Estate Planning

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

how are estates distributed if there's no will

Nash Riggins

Nov 7, 2023

Many Americans neglect estate planning, particularly where setting up a will is concerned. According to one recent Gallup poll, only 46% of adults in the US have a valid will. If you fall into that category, there is a process the state will carry out when you die to distribute your assets, but it isn’t very straightforward.

Read on to find out what happens to your estate when you don’t leave a will. Learn about the intestacy process and how it works, and find out how to avoid probate with proper estate planning.

Key Takeaways

  • When you die without a valid will, your estate is passed on through the intestacy process.

  • The intestacy process is when a probate court assigns a representative to value your estate, settle liabilities, and distribute the remaining assets.

  • You can avoid the probate process by setting up a value will or creating a trust to pass on assets within your estate.

What Happens to an Estate If There’s No Will?

what happens to an estate if there’s no will

We all toss and turn at night wondering what’ll happen to loved ones after we’re gone, and that’s why estate planning is so important. It gives you peace of mind that the generational wealth you’ve accumulated can be passed on to help the people you love long into the future.

When a person dies with a will, their assets are distributed to loved ones as per the decedent’s wishes. But if a person dies without a valid will, their estate is distributed through a process called “intestacy.”

When a person dies “intestate,” it means a state probate court will need to decide how to distribute the decedent’s assets.

The intestacy laws of the state where the person lives determine who gets to inherit the property of the deceased person, and the laws in each state work pretty similarly in practice. Where they tend to vary is in how they define “heirs” and the proportion of the deceased person’s estate that each heir receives.

Nancy Gunnard, Of Counsel at the Massachusetts-based law firm Mirick O’Connell explains: 

“Under intestacy laws of most states, heirs include surviving spouse, children, parents, and siblings.

There are various factors that determine the heirs and distribution of property under the intestacy laws including marital status and whether the decedent has surviving children, parents, and siblings.”

But the estate’s heirs — and the proportion of a decedent’s intestate estate those heirs ultimately receive — is decided through a court proceeding. 

How Does the Intestacy Process Work?

The intestacy process starts when an individual dies without a valid will. After the decedent passes, his or her estate will normally go through probate if they owned property in their name alone.

Probate is a court-supervised legal process for settling an estate, paying creditors, and transferring the intestate estate assets. Most states have a simplified and informal probate process if the intestate estate meets certain criteria. For example, assets might qualify as a “small estate,” meaning the value of the estate doesn’t exceed a specified amount.

“When an intestate estate is probated, the court appoints a personal representative, determines heirs, and oversees the probate process. When appointing the personal representative, the court looks to the decedent’s closest relatives,” Gunnard says.

Once appointed, the personal representative has the legal authority to administer the estate, and they’re also tasked with three key responsibilities. They need to:

  • Identify, collect, manage, and value the assets of the estate

  • Decide and settle the debt and tax liabilities of the estate

  • Transfer any remaining assets to the estate’s heirs

Gunnard explains:

“In carrying out his or her responsibilities, the personal representative may have to make decisions about which assets to keep and which assets to sell, and may be responsible for selling assets such as real property or vehicles.

After satisfying any tax liability and creditors’ claims from the assets of the estate, the personal representative transfers the remaining assets of the intestate estate to the heirs.”

In most states, the transfer of assets to an heir follows a hierarchy that starts with a surviving spouse. If the person was unmarried when they died, assets normally get divided between surviving children or grandchildren before other relatives are taken into consideration.

If the personal representative of the court can find no next of kin, the intestate estate will normally pass into the ownership of the state. This process is called “escheatment.” 

What Types of Assets Can Be Passed on Through Intestacy?

assets can be passed on through intestacy

Generally speaking, an intestate estate includes all of the decedent’s personal property. Intestate estates will typically include assets like:

  • Real estate

  • Vehicles

  • Bank accounts 

  • Investment accounts

  • Jewelry 

Any assets of this nature can be awarded to designated heirs through the intestacy process.

It’s important to note there are a few key exceptions to this rule. There are some asset classes that can’t be passed on to heirs through a probate court. This includes:

  • Property that’s held jointly with a right of survivorship (like a house that’s owned as joint tenants or tenants by the entirety)

  • Jointly owned bank accounts

  • Jointly owned investment accounts

  • Jointly owned securities

  • The proceeds from an IRA, 401(k), or other retirement accounts with a named beneficiary

  • Life insurance benefits where the policy already has a named beneficiary

  • Property or accounts that have a payable-on-death designation

But the most notable exception you have to bear in mind is property held in trust can’t be included in an intestate estate. That means if you set up a trust before you die, you’re able to specify who receives which assets, even if you don’t have a will.

What Can You Avoid Intestacy Through Estate Planning?

avoid intestacy through estate planning

Gunnard explains:

“If you fail to create a will, state intestacy laws provide one for you.

While heirs under intestacy laws include the closest relatives, unfortunately, distribution of the decedent's estate is determined by state intestacy laws and does not always match the decedents’ intentions. For example, an estranged or irresponsible child may inherit under the intestacy laws, even if you do not intend for him/her to inherit anything.”

That’s where estate planning can help you ensure that your wealth is passed on to the people you choose and used in the way you see fit. It’s also worth planning for the future to spare your loved ones the probate process.

Probate is a long and costly process. It’s also public, which means anybody can see who inherited your property and what was included in your estate.

Why Set Up a Will?

According to Gunnard, the easiest and most affordable way to ensure your wishes are met is to set up a valid will.

“A will is a relatively simple and inexpensive way for you to determine who will inherit your property. In addition, a will allows you to name the personal representative of your estate and name guardians for minor children.

Another advantage of having a will is that you can specify how certain property will be handled. More importantly, a will may avoid family disputes. For example, if you think your kids will fight over who gets the Picasso hanging in your living room, you can direct that it be sold and the proceeds divided equally among the children.”

If the will and state law allow, you can even leave a memorandum ensuring you can change your wishes at any time by revising or replacing the memorandum. Just bear in mind that a memorandum isn’t legally binding on the personal representative, it simply provides guidance.

Why Set Up a Trust?

Another popular alternative when planning to pass on generational wealth is to create a trust.

A trust is a flexible estate planning tool that lets you determine who will inherit your property and avoid probate. Depending on the size of the estate and the type of trust, it can avoid estate taxes.

A trust allows you to put conditions on how and when your property is distributed, such as specifying when and for what reason trust assets can be distributed. For example, if you have a beneficiary who is a minor, you can specify that assets can only be used for college or a downpayment for a house. 

You can even specify the age (or ages) when a beneficiary is allowed to receive a distribution. 

Gunnard notes:

“Another advantage to having a trust is that property in a trust passes to beneficiaries without going through probate, making it easier to distribute the trust assets to the beneficiaries.

Trusts are private documents and do not need to be filed. Which means your nosy neighbor will never know that Picasso hanging on your living room wall was a priceless original.”

Regardless of which route you choose, proper estate planning requires organization, collaboration, and security. That’s why partnering with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy is essential.

Using Trustworthy, you’re able to upload and create digital copies of trust documents, wills, relationship verification documents, and everything in between to ensure your records are always accurate and up-to-date no matter what happens.

You can then share access to those essential documents with your attorney, members of your family, and your financial planner. This ensures everybody knows your express wishes and can produce that documentation when required after you pass away.

It saves your loved ones a lot of time, energy, and heartache — while also giving you peace of mind that the decisions you make in life can (and will) be respected long after you’re gone.

So, are you ready to get organized for the future? Explore the benefits of Trustworthy now.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Happens if You Don't Have a Will?

If you die without a valid will, your estate enters the “intestacy” process. That means a probate court will decide how to distribute your assets.

Does an Estate Have to be Divided Equally?

No. You can distribute your assets however you see fit by establishing a valid will or a trust. Likewise, if you die intestate, a probate court may decide not to distribute your estate to heirs equally.

What is the Legal Order of Next of Kin?

Next-of-kin rules vary by state. But generally speaking, most states will prioritize a surviving spouse before moving on to children, parents and then siblings.

Estate Planning

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

how are estates distributed if there's no will

Nash Riggins

Nov 7, 2023

Many Americans neglect estate planning, particularly where setting up a will is concerned. According to one recent Gallup poll, only 46% of adults in the US have a valid will. If you fall into that category, there is a process the state will carry out when you die to distribute your assets, but it isn’t very straightforward.

Read on to find out what happens to your estate when you don’t leave a will. Learn about the intestacy process and how it works, and find out how to avoid probate with proper estate planning.

Key Takeaways

  • When you die without a valid will, your estate is passed on through the intestacy process.

  • The intestacy process is when a probate court assigns a representative to value your estate, settle liabilities, and distribute the remaining assets.

  • You can avoid the probate process by setting up a value will or creating a trust to pass on assets within your estate.

What Happens to an Estate If There’s No Will?

what happens to an estate if there’s no will

We all toss and turn at night wondering what’ll happen to loved ones after we’re gone, and that’s why estate planning is so important. It gives you peace of mind that the generational wealth you’ve accumulated can be passed on to help the people you love long into the future.

When a person dies with a will, their assets are distributed to loved ones as per the decedent’s wishes. But if a person dies without a valid will, their estate is distributed through a process called “intestacy.”

When a person dies “intestate,” it means a state probate court will need to decide how to distribute the decedent’s assets.

The intestacy laws of the state where the person lives determine who gets to inherit the property of the deceased person, and the laws in each state work pretty similarly in practice. Where they tend to vary is in how they define “heirs” and the proportion of the deceased person’s estate that each heir receives.

Nancy Gunnard, Of Counsel at the Massachusetts-based law firm Mirick O’Connell explains: 

“Under intestacy laws of most states, heirs include surviving spouse, children, parents, and siblings.

There are various factors that determine the heirs and distribution of property under the intestacy laws including marital status and whether the decedent has surviving children, parents, and siblings.”

But the estate’s heirs — and the proportion of a decedent’s intestate estate those heirs ultimately receive — is decided through a court proceeding. 

How Does the Intestacy Process Work?

The intestacy process starts when an individual dies without a valid will. After the decedent passes, his or her estate will normally go through probate if they owned property in their name alone.

Probate is a court-supervised legal process for settling an estate, paying creditors, and transferring the intestate estate assets. Most states have a simplified and informal probate process if the intestate estate meets certain criteria. For example, assets might qualify as a “small estate,” meaning the value of the estate doesn’t exceed a specified amount.

“When an intestate estate is probated, the court appoints a personal representative, determines heirs, and oversees the probate process. When appointing the personal representative, the court looks to the decedent’s closest relatives,” Gunnard says.

Once appointed, the personal representative has the legal authority to administer the estate, and they’re also tasked with three key responsibilities. They need to:

  • Identify, collect, manage, and value the assets of the estate

  • Decide and settle the debt and tax liabilities of the estate

  • Transfer any remaining assets to the estate’s heirs

Gunnard explains:

“In carrying out his or her responsibilities, the personal representative may have to make decisions about which assets to keep and which assets to sell, and may be responsible for selling assets such as real property or vehicles.

After satisfying any tax liability and creditors’ claims from the assets of the estate, the personal representative transfers the remaining assets of the intestate estate to the heirs.”

In most states, the transfer of assets to an heir follows a hierarchy that starts with a surviving spouse. If the person was unmarried when they died, assets normally get divided between surviving children or grandchildren before other relatives are taken into consideration.

If the personal representative of the court can find no next of kin, the intestate estate will normally pass into the ownership of the state. This process is called “escheatment.” 

What Types of Assets Can Be Passed on Through Intestacy?

assets can be passed on through intestacy

Generally speaking, an intestate estate includes all of the decedent’s personal property. Intestate estates will typically include assets like:

  • Real estate

  • Vehicles

  • Bank accounts 

  • Investment accounts

  • Jewelry 

Any assets of this nature can be awarded to designated heirs through the intestacy process.

It’s important to note there are a few key exceptions to this rule. There are some asset classes that can’t be passed on to heirs through a probate court. This includes:

  • Property that’s held jointly with a right of survivorship (like a house that’s owned as joint tenants or tenants by the entirety)

  • Jointly owned bank accounts

  • Jointly owned investment accounts

  • Jointly owned securities

  • The proceeds from an IRA, 401(k), or other retirement accounts with a named beneficiary

  • Life insurance benefits where the policy already has a named beneficiary

  • Property or accounts that have a payable-on-death designation

But the most notable exception you have to bear in mind is property held in trust can’t be included in an intestate estate. That means if you set up a trust before you die, you’re able to specify who receives which assets, even if you don’t have a will.

What Can You Avoid Intestacy Through Estate Planning?

avoid intestacy through estate planning

Gunnard explains:

“If you fail to create a will, state intestacy laws provide one for you.

While heirs under intestacy laws include the closest relatives, unfortunately, distribution of the decedent's estate is determined by state intestacy laws and does not always match the decedents’ intentions. For example, an estranged or irresponsible child may inherit under the intestacy laws, even if you do not intend for him/her to inherit anything.”

That’s where estate planning can help you ensure that your wealth is passed on to the people you choose and used in the way you see fit. It’s also worth planning for the future to spare your loved ones the probate process.

Probate is a long and costly process. It’s also public, which means anybody can see who inherited your property and what was included in your estate.

Why Set Up a Will?

According to Gunnard, the easiest and most affordable way to ensure your wishes are met is to set up a valid will.

“A will is a relatively simple and inexpensive way for you to determine who will inherit your property. In addition, a will allows you to name the personal representative of your estate and name guardians for minor children.

Another advantage of having a will is that you can specify how certain property will be handled. More importantly, a will may avoid family disputes. For example, if you think your kids will fight over who gets the Picasso hanging in your living room, you can direct that it be sold and the proceeds divided equally among the children.”

If the will and state law allow, you can even leave a memorandum ensuring you can change your wishes at any time by revising or replacing the memorandum. Just bear in mind that a memorandum isn’t legally binding on the personal representative, it simply provides guidance.

Why Set Up a Trust?

Another popular alternative when planning to pass on generational wealth is to create a trust.

A trust is a flexible estate planning tool that lets you determine who will inherit your property and avoid probate. Depending on the size of the estate and the type of trust, it can avoid estate taxes.

A trust allows you to put conditions on how and when your property is distributed, such as specifying when and for what reason trust assets can be distributed. For example, if you have a beneficiary who is a minor, you can specify that assets can only be used for college or a downpayment for a house. 

You can even specify the age (or ages) when a beneficiary is allowed to receive a distribution. 

Gunnard notes:

“Another advantage to having a trust is that property in a trust passes to beneficiaries without going through probate, making it easier to distribute the trust assets to the beneficiaries.

Trusts are private documents and do not need to be filed. Which means your nosy neighbor will never know that Picasso hanging on your living room wall was a priceless original.”

Regardless of which route you choose, proper estate planning requires organization, collaboration, and security. That’s why partnering with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy is essential.

Using Trustworthy, you’re able to upload and create digital copies of trust documents, wills, relationship verification documents, and everything in between to ensure your records are always accurate and up-to-date no matter what happens.

You can then share access to those essential documents with your attorney, members of your family, and your financial planner. This ensures everybody knows your express wishes and can produce that documentation when required after you pass away.

It saves your loved ones a lot of time, energy, and heartache — while also giving you peace of mind that the decisions you make in life can (and will) be respected long after you’re gone.

So, are you ready to get organized for the future? Explore the benefits of Trustworthy now.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Happens if You Don't Have a Will?

If you die without a valid will, your estate enters the “intestacy” process. That means a probate court will decide how to distribute your assets.

Does an Estate Have to be Divided Equally?

No. You can distribute your assets however you see fit by establishing a valid will or a trust. Likewise, if you die intestate, a probate court may decide not to distribute your estate to heirs equally.

What is the Legal Order of Next of Kin?

Next-of-kin rules vary by state. But generally speaking, most states will prioritize a surviving spouse before moving on to children, parents and then siblings.

Estate Planning

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

how are estates distributed if there's no will

Nash Riggins

Nov 7, 2023

Many Americans neglect estate planning, particularly where setting up a will is concerned. According to one recent Gallup poll, only 46% of adults in the US have a valid will. If you fall into that category, there is a process the state will carry out when you die to distribute your assets, but it isn’t very straightforward.

Read on to find out what happens to your estate when you don’t leave a will. Learn about the intestacy process and how it works, and find out how to avoid probate with proper estate planning.

Key Takeaways

  • When you die without a valid will, your estate is passed on through the intestacy process.

  • The intestacy process is when a probate court assigns a representative to value your estate, settle liabilities, and distribute the remaining assets.

  • You can avoid the probate process by setting up a value will or creating a trust to pass on assets within your estate.

What Happens to an Estate If There’s No Will?

what happens to an estate if there’s no will

We all toss and turn at night wondering what’ll happen to loved ones after we’re gone, and that’s why estate planning is so important. It gives you peace of mind that the generational wealth you’ve accumulated can be passed on to help the people you love long into the future.

When a person dies with a will, their assets are distributed to loved ones as per the decedent’s wishes. But if a person dies without a valid will, their estate is distributed through a process called “intestacy.”

When a person dies “intestate,” it means a state probate court will need to decide how to distribute the decedent’s assets.

The intestacy laws of the state where the person lives determine who gets to inherit the property of the deceased person, and the laws in each state work pretty similarly in practice. Where they tend to vary is in how they define “heirs” and the proportion of the deceased person’s estate that each heir receives.

Nancy Gunnard, Of Counsel at the Massachusetts-based law firm Mirick O’Connell explains: 

“Under intestacy laws of most states, heirs include surviving spouse, children, parents, and siblings.

There are various factors that determine the heirs and distribution of property under the intestacy laws including marital status and whether the decedent has surviving children, parents, and siblings.”

But the estate’s heirs — and the proportion of a decedent’s intestate estate those heirs ultimately receive — is decided through a court proceeding. 

How Does the Intestacy Process Work?

The intestacy process starts when an individual dies without a valid will. After the decedent passes, his or her estate will normally go through probate if they owned property in their name alone.

Probate is a court-supervised legal process for settling an estate, paying creditors, and transferring the intestate estate assets. Most states have a simplified and informal probate process if the intestate estate meets certain criteria. For example, assets might qualify as a “small estate,” meaning the value of the estate doesn’t exceed a specified amount.

“When an intestate estate is probated, the court appoints a personal representative, determines heirs, and oversees the probate process. When appointing the personal representative, the court looks to the decedent’s closest relatives,” Gunnard says.

Once appointed, the personal representative has the legal authority to administer the estate, and they’re also tasked with three key responsibilities. They need to:

  • Identify, collect, manage, and value the assets of the estate

  • Decide and settle the debt and tax liabilities of the estate

  • Transfer any remaining assets to the estate’s heirs

Gunnard explains:

“In carrying out his or her responsibilities, the personal representative may have to make decisions about which assets to keep and which assets to sell, and may be responsible for selling assets such as real property or vehicles.

After satisfying any tax liability and creditors’ claims from the assets of the estate, the personal representative transfers the remaining assets of the intestate estate to the heirs.”

In most states, the transfer of assets to an heir follows a hierarchy that starts with a surviving spouse. If the person was unmarried when they died, assets normally get divided between surviving children or grandchildren before other relatives are taken into consideration.

If the personal representative of the court can find no next of kin, the intestate estate will normally pass into the ownership of the state. This process is called “escheatment.” 

What Types of Assets Can Be Passed on Through Intestacy?

assets can be passed on through intestacy

Generally speaking, an intestate estate includes all of the decedent’s personal property. Intestate estates will typically include assets like:

  • Real estate

  • Vehicles

  • Bank accounts 

  • Investment accounts

  • Jewelry 

Any assets of this nature can be awarded to designated heirs through the intestacy process.

It’s important to note there are a few key exceptions to this rule. There are some asset classes that can’t be passed on to heirs through a probate court. This includes:

  • Property that’s held jointly with a right of survivorship (like a house that’s owned as joint tenants or tenants by the entirety)

  • Jointly owned bank accounts

  • Jointly owned investment accounts

  • Jointly owned securities

  • The proceeds from an IRA, 401(k), or other retirement accounts with a named beneficiary

  • Life insurance benefits where the policy already has a named beneficiary

  • Property or accounts that have a payable-on-death designation

But the most notable exception you have to bear in mind is property held in trust can’t be included in an intestate estate. That means if you set up a trust before you die, you’re able to specify who receives which assets, even if you don’t have a will.

What Can You Avoid Intestacy Through Estate Planning?

avoid intestacy through estate planning

Gunnard explains:

“If you fail to create a will, state intestacy laws provide one for you.

While heirs under intestacy laws include the closest relatives, unfortunately, distribution of the decedent's estate is determined by state intestacy laws and does not always match the decedents’ intentions. For example, an estranged or irresponsible child may inherit under the intestacy laws, even if you do not intend for him/her to inherit anything.”

That’s where estate planning can help you ensure that your wealth is passed on to the people you choose and used in the way you see fit. It’s also worth planning for the future to spare your loved ones the probate process.

Probate is a long and costly process. It’s also public, which means anybody can see who inherited your property and what was included in your estate.

Why Set Up a Will?

According to Gunnard, the easiest and most affordable way to ensure your wishes are met is to set up a valid will.

“A will is a relatively simple and inexpensive way for you to determine who will inherit your property. In addition, a will allows you to name the personal representative of your estate and name guardians for minor children.

Another advantage of having a will is that you can specify how certain property will be handled. More importantly, a will may avoid family disputes. For example, if you think your kids will fight over who gets the Picasso hanging in your living room, you can direct that it be sold and the proceeds divided equally among the children.”

If the will and state law allow, you can even leave a memorandum ensuring you can change your wishes at any time by revising or replacing the memorandum. Just bear in mind that a memorandum isn’t legally binding on the personal representative, it simply provides guidance.

Why Set Up a Trust?

Another popular alternative when planning to pass on generational wealth is to create a trust.

A trust is a flexible estate planning tool that lets you determine who will inherit your property and avoid probate. Depending on the size of the estate and the type of trust, it can avoid estate taxes.

A trust allows you to put conditions on how and when your property is distributed, such as specifying when and for what reason trust assets can be distributed. For example, if you have a beneficiary who is a minor, you can specify that assets can only be used for college or a downpayment for a house. 

You can even specify the age (or ages) when a beneficiary is allowed to receive a distribution. 

Gunnard notes:

“Another advantage to having a trust is that property in a trust passes to beneficiaries without going through probate, making it easier to distribute the trust assets to the beneficiaries.

Trusts are private documents and do not need to be filed. Which means your nosy neighbor will never know that Picasso hanging on your living room wall was a priceless original.”

Regardless of which route you choose, proper estate planning requires organization, collaboration, and security. That’s why partnering with a Family Operating System® like Trustworthy is essential.

Using Trustworthy, you’re able to upload and create digital copies of trust documents, wills, relationship verification documents, and everything in between to ensure your records are always accurate and up-to-date no matter what happens.

You can then share access to those essential documents with your attorney, members of your family, and your financial planner. This ensures everybody knows your express wishes and can produce that documentation when required after you pass away.

It saves your loved ones a lot of time, energy, and heartache — while also giving you peace of mind that the decisions you make in life can (and will) be respected long after you’re gone.

So, are you ready to get organized for the future? Explore the benefits of Trustworthy now.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Happens if You Don't Have a Will?

If you die without a valid will, your estate enters the “intestacy” process. That means a probate court will decide how to distribute your assets.

Does an Estate Have to be Divided Equally?

No. You can distribute your assets however you see fit by establishing a valid will or a trust. Likewise, if you die intestate, a probate court may decide not to distribute your estate to heirs equally.

What is the Legal Order of Next of Kin?

Next-of-kin rules vary by state. But generally speaking, most states will prioritize a surviving spouse before moving on to children, parents and then siblings.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

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Hospice Care Timeline: Estimating How Long to Live

doctor-ordered hospice care
doctor-ordered hospice care
doctor-ordered hospice care

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Doctor-Ordered Hospice Care: When and Why It Happens

funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline

Feb 20, 2024

Funeral Planning Timeline: How Long Does it Really Take?

writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband

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Writing a Heartfelt Obituary for Your Husband: Inspiring Examples

planning your funeral
planning your funeral
planning your funeral

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Planning Your Funeral: The Best Age To Start

crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son

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Crafting a Loving Obituary For Your Son: Meaningful Examples

improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors

Jan 18, 2024

Improving Communication Between Caregivers and Doctors

copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate

Nov 29, 2023

Can Anyone Get a Copy of a Death Certificate? Who Is Authorized?

original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy

Nov 25, 2023

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy

Nov 25, 2023

How Do You Handle Negative Aspects of the Deceased's Life in a Eulogy?

more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral

Nov 25, 2023

Can There Be More Then One Eulogy at a Funeral? Etiquette Explained

parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension

Nov 24, 2023

My Dad Died, Can I Get His Retirement Pension?

death certificate copies
death certificate copies
death certificate copies

Nov 24, 2023

How Many Copies of a Death Certificate Should You Get?

can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny

Nov 24, 2023

Can a Eulogy Be Funny? Yes, Here Are 10 Respectful but Funny Examples

receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues

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How Do You Receive Inheritance Money WITHOUT any issues?

tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person

Nov 17, 2023

Who Gets The Tax Refund of A Deceased Person? An Accountant Answers

how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy

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How To Start a Eulogy: 15 Heartfelt Examples

son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously

Nov 14, 2023

How To Discuss End-of-Life Care With Parents (Simple Guide)

how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions

Nov 14, 2023

How To Cancel a Deceased Person's Subscriptions the EASY Way

what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy

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What Should You Not Put in a Eulogy (9 Things To Avoid)

how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will

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How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template

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Does Microsoft Word Have an Obituary Template?

how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook

Nov 6, 2023

How To Post an Obituary on Facebook: A Step-by-Step Guide

death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process

Nov 6, 2023

Why Do You Need A Death Certificate For Estate & Probate Process?

correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate

Nov 2, 2023

How Do I Correct Errors on a Death Certificate? And, How Long Does It Take?

steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps For Writing a Eulogy For Mom

steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps for Writing a Eulogy for Dad

who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies

Nov 1, 2023

Who Does The Obituary When Someone Dies?

Nov 1, 2023

How Late Is Too Late For An Obituary? 6 Steps To Take Today

how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost

Nov 1, 2023

How Much Does It Cost To Publish An Obituary? Breaking It Down

reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary

Nov 1, 2023

6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary

Oct 30, 2023

Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

Oct 30, 2023

Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

Oct 5, 2023

Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

Sep 14, 2023

I'm Trapped Caring for Elderly Parents

401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors

Oct 5, 2023

401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k

Sep 12, 2023

How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

grandparents
grandparents
grandparents

Aug 3, 2023

The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

Aug 3, 2023

The Essential Guide to Preparing for Retirement

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

Jul 14, 2023

Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

Jun 7, 2023

How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

Jun 6, 2023

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

Jun 6, 2023

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

Jun 6, 2023

How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

Jun 6, 2023

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

May 17, 2023

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

May 2, 2023

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

May 1, 2023

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document

Apr 15, 2023

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

Apr 15, 2023

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

Apr 15, 2023

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

Apr 15, 2023

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Apr 15, 2023

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Apr 15, 2023

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

Apr 15, 2023

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

White house
White house
White house

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Better To Sell or Rent An Inherited House? (Pros & Cons)

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice
Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Apr 15, 2023

Is It Wrong To Move Away From Elderly Parents? My Advice

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent Into Your Home: What To Know

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know
Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

Apr 15, 2023

Moving An Elderly Parent to Another State: What To Know

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers
What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

Apr 15, 2023

What If Witnesses To A Will Cannot Be Found? A Lawyer Answers

A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them
A couple reviewing documents and signing them

Apr 15, 2023

What To Bring To Estate Planning Meeting (Checklist)

A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional
A couple in a meeting with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

When Should You Get An Estate Plan? (According To A Lawyer)

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?
Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Apr 15, 2023

Which Sibling Should Take Care of Elderly Parents?

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)
Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Who Can Override A Power of Attorney? (A Lawyer Answers)

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?
Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Apr 15, 2023

Can Power of Attorney Sell Property Before Death?

Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand
Person at a coffee shop using their laptop with a credit card in hand

Apr 15, 2023

Can The Executor Of A Will Access Bank Accounts? (Yes, Here's How)

Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional
Elderly parents working with a professional

Apr 15, 2023

Complete List of Things To Do For Elderly Parents (Checklist)

Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer
Reviewing paperwork with lawyer

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For A Deceased Person?

Apr 15, 2023

How To Help Elderly Parents From A Distance? 7 Tips

Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents
Woman talking with her parents

Apr 15, 2023

Legal Documents For Elderly Parents: Checklist

House
House
House

Apr 15, 2023

Selling Elderly Parents Home: How To Do It + Mistakes To Avoid

Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache
Elderly woman who looks like she has a headache

Apr 15, 2023

What To Do When A Sibling Is Manipulating Elderly Parents

Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork
Two men reviewing paperwork

Apr 6, 2023

Can An Out of State Attorney Write My Will? (A Lawyer Answers)

People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills
People working at a computer, working on a stack of bills

Mar 15, 2023

Settling an Estate: A Step-by-Step Guide

Check on the table
Check on the table
Check on the table

Feb 10, 2023

My Deceased Husband Received A Check In The Mail (4 Steps To Take)

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney
The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

Feb 7, 2023

The Benefits of Working With an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)
How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Feb 6, 2023

How To Track Elderly Parents' Phone (2 Options)

Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form
Someone filling out a social security benefits application form

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Collect Your Parents' Social Security When They Die?

Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book
Veteran Benefits book

Feb 1, 2023

How Do I Stop VA Benefits When Someone Dies (Simple Guide)

Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand
Person typing on a laptop with a credit card in hand

Feb 1, 2023

Can You Pay Money Into A Deceased Person's Bank Account?

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)
Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Feb 1, 2023

Deleting A Facebook Account When Someone Dies (Step by Step)

Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.
Two people sitting across a desk speaking to each other with papers on desk.

Feb 1, 2023

Does The DMV Know When Someone Dies?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Feb 1, 2023

How To Find A Deceased Person's Lawyer (5 Ways)

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)
How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Plan A Celebration Of Life (10 Steps With Examples)

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide
How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Feb 1, 2023

How To Stop Mail Of A Deceased Person? A Simple Guide

Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form
Social security card, 1040 form

Feb 1, 2023

How to Stop Social Security Direct Deposit After Death

Firearm
Firearm
Firearm

Feb 1, 2023

How To Transfer Firearms From A Deceased Person (3 Steps)

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)
How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Feb 1, 2023

How To Write An Obituary (5 Steps With Examples)

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)
Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Feb 1, 2023

Unlock iPhone When Someone Dies (5 Things To Try)

Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road
Close-up of a tire on silver car on a road

Feb 1, 2023

What Happens To A Leased Vehicle When Someone Dies?

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know
Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Jan 31, 2023

Do Wills Expire? 6 Things To Know

Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop
Person typing on a laptop

Jan 31, 2023

How To Get Into a Deceased Person's Computer (Microsoft & Apple)

Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation
Fingerprint documentation

Jan 31, 2023

Why Do Funeral Homes Take Fingerprints of the Deceased?

Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home
Foreclosure in front of a home

Jan 31, 2023

What To Do If Your Deceased Parents' Home Is In Foreclosure

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)
Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Jan 31, 2023

Questions To Ask An Estate Attorney After Death (Checklist)

Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer
Woman looking stressed while holding a document at her computer

Jan 31, 2023

What Happens If a Deceased Individual Owes Taxes?

Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional
Elderly people talking with professional

Jan 31, 2023

Components of Estate Planning: 6 Things To Consider

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person
What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Jan 22, 2023

What To Do If Insurance Check Is Made Out To A Deceased Person

Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives
Scattered photograph negatives

Jan 8, 2023

What Does a Typical Estate Plan Include?

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)
Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Apr 15, 2022

Can I Do A Video Will? (Is It Legitimate & What To Consider)

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2022

Estate Planning For Green Card Holders (Complete Guide)

Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom
Chair in a bedroom

Mar 2, 2022

What Does Your “Property” Mean?

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is the Uniform Trust Code? What is the Uniform Probate Code?

Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales
Female statue balancing scales

Mar 2, 2022

Do You Need to Avoid Probate?

Person signing document
Person signing document
Person signing document

Mar 2, 2022

How is a Trust Created?

stethoscope
stethoscope
stethoscope

Mar 2, 2022

What Are Advance Directives?

Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach
Couple standing on the beach

Mar 2, 2022

What does a Trustee Do?

Large house exterior
Large house exterior
Large house exterior

Mar 2, 2022

What is an Estate Plan? (And why you need one)

Gavel
Gavel
Gavel

Mar 2, 2022

What is Probate?

United States Map
United States Map
United States Map

Mar 2, 2022

What Is Your Domicile & Why It Matters

Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork
Man organizing paperwork

Mar 2, 2022

What Is a Power of Attorney for Finances?

A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed
A baby and toddler lying on a bed

Mar 1, 2022

Should your family consider an umbrella insurance policy?

Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks
Woman typing on laptop on a table with tea, plant, notebooks

Mar 1, 2022

Do I need a digital power of attorney?

Person signing documents
Person signing documents
Person signing documents

Apr 6, 2020

What Exactly is a Trust?