Estate Planning

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

A pressing concern for many families is protecting elderly parents from potential exploitation by siblings. 

Unfortunately, emotional, physical, or financial abuse is more common than you might expect. Money matters can stir up mixed motives and suspicions even in the most loving families. 

However, families can navigate these challenges with the right approach. 

In this article, we will discuss how to protect your parents while maintaining healthy sibling relationships, as well as common issues among family members and offer solutions.

Key Takeaways:

  • Elder abuse affects millions of older adults worldwide, with neglect being the most common form of elder abuse. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience elder abuse.

  • Signs of elder neglect include unintentional weight loss, dehydration, poor hygiene, unclean living conditions, dirty clothes or unkempt hair, and loss of interest in activities or hobbies.

  • Protecting elderly parents from financial abuse involves being wary of sudden changes to estate plans, documenting everything, calling Adult Protective Services, and invoking Power of Attorney.

How Common is Elder Abuse and Neglect Among the Aging Population?

As the elderly population continues to grow, adult children are increasingly taking on responsibilities such as making financial or medical decisions for their aging parents. 

However, this can sometimes result in the children exerting undue influence over the parent's life, leading to elder abuse. 

Elder abuse is a widespread global public health and human rights issue, with up to five million older Americans abused annually, and only a small fraction of cases are reported to the authorities. 

Neglect is the most common form of elder abuse, defined as the failure to meet an older adult's basic needs, such as food, water, shelter, clothing, hygiene, and essential medical care. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience some form of elder abuse.

What Are the Signs of Neglect in Senior Parents?

Elderly woman in a chair

You should still keep an eye out for signs of elder neglect in senior parents, even if there are no visible signs of physical abuse by a sibling or caretaker. 

Here are some red flags to watch out for:

  • Unintentional weight loss due to lack of food

  • Regular symptoms of dehydration due to lack of water

  • Poor hygiene leading to bad breath and/or body odor

  • Missing crucial medical aids such as medication, dentures, a hearing aid, or a walker

  • Living conditions that are unclean or in disrepair

  • Wearing dirty clothes or having unkempt hair

  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies they usually enjoy

How to Protect Elderly Parents from Financial Abuse When a Sibling is Stealing

Financial elder abuse can be just as damaging as physical or emotional abuse. Unfortunately, older people may not realize they are being financially abused, making it even more important for family members to be vigilant and proactive. 

Here's what you can do to protect your elderly parents from financial abuse when a sibling is stealing: 

Know the Signs

Be vigilant and observant, looking for signs such as missed bill payments, sudden changes to estate plans, unexplained bank changes, and unusual withdrawals or check signatures.

If your parent usually pays their bills on time but suddenly starts missing payments, this could be a sign that their money is being mishandled.

If your sibling has access to your parent's bank account or credit cards, they could be using their funds for their own personal expenses, neglecting to pay your parent's bills on time. They may also be stealing money from your parent's accounts, leaving them with insufficient funds to pay their bills.

Missed bill payments can result in late fees, negative marks on credit reports, and service interruptions. You may need to start monitoring your parents' financial accounts more closely, setting up automatic bill payments, or seeking legal advice if financial abuse is suspected.

Be Wary of Sudden Changes to Estate Plans

If your parent has had a long-standing estate plan but suddenly changes it without a clear explanation, this could be a red flag. 

A sudden change in their will or trust could be a sign that someone is exerting undue influence over their decisions regarding the distribution of their assets after they pass away. 

Undue influence happens when someone uses their position of power or trust to manipulate and influence another person's decisions, particularly those related to finances or estate planning

If your parent is experiencing cognitive decline or is physically dependent on your sibling, they may try to influence your parent's estate planning decisions for their own benefit.

If your parent has suddenly changed their estate plan without a clear explanation, investigate the circumstances surrounding the change. 

Ask them why they made the change and if they were influenced by anyone else. You may also want to speak with an attorney who specializes in elder law to review the new estate plan and ensure that your parent's wishes are being honored.

Document Everything

Keep detailed records of all financial transactions and suspicious activity.

Detailed records can serve as evidence in the event of financial abuse or fraud. If you suspect that your sibling is mishandling your parent's funds, detailed records can help you to build a case and provide evidence to support your claims.

Call Adult Protective Services

Adult Protective Services (APS) is a government agency responsible for investigating reports of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable and elderly adults. 

If you suspect that your elderly parent is being financially abused by a sibling, contacting APS is an important step to take.

You can contact APS by calling the agency's hotline or making a report online. The hotline is typically available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can find the hotline number for your state by searching online or calling your local Area Agency on Aging.

When you contact APS, they will send a caseworker to your parent's home to investigate the situation. The caseworker will talk to your parent, other family members, and any caregivers involved in your parent's care to gather information.

If the investigation reveals that your sibling is responsible for the financial abuse, APS can take legal action against them to protect your parent's interests. Depending on the severity of the abuse, your sibling may face criminal charges and may be required to pay restitution.

Invoke Power of Attorney

If you are the legal power of attorney for your elderly parent, you have the authority to make decisions on their behalf regarding financial and legal matters. This authority can be granted through a legal document called a power of attorney (POA). 

To invoke a POA, you'll need a copy of the legal document granting you such authority. You may need to provide this document to banks or other financial institutions to gain access to your parent's accounts. Once you have access, you can review financial statements and transactions to look for any suspicious activity.

By invoking your POA, you can monitor financial transactions, freeze accounts if necessary, and take legal action against your sibling if you find evidence of financial abuse.

Keep in mind that a POA only grants you the authority to act on your parent's behalf while they are alive and mentally competent. If your parent becomes incapacitated, the POA may no longer be valid. In that case, you may need to seek guardianship or conservatorship to continue managing their affairs.

How to Take Action When Siblings Block Access to Elderly Parents

Person signing paperwork

It can be concerning when a sibling prevents access to an elderly parent, leaving you and your family members unsure of what is happening to their loved one. 

Siblings can often use discreet methods, such as answering the phone for parents or making excuses to avoid visits, making it challenging to know what is going on. 

This can indicate some form of elder abuse, with the sibling wanting to control the situation and keep others in the dark.

Call the Police

If you suspect elder abuse, the first step is to call the police and explain the situation. The police can perform a wellness check on your elderly parent and intervene if they suspect abuse. 

During a wellness check, the police will visit your parent's home and assess their well-being, looking for signs of physical or emotional abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. They may also interview your parent, as well as any caregivers or family members who are present.

If the police suspect that your parent is being abused or neglected, they may intervene and protect your parent by removing your parent from their current living situation, contacting social services, or even arresting the suspected abuser.

Take Legal Action

If the police cannot help, legal action may be necessary, and you can file for guardianship of your parent. Once you become the guardian, your sibling will no longer be able to continue their abuse. 

To do this, you'll need an attorney experienced in guardianship cases. They can guide you through the process and help you complete the necessary paperwork.

To file for guardianship, you need to submit a petition to the court outlining your concerns and explaining why you believe guardianship is necessary. You will also need evidence to support your case, such as medical records, witness statements, or police reports.

After you file a petition, the court will schedule a hearing to review your case. At the hearing, you and your attorney will present evidence and arguments in support of guardianship. Your sibling will have the opportunity to respond and provide their own evidence and arguments.

If the court finds that guardianship is necessary, it will issue a guardianship order. This order will give you legal authority to make decisions on behalf of your elderly parent and protect them from abuse or neglect.

How Can Trustworthy Protect Your Parents' Important Documents?

Family ID category in Trustworthy

If you are looking for an online platform to securely store and manage documents for your elderly parents, you've come to the right place. Trustworthy's online document management and cloud storage platform can help keep your parents' documents safe and organized, making accessing and managing their important paperwork easier. 

Here's how Trustworthy can help:

  1. Secure Storage: Trustworthy provides encryption and other security measures to ensure your parents' files are stored securely. This can protect sensitive information from unauthorized sibling access or cyber threats.

  2. Access Control: Trustworthy allows you to control who has access to your parents' documents. You can set permissions to ensure that only trusted people can view or edit the documents, reducing the risk of unauthorized access or misuse by siblings.

  3. Organization and Searchability: Trustworthy can help keep your parents' documents organized and easily searchable. This can be particularly helpful if you need to access your parents' important documents quickly, such as medical records, legal documents, or financial statements.

  4. Backup and Recovery: Trustworthy's online storage provides an additional layer of protection against data loss. In the event of physical damage or theft, storing digital copies of your parents' documents online can ensure you can still access them.

  5. Remote Access: With Trustworthy's online document storage, you can access your parents' documents from anywhere, anytime. This can be particularly helpful if you need to review documents while away from your parents' home or while meeting with legal or financial professionals.


    Sign up for your free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Estate Planning

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

A pressing concern for many families is protecting elderly parents from potential exploitation by siblings. 

Unfortunately, emotional, physical, or financial abuse is more common than you might expect. Money matters can stir up mixed motives and suspicions even in the most loving families. 

However, families can navigate these challenges with the right approach. 

In this article, we will discuss how to protect your parents while maintaining healthy sibling relationships, as well as common issues among family members and offer solutions.

Key Takeaways:

  • Elder abuse affects millions of older adults worldwide, with neglect being the most common form of elder abuse. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience elder abuse.

  • Signs of elder neglect include unintentional weight loss, dehydration, poor hygiene, unclean living conditions, dirty clothes or unkempt hair, and loss of interest in activities or hobbies.

  • Protecting elderly parents from financial abuse involves being wary of sudden changes to estate plans, documenting everything, calling Adult Protective Services, and invoking Power of Attorney.

How Common is Elder Abuse and Neglect Among the Aging Population?

As the elderly population continues to grow, adult children are increasingly taking on responsibilities such as making financial or medical decisions for their aging parents. 

However, this can sometimes result in the children exerting undue influence over the parent's life, leading to elder abuse. 

Elder abuse is a widespread global public health and human rights issue, with up to five million older Americans abused annually, and only a small fraction of cases are reported to the authorities. 

Neglect is the most common form of elder abuse, defined as the failure to meet an older adult's basic needs, such as food, water, shelter, clothing, hygiene, and essential medical care. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience some form of elder abuse.

What Are the Signs of Neglect in Senior Parents?

Elderly woman in a chair

You should still keep an eye out for signs of elder neglect in senior parents, even if there are no visible signs of physical abuse by a sibling or caretaker. 

Here are some red flags to watch out for:

  • Unintentional weight loss due to lack of food

  • Regular symptoms of dehydration due to lack of water

  • Poor hygiene leading to bad breath and/or body odor

  • Missing crucial medical aids such as medication, dentures, a hearing aid, or a walker

  • Living conditions that are unclean or in disrepair

  • Wearing dirty clothes or having unkempt hair

  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies they usually enjoy

How to Protect Elderly Parents from Financial Abuse When a Sibling is Stealing

Financial elder abuse can be just as damaging as physical or emotional abuse. Unfortunately, older people may not realize they are being financially abused, making it even more important for family members to be vigilant and proactive. 

Here's what you can do to protect your elderly parents from financial abuse when a sibling is stealing: 

Know the Signs

Be vigilant and observant, looking for signs such as missed bill payments, sudden changes to estate plans, unexplained bank changes, and unusual withdrawals or check signatures.

If your parent usually pays their bills on time but suddenly starts missing payments, this could be a sign that their money is being mishandled.

If your sibling has access to your parent's bank account or credit cards, they could be using their funds for their own personal expenses, neglecting to pay your parent's bills on time. They may also be stealing money from your parent's accounts, leaving them with insufficient funds to pay their bills.

Missed bill payments can result in late fees, negative marks on credit reports, and service interruptions. You may need to start monitoring your parents' financial accounts more closely, setting up automatic bill payments, or seeking legal advice if financial abuse is suspected.

Be Wary of Sudden Changes to Estate Plans

If your parent has had a long-standing estate plan but suddenly changes it without a clear explanation, this could be a red flag. 

A sudden change in their will or trust could be a sign that someone is exerting undue influence over their decisions regarding the distribution of their assets after they pass away. 

Undue influence happens when someone uses their position of power or trust to manipulate and influence another person's decisions, particularly those related to finances or estate planning

If your parent is experiencing cognitive decline or is physically dependent on your sibling, they may try to influence your parent's estate planning decisions for their own benefit.

If your parent has suddenly changed their estate plan without a clear explanation, investigate the circumstances surrounding the change. 

Ask them why they made the change and if they were influenced by anyone else. You may also want to speak with an attorney who specializes in elder law to review the new estate plan and ensure that your parent's wishes are being honored.

Document Everything

Keep detailed records of all financial transactions and suspicious activity.

Detailed records can serve as evidence in the event of financial abuse or fraud. If you suspect that your sibling is mishandling your parent's funds, detailed records can help you to build a case and provide evidence to support your claims.

Call Adult Protective Services

Adult Protective Services (APS) is a government agency responsible for investigating reports of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable and elderly adults. 

If you suspect that your elderly parent is being financially abused by a sibling, contacting APS is an important step to take.

You can contact APS by calling the agency's hotline or making a report online. The hotline is typically available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can find the hotline number for your state by searching online or calling your local Area Agency on Aging.

When you contact APS, they will send a caseworker to your parent's home to investigate the situation. The caseworker will talk to your parent, other family members, and any caregivers involved in your parent's care to gather information.

If the investigation reveals that your sibling is responsible for the financial abuse, APS can take legal action against them to protect your parent's interests. Depending on the severity of the abuse, your sibling may face criminal charges and may be required to pay restitution.

Invoke Power of Attorney

If you are the legal power of attorney for your elderly parent, you have the authority to make decisions on their behalf regarding financial and legal matters. This authority can be granted through a legal document called a power of attorney (POA). 

To invoke a POA, you'll need a copy of the legal document granting you such authority. You may need to provide this document to banks or other financial institutions to gain access to your parent's accounts. Once you have access, you can review financial statements and transactions to look for any suspicious activity.

By invoking your POA, you can monitor financial transactions, freeze accounts if necessary, and take legal action against your sibling if you find evidence of financial abuse.

Keep in mind that a POA only grants you the authority to act on your parent's behalf while they are alive and mentally competent. If your parent becomes incapacitated, the POA may no longer be valid. In that case, you may need to seek guardianship or conservatorship to continue managing their affairs.

How to Take Action When Siblings Block Access to Elderly Parents

Person signing paperwork

It can be concerning when a sibling prevents access to an elderly parent, leaving you and your family members unsure of what is happening to their loved one. 

Siblings can often use discreet methods, such as answering the phone for parents or making excuses to avoid visits, making it challenging to know what is going on. 

This can indicate some form of elder abuse, with the sibling wanting to control the situation and keep others in the dark.

Call the Police

If you suspect elder abuse, the first step is to call the police and explain the situation. The police can perform a wellness check on your elderly parent and intervene if they suspect abuse. 

During a wellness check, the police will visit your parent's home and assess their well-being, looking for signs of physical or emotional abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. They may also interview your parent, as well as any caregivers or family members who are present.

If the police suspect that your parent is being abused or neglected, they may intervene and protect your parent by removing your parent from their current living situation, contacting social services, or even arresting the suspected abuser.

Take Legal Action

If the police cannot help, legal action may be necessary, and you can file for guardianship of your parent. Once you become the guardian, your sibling will no longer be able to continue their abuse. 

To do this, you'll need an attorney experienced in guardianship cases. They can guide you through the process and help you complete the necessary paperwork.

To file for guardianship, you need to submit a petition to the court outlining your concerns and explaining why you believe guardianship is necessary. You will also need evidence to support your case, such as medical records, witness statements, or police reports.

After you file a petition, the court will schedule a hearing to review your case. At the hearing, you and your attorney will present evidence and arguments in support of guardianship. Your sibling will have the opportunity to respond and provide their own evidence and arguments.

If the court finds that guardianship is necessary, it will issue a guardianship order. This order will give you legal authority to make decisions on behalf of your elderly parent and protect them from abuse or neglect.

How Can Trustworthy Protect Your Parents' Important Documents?

Family ID category in Trustworthy

If you are looking for an online platform to securely store and manage documents for your elderly parents, you've come to the right place. Trustworthy's online document management and cloud storage platform can help keep your parents' documents safe and organized, making accessing and managing their important paperwork easier. 

Here's how Trustworthy can help:

  1. Secure Storage: Trustworthy provides encryption and other security measures to ensure your parents' files are stored securely. This can protect sensitive information from unauthorized sibling access or cyber threats.

  2. Access Control: Trustworthy allows you to control who has access to your parents' documents. You can set permissions to ensure that only trusted people can view or edit the documents, reducing the risk of unauthorized access or misuse by siblings.

  3. Organization and Searchability: Trustworthy can help keep your parents' documents organized and easily searchable. This can be particularly helpful if you need to access your parents' important documents quickly, such as medical records, legal documents, or financial statements.

  4. Backup and Recovery: Trustworthy's online storage provides an additional layer of protection against data loss. In the event of physical damage or theft, storing digital copies of your parents' documents online can ensure you can still access them.

  5. Remote Access: With Trustworthy's online document storage, you can access your parents' documents from anywhere, anytime. This can be particularly helpful if you need to review documents while away from your parents' home or while meeting with legal or financial professionals.


    Sign up for your free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Estate Planning

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Trustworthy icon

Ty McDuffey

Apr 15, 2023

A pressing concern for many families is protecting elderly parents from potential exploitation by siblings. 

Unfortunately, emotional, physical, or financial abuse is more common than you might expect. Money matters can stir up mixed motives and suspicions even in the most loving families. 

However, families can navigate these challenges with the right approach. 

In this article, we will discuss how to protect your parents while maintaining healthy sibling relationships, as well as common issues among family members and offer solutions.

Key Takeaways:

  • Elder abuse affects millions of older adults worldwide, with neglect being the most common form of elder abuse. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience elder abuse.

  • Signs of elder neglect include unintentional weight loss, dehydration, poor hygiene, unclean living conditions, dirty clothes or unkempt hair, and loss of interest in activities or hobbies.

  • Protecting elderly parents from financial abuse involves being wary of sudden changes to estate plans, documenting everything, calling Adult Protective Services, and invoking Power of Attorney.

How Common is Elder Abuse and Neglect Among the Aging Population?

As the elderly population continues to grow, adult children are increasingly taking on responsibilities such as making financial or medical decisions for their aging parents. 

However, this can sometimes result in the children exerting undue influence over the parent's life, leading to elder abuse. 

Elder abuse is a widespread global public health and human rights issue, with up to five million older Americans abused annually, and only a small fraction of cases are reported to the authorities. 

Neglect is the most common form of elder abuse, defined as the failure to meet an older adult's basic needs, such as food, water, shelter, clothing, hygiene, and essential medical care. About one in 10 elderly people living in their own homes experience some form of elder abuse.

What Are the Signs of Neglect in Senior Parents?

Elderly woman in a chair

You should still keep an eye out for signs of elder neglect in senior parents, even if there are no visible signs of physical abuse by a sibling or caretaker. 

Here are some red flags to watch out for:

  • Unintentional weight loss due to lack of food

  • Regular symptoms of dehydration due to lack of water

  • Poor hygiene leading to bad breath and/or body odor

  • Missing crucial medical aids such as medication, dentures, a hearing aid, or a walker

  • Living conditions that are unclean or in disrepair

  • Wearing dirty clothes or having unkempt hair

  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies they usually enjoy

How to Protect Elderly Parents from Financial Abuse When a Sibling is Stealing

Financial elder abuse can be just as damaging as physical or emotional abuse. Unfortunately, older people may not realize they are being financially abused, making it even more important for family members to be vigilant and proactive. 

Here's what you can do to protect your elderly parents from financial abuse when a sibling is stealing: 

Know the Signs

Be vigilant and observant, looking for signs such as missed bill payments, sudden changes to estate plans, unexplained bank changes, and unusual withdrawals or check signatures.

If your parent usually pays their bills on time but suddenly starts missing payments, this could be a sign that their money is being mishandled.

If your sibling has access to your parent's bank account or credit cards, they could be using their funds for their own personal expenses, neglecting to pay your parent's bills on time. They may also be stealing money from your parent's accounts, leaving them with insufficient funds to pay their bills.

Missed bill payments can result in late fees, negative marks on credit reports, and service interruptions. You may need to start monitoring your parents' financial accounts more closely, setting up automatic bill payments, or seeking legal advice if financial abuse is suspected.

Be Wary of Sudden Changes to Estate Plans

If your parent has had a long-standing estate plan but suddenly changes it without a clear explanation, this could be a red flag. 

A sudden change in their will or trust could be a sign that someone is exerting undue influence over their decisions regarding the distribution of their assets after they pass away. 

Undue influence happens when someone uses their position of power or trust to manipulate and influence another person's decisions, particularly those related to finances or estate planning

If your parent is experiencing cognitive decline or is physically dependent on your sibling, they may try to influence your parent's estate planning decisions for their own benefit.

If your parent has suddenly changed their estate plan without a clear explanation, investigate the circumstances surrounding the change. 

Ask them why they made the change and if they were influenced by anyone else. You may also want to speak with an attorney who specializes in elder law to review the new estate plan and ensure that your parent's wishes are being honored.

Document Everything

Keep detailed records of all financial transactions and suspicious activity.

Detailed records can serve as evidence in the event of financial abuse or fraud. If you suspect that your sibling is mishandling your parent's funds, detailed records can help you to build a case and provide evidence to support your claims.

Call Adult Protective Services

Adult Protective Services (APS) is a government agency responsible for investigating reports of abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable and elderly adults. 

If you suspect that your elderly parent is being financially abused by a sibling, contacting APS is an important step to take.

You can contact APS by calling the agency's hotline or making a report online. The hotline is typically available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can find the hotline number for your state by searching online or calling your local Area Agency on Aging.

When you contact APS, they will send a caseworker to your parent's home to investigate the situation. The caseworker will talk to your parent, other family members, and any caregivers involved in your parent's care to gather information.

If the investigation reveals that your sibling is responsible for the financial abuse, APS can take legal action against them to protect your parent's interests. Depending on the severity of the abuse, your sibling may face criminal charges and may be required to pay restitution.

Invoke Power of Attorney

If you are the legal power of attorney for your elderly parent, you have the authority to make decisions on their behalf regarding financial and legal matters. This authority can be granted through a legal document called a power of attorney (POA). 

To invoke a POA, you'll need a copy of the legal document granting you such authority. You may need to provide this document to banks or other financial institutions to gain access to your parent's accounts. Once you have access, you can review financial statements and transactions to look for any suspicious activity.

By invoking your POA, you can monitor financial transactions, freeze accounts if necessary, and take legal action against your sibling if you find evidence of financial abuse.

Keep in mind that a POA only grants you the authority to act on your parent's behalf while they are alive and mentally competent. If your parent becomes incapacitated, the POA may no longer be valid. In that case, you may need to seek guardianship or conservatorship to continue managing their affairs.

How to Take Action When Siblings Block Access to Elderly Parents

Person signing paperwork

It can be concerning when a sibling prevents access to an elderly parent, leaving you and your family members unsure of what is happening to their loved one. 

Siblings can often use discreet methods, such as answering the phone for parents or making excuses to avoid visits, making it challenging to know what is going on. 

This can indicate some form of elder abuse, with the sibling wanting to control the situation and keep others in the dark.

Call the Police

If you suspect elder abuse, the first step is to call the police and explain the situation. The police can perform a wellness check on your elderly parent and intervene if they suspect abuse. 

During a wellness check, the police will visit your parent's home and assess their well-being, looking for signs of physical or emotional abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation. They may also interview your parent, as well as any caregivers or family members who are present.

If the police suspect that your parent is being abused or neglected, they may intervene and protect your parent by removing your parent from their current living situation, contacting social services, or even arresting the suspected abuser.

Take Legal Action

If the police cannot help, legal action may be necessary, and you can file for guardianship of your parent. Once you become the guardian, your sibling will no longer be able to continue their abuse. 

To do this, you'll need an attorney experienced in guardianship cases. They can guide you through the process and help you complete the necessary paperwork.

To file for guardianship, you need to submit a petition to the court outlining your concerns and explaining why you believe guardianship is necessary. You will also need evidence to support your case, such as medical records, witness statements, or police reports.

After you file a petition, the court will schedule a hearing to review your case. At the hearing, you and your attorney will present evidence and arguments in support of guardianship. Your sibling will have the opportunity to respond and provide their own evidence and arguments.

If the court finds that guardianship is necessary, it will issue a guardianship order. This order will give you legal authority to make decisions on behalf of your elderly parent and protect them from abuse or neglect.

How Can Trustworthy Protect Your Parents' Important Documents?

Family ID category in Trustworthy

If you are looking for an online platform to securely store and manage documents for your elderly parents, you've come to the right place. Trustworthy's online document management and cloud storage platform can help keep your parents' documents safe and organized, making accessing and managing their important paperwork easier. 

Here's how Trustworthy can help:

  1. Secure Storage: Trustworthy provides encryption and other security measures to ensure your parents' files are stored securely. This can protect sensitive information from unauthorized sibling access or cyber threats.

  2. Access Control: Trustworthy allows you to control who has access to your parents' documents. You can set permissions to ensure that only trusted people can view or edit the documents, reducing the risk of unauthorized access or misuse by siblings.

  3. Organization and Searchability: Trustworthy can help keep your parents' documents organized and easily searchable. This can be particularly helpful if you need to access your parents' important documents quickly, such as medical records, legal documents, or financial statements.

  4. Backup and Recovery: Trustworthy's online storage provides an additional layer of protection against data loss. In the event of physical damage or theft, storing digital copies of your parents' documents online can ensure you can still access them.

  5. Remote Access: With Trustworthy's online document storage, you can access your parents' documents from anywhere, anytime. This can be particularly helpful if you need to review documents while away from your parents' home or while meeting with legal or financial professionals.


    Sign up for your free 14-day trial with Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

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Can a Eulogy Be Funny? Yes, Here Are 10 Respectful but Funny Examples

receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues

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tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person

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Who Gets The Tax Refund of A Deceased Person? An Accountant Answers

how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy

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son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously

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How To Discuss End-of-Life Care With Parents (Simple Guide)

how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions

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How To Cancel a Deceased Person's Subscriptions the EASY Way

what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy

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how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will

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How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template

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Does Microsoft Word Have an Obituary Template?

how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook

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How To Post an Obituary on Facebook: A Step-by-Step Guide

death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process

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Why Do You Need A Death Certificate For Estate & Probate Process?

correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate

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How Do I Correct Errors on a Death Certificate? And, How Long Does It Take?

steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom

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12 Steps For Writing a Eulogy For Mom

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steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad

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12 Steps for Writing a Eulogy for Dad

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who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies

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Who Does The Obituary When Someone Dies?

Nov 1, 2023

How Late Is Too Late For An Obituary? 6 Steps To Take Today

how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost

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How Much Does It Cost To Publish An Obituary? Breaking It Down

reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary

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6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

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where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary

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Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

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Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

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Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

Sep 14, 2023

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401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors

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401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k

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How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

grandparents
grandparents
grandparents

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The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

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Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

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Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

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Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

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How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

Jun 6, 2023

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

Jun 6, 2023

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

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How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

Jun 6, 2023

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

May 17, 2023

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

May 2, 2023

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

May 1, 2023

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document

Apr 15, 2023

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

Apr 15, 2023

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

Apr 15, 2023

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

Apr 15, 2023

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Apr 15, 2023

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

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Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Apr 15, 2023

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

Apr 15, 2023

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

White house
White house
White house

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Better To Sell or Rent An Inherited House? (Pros & Cons)

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

Apr 15, 2023

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them

Apr 15, 2023

What To Bring To Estate Planning Meeting (Checklist)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Apr 15, 2023

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

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Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Apr 15, 2023

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand

Apr 15, 2023

Can The Executor Of A Will Access Bank Accounts? (Yes, Here's How)

Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

Complete List of Things To Do For Elderly Parents (Checklist)

Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For A Deceased Person?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Help Elderly Parents From A Distance? 7 Tips

Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents

Apr 15, 2023

Legal Documents For Elderly Parents: Checklist

House
House
House

Apr 15, 2023

Selling Elderly Parents Home: How To Do It + Mistakes To Avoid

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache

Apr 15, 2023

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork

Apr 6, 2023

Can An Out of State Attorney Write My Will? (A Lawyer Answers)

People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills

Mar 15, 2023

Settling an Estate: A Step-by-Step Guide

Check on the table
Check on the table
Check on the table

Feb 10, 2023

My Deceased Husband Received A Check In The Mail (4 Steps To Take)

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

Feb 7, 2023

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Feb 6, 2023

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Collect Your Parents' Social Security When They Die?

Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book

Feb 1, 2023

How Do I Stop VA Benefits When Someone Dies (Simple Guide)

Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Pay Money Into A Deceased Person's Bank Account?

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Feb 1, 2023

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.

Feb 1, 2023

Does The DMV Know When Someone Dies?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Feb 1, 2023

How To Find A Deceased Person's Lawyer (5 Ways)

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Feb 1, 2023

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form

Feb 1, 2023

How to Stop Social Security Direct Deposit After Death

Firearm
Firearm
Firearm

Feb 1, 2023

How To Transfer Firearms From A Deceased Person (3 Steps)

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Feb 1, 2023

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road

Feb 1, 2023

What Happens To A Leased Vehicle When Someone Dies?

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Jan 31, 2023

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop

Jan 31, 2023

How To Get Into a Deceased Person's Computer (Microsoft & Apple)

Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation

Jan 31, 2023

Why Do Funeral Homes Take Fingerprints of the Deceased?

Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home

Jan 31, 2023

What To Do If Your Deceased Parents' Home Is In Foreclosure

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Jan 31, 2023

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer

Jan 31, 2023

What Happens If a Deceased Individual Owes Taxes?

Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional

Jan 31, 2023

Components of Estate Planning: 6 Things To Consider

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Jan 22, 2023

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives

Jan 8, 2023

What Does a Typical Estate Plan Include?

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Apr 15, 2022

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2022

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom

Mar 2, 2022

What Does Your “Property” Mean?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is the Uniform Trust Code? What is the Uniform Probate Code?

Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales

Mar 2, 2022

Do You Need to Avoid Probate?

Person signing document
Person signing document
Person signing document

Mar 2, 2022

How is a Trust Created?

stethoscope
stethoscope
stethoscope

Mar 2, 2022

What Are Advance Directives?

Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach

Mar 2, 2022

What does a Trustee Do?

Large house exterior
Large house exterior
Large house exterior

Mar 2, 2022

What is an Estate Plan? (And why you need one)

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is Probate?

United States Map
United States Map
United States Map

Mar 2, 2022

What Is Your Domicile & Why It Matters

Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork

Mar 2, 2022

What Is a Power of Attorney for Finances?

A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed

Mar 1, 2022

Should your family consider an umbrella insurance policy?

Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks

Mar 1, 2022

Do I need a digital power of attorney?

Person signing documents
Person signing documents
Person signing documents

Apr 6, 2020

What Exactly is a Trust?