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template

Nov 6, 2023

Does Microsoft Word Have an Obituary Template?

how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook

Nov 6, 2023

How To Post an Obituary on Facebook: A Step-by-Step Guide

death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process

Nov 6, 2023

Why Do You Need A Death Certificate For Estate & Probate Process?

correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate

Nov 2, 2023

How Do I Correct Errors on a Death Certificate? And, How Long Does It Take?

steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps For Writing a Eulogy For Mom

steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps for Writing a Eulogy for Dad

who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies

Nov 1, 2023

Who Does The Obituary When Someone Dies?

Nov 1, 2023

How Late Is Too Late For An Obituary? 6 Steps To Take Today

how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost

Nov 1, 2023

How Much Does It Cost To Publish An Obituary? Breaking It Down

reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary

Nov 1, 2023

6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary

Oct 30, 2023

Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

Oct 30, 2023

Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

Oct 5, 2023

Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

Sep 14, 2023

I'm Trapped Caring for Elderly Parents

401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors

Oct 5, 2023

401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k

Sep 12, 2023

How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

grandparents
grandparents
grandparents

Aug 3, 2023

The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

Aug 3, 2023

The Essential Guide to Preparing for Retirement

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

Jul 14, 2023

Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

Jun 7, 2023

How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

Jun 6, 2023

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

Jun 6, 2023

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

Jun 6, 2023

How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

Jun 6, 2023

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

May 17, 2023

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

May 2, 2023

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

May 1, 2023

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document

Apr 15, 2023

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

Apr 15, 2023

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

Apr 15, 2023

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

Apr 15, 2023

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Apr 15, 2023

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Apr 15, 2023

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

Apr 15, 2023

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

White house
White house
White house

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Better To Sell or Rent An Inherited House? (Pros & Cons)

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

Apr 15, 2023

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them

Apr 15, 2023

What To Bring To Estate Planning Meeting (Checklist)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Apr 15, 2023

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Apr 15, 2023

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand

Apr 15, 2023

Can The Executor Of A Will Access Bank Accounts? (Yes, Here's How)

Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

Complete List of Things To Do For Elderly Parents (Checklist)

Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For A Deceased Person?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Help Elderly Parents From A Distance? 7 Tips

Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents

Apr 15, 2023

Legal Documents For Elderly Parents: Checklist

House
House
House

Apr 15, 2023

Selling Elderly Parents Home: How To Do It + Mistakes To Avoid

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache

Apr 15, 2023

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork

Apr 6, 2023

Can An Out of State Attorney Write My Will? (A Lawyer Answers)

People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills

Mar 15, 2023

Settling an Estate: A Step-by-Step Guide

Check on the table
Check on the table
Check on the table

Feb 10, 2023

My Deceased Husband Received A Check In The Mail (4 Steps To Take)

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

Feb 7, 2023

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Feb 6, 2023

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Collect Your Parents' Social Security When They Die?

Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book

Feb 1, 2023

How Do I Stop VA Benefits When Someone Dies (Simple Guide)

Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Pay Money Into A Deceased Person's Bank Account?

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Feb 1, 2023

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.

Feb 1, 2023

Does The DMV Know When Someone Dies?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Feb 1, 2023

How To Find A Deceased Person's Lawyer (5 Ways)

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Feb 1, 2023

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form

Feb 1, 2023

How to Stop Social Security Direct Deposit After Death

Firearm
Firearm
Firearm

Feb 1, 2023

How To Transfer Firearms From A Deceased Person (3 Steps)

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Feb 1, 2023

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road

Feb 1, 2023

What Happens To A Leased Vehicle When Someone Dies?

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Jan 31, 2023

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop

Jan 31, 2023

How To Get Into a Deceased Person's Computer (Microsoft & Apple)

Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation

Jan 31, 2023

Why Do Funeral Homes Take Fingerprints of the Deceased?

Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home

Jan 31, 2023

What To Do If Your Deceased Parents' Home Is In Foreclosure

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Jan 31, 2023

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer

Jan 31, 2023

What Happens If a Deceased Individual Owes Taxes?

Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional

Jan 31, 2023

Components of Estate Planning: 6 Things To Consider

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Jan 22, 2023

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives

Jan 8, 2023

What Does a Typical Estate Plan Include?

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Apr 15, 2022

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2022

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom

Mar 2, 2022

What Does Your “Property” Mean?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is the Uniform Trust Code? What is the Uniform Probate Code?

Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales

Mar 2, 2022

Do You Need to Avoid Probate?

Person signing document
Person signing document
Person signing document

Mar 2, 2022

How is a Trust Created?

stethoscope
stethoscope
stethoscope

Mar 2, 2022

What Are Advance Directives?

Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach

Mar 2, 2022

What does a Trustee Do?

Large house exterior
Large house exterior
Large house exterior

Mar 2, 2022

What is an Estate Plan? (And why you need one)

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is Probate?

United States Map
United States Map
United States Map

Mar 2, 2022

What Is Your Domicile & Why It Matters

Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork

Mar 2, 2022

What Is a Power of Attorney for Finances?

A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed

Mar 1, 2022

Should your family consider an umbrella insurance policy?

Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks

Mar 1, 2022

Do I need a digital power of attorney?

Person signing documents
Person signing documents
Person signing documents

Apr 6, 2020

What Exactly is a Trust?