VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

|

Mar 23, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

va benefits timeline

VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

|

Mar 23, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

|

Mar 23, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

va benefits timeline

VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

|

Mar 23, 2024

Trustworthy is an intelligent digital vault that protects and optimizes your family's information so that you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind.

va benefits timeline

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

If your loved one served in this country, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will honor them with benefits, which you may be entitled to. These benefits are issued mainly through the life insurance program, burial and memorial services, and dependents and survivors program. However, you may wonder how these VA benefits work and whether you claim some of them after your loved one passes away.  

This guide explores who can claim VA benefits after death and when these benefits come to an end. We’ll also explain how to claim them.


Key Takeaways 

  • Both spouses and children can claim VA pensions if their loved one dies as long as they meet the eligibility requirements.
     

  • Spouses are entitled to VA pensions, DIC payments, and a burial allowance.

  • It takes an average of 158 days to receive claimed benefits. 


Can Your Spouse Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your spouse claim your va pension if you die

You did your duty for their country, and even after you pass away, this honor passes to your spouse in the form of VA benefits

Paul Corbett, a U.S. Marine veteran and public affairs officer at the VA, says:

“The VA helps surviving spouses of veterans cope with financial challenges by providing supplemental income through the survivor's pension benefit program. Payments are made to bring the survivor’s total income, including other retirement or social security income, to a level set by Congress.”

There are three criteria determining whether your spouse can claim your VA pension. You need to meet at least one of them: 

  • You entered active duty before September 7, 1980, and served a minimum of 90 days with one day served in a wartime period.  

  • You entered active duty after September 7, 1980, and served at least 24 months, or your full period of called duty and at least one day served in a wartime period.

  • You were an officer who started active duty after October 16, 1981, with no active duty served 24 months prior. 

Some covered wartime periods include World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. For your spouse to be eligible, some financial requirements must be met, like a net worth limit. Congress sets the actual pension paid to your spouse, which is known as the maximum annual pension rate (MAPR). 

The VA calculates your spouse’s net worth, which includes income and assets (real estate and personal items like furniture). Education and medical expenses are deducted from the income. If the total income is less than $155,356, your spouse can claim your VA pension because this benefit supports low-income spouses. 

The annual cost of living also determines the amount your spouse is eligible for. This pension is a tax-free benefit.  

Keep track of all your important pension documents by storing them in one secure location like Trustworthy. Trustworthy is a family operating system families across the country use to keep their important documents organized. The easy-to-use collaboration features allow you to share pension details with your spouse. 


Can Your Child Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your child claim your va pension if you die

If you die, your child can also claim your VA pension. However, they must meet some requirements to be eligible for these benefits. 

First, they must be unmarried to qualify. If they’re married, they cannot claim your pension. If your child is unmarried and at least one of the factors below is true, they qualify to claim your VA pension: 

  • They’re under 18 years of age. 

  • They’re under 23 years of age and are attending a VA-approved school/ training institution. 

  • They’re unable to care for themselves because of a disability that happened to them before 18 years of age. 

The income and net worth requirements are also applied to your child’s claim. The MAPR decides the amount paid to your child, which is dependent on how many children you have who will claim your pension.

Store all necessary documents and information, and share them with your child on Trustworthy to alleviate stress.


What VA Benefits Include After Death

The VA offers several survivor benefits your family can access after your death. One is a low-cost group insurance program called Servicemember’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI), which gives veterans peace of mind that their family is taken care of after their death.  

When you pass away, your loved ones are covered by a number of different benefits from survivor programs like the following: 

  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

  • The Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

  • The Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35)

  • A Survivors’ Pension

The DIC is a monthly benefit to your spouse. The VA will provide them with a monthly stipend. This payment is different from the survivor's pension. 

The amount paid will depend on financial needs. For example, a surviving spouse typically receives an average of $1,612 per month. However, if you had a disability relating to your service for at least eight years before your death, this amount is raised by $342 per month. 

This benefit is available to claim by your spouse (even if they remarry) and your child. Your surviving parents can also claim VA benefits after your death. The amount they can claim depends on their income and whether one or both parents are still alive. 

Other VA benefits after death include burial and memorial benefits. Spouses and children can claim an allowance to cover burial and memorial costs, which include expenses for the plot, a headstone, and transportation of the veteran's remains to the gravesite. 

The actual allowance amount will vary depending on the circumstances of your death. For example, if you passed away after October 1, 2023, your spouse or child will receive $948 for the burial and $948 for the gravesite. Headstones are allocated at $231 if you pass away after October 1, 2021. 

The VA also offers grief counseling and transition support to your spouse or child should you pass away while on active duty. 


When VA Benefits Stop After Death

when do va benefits stop after death

It’s important for your spouse and child to know VA benefits may stop after your death, depending on a few circumstances. 

If your spouse remarries after they’re 55 and before they’re 57, DIC benefits will stop. However, the survivor's pension benefit will not stop after death as long as it’s paid to your spouse or child. 

Should either of them no longer qualify for these benefits, they’ll stop. Other benefits, such as the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, stop 20 years after the date of death. 

Keep this information readily available on Trustworthy and give your spouse and child easy access.     

Steps to Receive VA Benefits

So, how does your spouse or child claim these VA benefits, and how long does it take? Before you begin the process, it’s important to note receiving VA benefits takes a while.

File the Claim 

First, your spouse or child will need to file a claim. They can do this online, by mail, fax, or in person at the nearest VA office. They must collect all evidence needed for the claim, which includes VA medical records and supporting statements.

Claim Received Notification 

After the claim is submitted, they’ll receive a notification. Online submissions have instant notifications, and if they submit via mail, the notification could take at least one week. 

The Claim Is Reviewed, and Evidence Is Gathered 

During this stage, there is nothing to do but wait while the VA reviews the claim, reviews the evidence, and gathers its own evidence from various sources.  

Receive the Claim Packet 

Once the decision is made, the claim packet, which includes the details of the decision, is sent through the U.S. mail. This takes 7-10 business days. 

The entire claims process can take an average of 158 days to complete


Frequently Asked Questions

Who will get money after the death of a military veteran?

The money of a military veteran will go to their surviving spouse, child, or eligible family members. 

How much money do you get from VA benefits?

The amount will differ depending on your circumstances, but the average monthly payment is around $1,612 per month. 

What happens to DIC if a spouse remarries?

If the spouse remarries after 55 years old and before 57 years old, the DIC payments will stop.  

Can you get VA compensation if the veteran died from causes unrelated to military service?

No, the veteran must have died while on active duty, inactive duty but in training, or as a result of a service-related disability or condition.

If your loved one served in this country, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will honor them with benefits, which you may be entitled to. These benefits are issued mainly through the life insurance program, burial and memorial services, and dependents and survivors program. However, you may wonder how these VA benefits work and whether you claim some of them after your loved one passes away.  

This guide explores who can claim VA benefits after death and when these benefits come to an end. We’ll also explain how to claim them.


Key Takeaways 

  • Both spouses and children can claim VA pensions if their loved one dies as long as they meet the eligibility requirements.
     

  • Spouses are entitled to VA pensions, DIC payments, and a burial allowance.

  • It takes an average of 158 days to receive claimed benefits. 


Can Your Spouse Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your spouse claim your va pension if you die

You did your duty for their country, and even after you pass away, this honor passes to your spouse in the form of VA benefits

Paul Corbett, a U.S. Marine veteran and public affairs officer at the VA, says:

“The VA helps surviving spouses of veterans cope with financial challenges by providing supplemental income through the survivor's pension benefit program. Payments are made to bring the survivor’s total income, including other retirement or social security income, to a level set by Congress.”

There are three criteria determining whether your spouse can claim your VA pension. You need to meet at least one of them: 

  • You entered active duty before September 7, 1980, and served a minimum of 90 days with one day served in a wartime period.  

  • You entered active duty after September 7, 1980, and served at least 24 months, or your full period of called duty and at least one day served in a wartime period.

  • You were an officer who started active duty after October 16, 1981, with no active duty served 24 months prior. 

Some covered wartime periods include World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. For your spouse to be eligible, some financial requirements must be met, like a net worth limit. Congress sets the actual pension paid to your spouse, which is known as the maximum annual pension rate (MAPR). 

The VA calculates your spouse’s net worth, which includes income and assets (real estate and personal items like furniture). Education and medical expenses are deducted from the income. If the total income is less than $155,356, your spouse can claim your VA pension because this benefit supports low-income spouses. 

The annual cost of living also determines the amount your spouse is eligible for. This pension is a tax-free benefit.  

Keep track of all your important pension documents by storing them in one secure location like Trustworthy. Trustworthy is a family operating system families across the country use to keep their important documents organized. The easy-to-use collaboration features allow you to share pension details with your spouse. 


Can Your Child Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your child claim your va pension if you die

If you die, your child can also claim your VA pension. However, they must meet some requirements to be eligible for these benefits. 

First, they must be unmarried to qualify. If they’re married, they cannot claim your pension. If your child is unmarried and at least one of the factors below is true, they qualify to claim your VA pension: 

  • They’re under 18 years of age. 

  • They’re under 23 years of age and are attending a VA-approved school/ training institution. 

  • They’re unable to care for themselves because of a disability that happened to them before 18 years of age. 

The income and net worth requirements are also applied to your child’s claim. The MAPR decides the amount paid to your child, which is dependent on how many children you have who will claim your pension.

Store all necessary documents and information, and share them with your child on Trustworthy to alleviate stress.


What VA Benefits Include After Death

The VA offers several survivor benefits your family can access after your death. One is a low-cost group insurance program called Servicemember’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI), which gives veterans peace of mind that their family is taken care of after their death.  

When you pass away, your loved ones are covered by a number of different benefits from survivor programs like the following: 

  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

  • The Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

  • The Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35)

  • A Survivors’ Pension

The DIC is a monthly benefit to your spouse. The VA will provide them with a monthly stipend. This payment is different from the survivor's pension. 

The amount paid will depend on financial needs. For example, a surviving spouse typically receives an average of $1,612 per month. However, if you had a disability relating to your service for at least eight years before your death, this amount is raised by $342 per month. 

This benefit is available to claim by your spouse (even if they remarry) and your child. Your surviving parents can also claim VA benefits after your death. The amount they can claim depends on their income and whether one or both parents are still alive. 

Other VA benefits after death include burial and memorial benefits. Spouses and children can claim an allowance to cover burial and memorial costs, which include expenses for the plot, a headstone, and transportation of the veteran's remains to the gravesite. 

The actual allowance amount will vary depending on the circumstances of your death. For example, if you passed away after October 1, 2023, your spouse or child will receive $948 for the burial and $948 for the gravesite. Headstones are allocated at $231 if you pass away after October 1, 2021. 

The VA also offers grief counseling and transition support to your spouse or child should you pass away while on active duty. 


When VA Benefits Stop After Death

when do va benefits stop after death

It’s important for your spouse and child to know VA benefits may stop after your death, depending on a few circumstances. 

If your spouse remarries after they’re 55 and before they’re 57, DIC benefits will stop. However, the survivor's pension benefit will not stop after death as long as it’s paid to your spouse or child. 

Should either of them no longer qualify for these benefits, they’ll stop. Other benefits, such as the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, stop 20 years after the date of death. 

Keep this information readily available on Trustworthy and give your spouse and child easy access.     

Steps to Receive VA Benefits

So, how does your spouse or child claim these VA benefits, and how long does it take? Before you begin the process, it’s important to note receiving VA benefits takes a while.

File the Claim 

First, your spouse or child will need to file a claim. They can do this online, by mail, fax, or in person at the nearest VA office. They must collect all evidence needed for the claim, which includes VA medical records and supporting statements.

Claim Received Notification 

After the claim is submitted, they’ll receive a notification. Online submissions have instant notifications, and if they submit via mail, the notification could take at least one week. 

The Claim Is Reviewed, and Evidence Is Gathered 

During this stage, there is nothing to do but wait while the VA reviews the claim, reviews the evidence, and gathers its own evidence from various sources.  

Receive the Claim Packet 

Once the decision is made, the claim packet, which includes the details of the decision, is sent through the U.S. mail. This takes 7-10 business days. 

The entire claims process can take an average of 158 days to complete


Frequently Asked Questions

Who will get money after the death of a military veteran?

The money of a military veteran will go to their surviving spouse, child, or eligible family members. 

How much money do you get from VA benefits?

The amount will differ depending on your circumstances, but the average monthly payment is around $1,612 per month. 

What happens to DIC if a spouse remarries?

If the spouse remarries after 55 years old and before 57 years old, the DIC payments will stop.  

Can you get VA compensation if the veteran died from causes unrelated to military service?

No, the veteran must have died while on active duty, inactive duty but in training, or as a result of a service-related disability or condition.

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

If your loved one served in this country, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will honor them with benefits, which you may be entitled to. These benefits are issued mainly through the life insurance program, burial and memorial services, and dependents and survivors program. However, you may wonder how these VA benefits work and whether you claim some of them after your loved one passes away.  

This guide explores who can claim VA benefits after death and when these benefits come to an end. We’ll also explain how to claim them.


Key Takeaways 

  • Both spouses and children can claim VA pensions if their loved one dies as long as they meet the eligibility requirements.
     

  • Spouses are entitled to VA pensions, DIC payments, and a burial allowance.

  • It takes an average of 158 days to receive claimed benefits. 


Can Your Spouse Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your spouse claim your va pension if you die

You did your duty for their country, and even after you pass away, this honor passes to your spouse in the form of VA benefits

Paul Corbett, a U.S. Marine veteran and public affairs officer at the VA, says:

“The VA helps surviving spouses of veterans cope with financial challenges by providing supplemental income through the survivor's pension benefit program. Payments are made to bring the survivor’s total income, including other retirement or social security income, to a level set by Congress.”

There are three criteria determining whether your spouse can claim your VA pension. You need to meet at least one of them: 

  • You entered active duty before September 7, 1980, and served a minimum of 90 days with one day served in a wartime period.  

  • You entered active duty after September 7, 1980, and served at least 24 months, or your full period of called duty and at least one day served in a wartime period.

  • You were an officer who started active duty after October 16, 1981, with no active duty served 24 months prior. 

Some covered wartime periods include World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. For your spouse to be eligible, some financial requirements must be met, like a net worth limit. Congress sets the actual pension paid to your spouse, which is known as the maximum annual pension rate (MAPR). 

The VA calculates your spouse’s net worth, which includes income and assets (real estate and personal items like furniture). Education and medical expenses are deducted from the income. If the total income is less than $155,356, your spouse can claim your VA pension because this benefit supports low-income spouses. 

The annual cost of living also determines the amount your spouse is eligible for. This pension is a tax-free benefit.  

Keep track of all your important pension documents by storing them in one secure location like Trustworthy. Trustworthy is a family operating system families across the country use to keep their important documents organized. The easy-to-use collaboration features allow you to share pension details with your spouse. 


Can Your Child Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your child claim your va pension if you die

If you die, your child can also claim your VA pension. However, they must meet some requirements to be eligible for these benefits. 

First, they must be unmarried to qualify. If they’re married, they cannot claim your pension. If your child is unmarried and at least one of the factors below is true, they qualify to claim your VA pension: 

  • They’re under 18 years of age. 

  • They’re under 23 years of age and are attending a VA-approved school/ training institution. 

  • They’re unable to care for themselves because of a disability that happened to them before 18 years of age. 

The income and net worth requirements are also applied to your child’s claim. The MAPR decides the amount paid to your child, which is dependent on how many children you have who will claim your pension.

Store all necessary documents and information, and share them with your child on Trustworthy to alleviate stress.


What VA Benefits Include After Death

The VA offers several survivor benefits your family can access after your death. One is a low-cost group insurance program called Servicemember’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI), which gives veterans peace of mind that their family is taken care of after their death.  

When you pass away, your loved ones are covered by a number of different benefits from survivor programs like the following: 

  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

  • The Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

  • The Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35)

  • A Survivors’ Pension

The DIC is a monthly benefit to your spouse. The VA will provide them with a monthly stipend. This payment is different from the survivor's pension. 

The amount paid will depend on financial needs. For example, a surviving spouse typically receives an average of $1,612 per month. However, if you had a disability relating to your service for at least eight years before your death, this amount is raised by $342 per month. 

This benefit is available to claim by your spouse (even if they remarry) and your child. Your surviving parents can also claim VA benefits after your death. The amount they can claim depends on their income and whether one or both parents are still alive. 

Other VA benefits after death include burial and memorial benefits. Spouses and children can claim an allowance to cover burial and memorial costs, which include expenses for the plot, a headstone, and transportation of the veteran's remains to the gravesite. 

The actual allowance amount will vary depending on the circumstances of your death. For example, if you passed away after October 1, 2023, your spouse or child will receive $948 for the burial and $948 for the gravesite. Headstones are allocated at $231 if you pass away after October 1, 2021. 

The VA also offers grief counseling and transition support to your spouse or child should you pass away while on active duty. 


When VA Benefits Stop After Death

when do va benefits stop after death

It’s important for your spouse and child to know VA benefits may stop after your death, depending on a few circumstances. 

If your spouse remarries after they’re 55 and before they’re 57, DIC benefits will stop. However, the survivor's pension benefit will not stop after death as long as it’s paid to your spouse or child. 

Should either of them no longer qualify for these benefits, they’ll stop. Other benefits, such as the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, stop 20 years after the date of death. 

Keep this information readily available on Trustworthy and give your spouse and child easy access.     

Steps to Receive VA Benefits

So, how does your spouse or child claim these VA benefits, and how long does it take? Before you begin the process, it’s important to note receiving VA benefits takes a while.

File the Claim 

First, your spouse or child will need to file a claim. They can do this online, by mail, fax, or in person at the nearest VA office. They must collect all evidence needed for the claim, which includes VA medical records and supporting statements.

Claim Received Notification 

After the claim is submitted, they’ll receive a notification. Online submissions have instant notifications, and if they submit via mail, the notification could take at least one week. 

The Claim Is Reviewed, and Evidence Is Gathered 

During this stage, there is nothing to do but wait while the VA reviews the claim, reviews the evidence, and gathers its own evidence from various sources.  

Receive the Claim Packet 

Once the decision is made, the claim packet, which includes the details of the decision, is sent through the U.S. mail. This takes 7-10 business days. 

The entire claims process can take an average of 158 days to complete


Frequently Asked Questions

Who will get money after the death of a military veteran?

The money of a military veteran will go to their surviving spouse, child, or eligible family members. 

How much money do you get from VA benefits?

The amount will differ depending on your circumstances, but the average monthly payment is around $1,612 per month. 

What happens to DIC if a spouse remarries?

If the spouse remarries after 55 years old and before 57 years old, the DIC payments will stop.  

Can you get VA compensation if the veteran died from causes unrelated to military service?

No, the veteran must have died while on active duty, inactive duty but in training, or as a result of a service-related disability or condition.

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

If your loved one served in this country, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will honor them with benefits, which you may be entitled to. These benefits are issued mainly through the life insurance program, burial and memorial services, and dependents and survivors program. However, you may wonder how these VA benefits work and whether you claim some of them after your loved one passes away.  

This guide explores who can claim VA benefits after death and when these benefits come to an end. We’ll also explain how to claim them.


Key Takeaways 

  • Both spouses and children can claim VA pensions if their loved one dies as long as they meet the eligibility requirements.
     

  • Spouses are entitled to VA pensions, DIC payments, and a burial allowance.

  • It takes an average of 158 days to receive claimed benefits. 


Can Your Spouse Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your spouse claim your va pension if you die

You did your duty for their country, and even after you pass away, this honor passes to your spouse in the form of VA benefits

Paul Corbett, a U.S. Marine veteran and public affairs officer at the VA, says:

“The VA helps surviving spouses of veterans cope with financial challenges by providing supplemental income through the survivor's pension benefit program. Payments are made to bring the survivor’s total income, including other retirement or social security income, to a level set by Congress.”

There are three criteria determining whether your spouse can claim your VA pension. You need to meet at least one of them: 

  • You entered active duty before September 7, 1980, and served a minimum of 90 days with one day served in a wartime period.  

  • You entered active duty after September 7, 1980, and served at least 24 months, or your full period of called duty and at least one day served in a wartime period.

  • You were an officer who started active duty after October 16, 1981, with no active duty served 24 months prior. 

Some covered wartime periods include World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War. For your spouse to be eligible, some financial requirements must be met, like a net worth limit. Congress sets the actual pension paid to your spouse, which is known as the maximum annual pension rate (MAPR). 

The VA calculates your spouse’s net worth, which includes income and assets (real estate and personal items like furniture). Education and medical expenses are deducted from the income. If the total income is less than $155,356, your spouse can claim your VA pension because this benefit supports low-income spouses. 

The annual cost of living also determines the amount your spouse is eligible for. This pension is a tax-free benefit.  

Keep track of all your important pension documents by storing them in one secure location like Trustworthy. Trustworthy is a family operating system families across the country use to keep their important documents organized. The easy-to-use collaboration features allow you to share pension details with your spouse. 


Can Your Child Claim Your VA Pension If You Die?

can your child claim your va pension if you die

If you die, your child can also claim your VA pension. However, they must meet some requirements to be eligible for these benefits. 

First, they must be unmarried to qualify. If they’re married, they cannot claim your pension. If your child is unmarried and at least one of the factors below is true, they qualify to claim your VA pension: 

  • They’re under 18 years of age. 

  • They’re under 23 years of age and are attending a VA-approved school/ training institution. 

  • They’re unable to care for themselves because of a disability that happened to them before 18 years of age. 

The income and net worth requirements are also applied to your child’s claim. The MAPR decides the amount paid to your child, which is dependent on how many children you have who will claim your pension.

Store all necessary documents and information, and share them with your child on Trustworthy to alleviate stress.


What VA Benefits Include After Death

The VA offers several survivor benefits your family can access after your death. One is a low-cost group insurance program called Servicemember’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI), which gives veterans peace of mind that their family is taken care of after their death.  

When you pass away, your loved ones are covered by a number of different benefits from survivor programs like the following: 

  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

  • The Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

  • The Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35)

  • A Survivors’ Pension

The DIC is a monthly benefit to your spouse. The VA will provide them with a monthly stipend. This payment is different from the survivor's pension. 

The amount paid will depend on financial needs. For example, a surviving spouse typically receives an average of $1,612 per month. However, if you had a disability relating to your service for at least eight years before your death, this amount is raised by $342 per month. 

This benefit is available to claim by your spouse (even if they remarry) and your child. Your surviving parents can also claim VA benefits after your death. The amount they can claim depends on their income and whether one or both parents are still alive. 

Other VA benefits after death include burial and memorial benefits. Spouses and children can claim an allowance to cover burial and memorial costs, which include expenses for the plot, a headstone, and transportation of the veteran's remains to the gravesite. 

The actual allowance amount will vary depending on the circumstances of your death. For example, if you passed away after October 1, 2023, your spouse or child will receive $948 for the burial and $948 for the gravesite. Headstones are allocated at $231 if you pass away after October 1, 2021. 

The VA also offers grief counseling and transition support to your spouse or child should you pass away while on active duty. 


When VA Benefits Stop After Death

when do va benefits stop after death

It’s important for your spouse and child to know VA benefits may stop after your death, depending on a few circumstances. 

If your spouse remarries after they’re 55 and before they’re 57, DIC benefits will stop. However, the survivor's pension benefit will not stop after death as long as it’s paid to your spouse or child. 

Should either of them no longer qualify for these benefits, they’ll stop. Other benefits, such as the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, stop 20 years after the date of death. 

Keep this information readily available on Trustworthy and give your spouse and child easy access.     

Steps to Receive VA Benefits

So, how does your spouse or child claim these VA benefits, and how long does it take? Before you begin the process, it’s important to note receiving VA benefits takes a while.

File the Claim 

First, your spouse or child will need to file a claim. They can do this online, by mail, fax, or in person at the nearest VA office. They must collect all evidence needed for the claim, which includes VA medical records and supporting statements.

Claim Received Notification 

After the claim is submitted, they’ll receive a notification. Online submissions have instant notifications, and if they submit via mail, the notification could take at least one week. 

The Claim Is Reviewed, and Evidence Is Gathered 

During this stage, there is nothing to do but wait while the VA reviews the claim, reviews the evidence, and gathers its own evidence from various sources.  

Receive the Claim Packet 

Once the decision is made, the claim packet, which includes the details of the decision, is sent through the U.S. mail. This takes 7-10 business days. 

The entire claims process can take an average of 158 days to complete


Frequently Asked Questions

Who will get money after the death of a military veteran?

The money of a military veteran will go to their surviving spouse, child, or eligible family members. 

How much money do you get from VA benefits?

The amount will differ depending on your circumstances, but the average monthly payment is around $1,612 per month. 

What happens to DIC if a spouse remarries?

If the spouse remarries after 55 years old and before 57 years old, the DIC payments will stop.  

Can you get VA compensation if the veteran died from causes unrelated to military service?

No, the veteran must have died while on active duty, inactive duty but in training, or as a result of a service-related disability or condition.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

No credit card required.

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