Estate Planning

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

Joel Lim

April 11, 2024

|

veteran benefit eligibility

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Veterans are eligible for various benefits based on their service history. These benefits honor their service to the country and streamline their transition into civilian life. 

Unfortunately, they’re not always easy to claim. Understanding the causes of denials and exclusions is the first step to ensuring your claim doesn’t land the same fate. We’ll explain basic veteran benefits eligibility requirements, reasons some veterans may not qualify, and steps you can take before submitting your claim to ensure you receive your VA benefits.


Key Takeaways

  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) offers benefits covering healthcare, education, disability, and nearly every facet of life to ensure veterans have the support they need.

  • Eligibility for VA benefits depends on the applicant’s veteran and discharge status, nature of active duty, and the duration of service.

  • Some veterans are denied benefits due to insufficient or inaccurate documentation, dishonorable discharge, and outstanding felonies.


Veteran Benefits Eligibility Requirements

veteran benefits eligibility requirements

The VA administers benefits to veterans and their dependents. These benefits range from monthly stipends for disabled vets and housing assistance to healthcare and education. As a result, eligibility requirements differ widely from one program to another. 

Nonetheless, there are basic VA benefits eligibility requirements veterans must meet across all programs, including:

Veteran Status

To qualify for VA benefits, you must be a veteran or a veteran’s survivor. A veteran, as outlined by statute, is any individual who served in the active military, naval, or air service and received a discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

This might sound obvious, but it’s an important factor to consider during claims. Some civilian groups and members of the National Guard or Reserves often qualify as veterans due to specific criteria in their service. For instance, a member of the National Guard qualifies as a veteran and is eligible for VA benefits if they were enlisted on federal active duty for at least 180 days or served their post for two decades. On the other hand, civilians qualify for the same if they serve as commissioned officers for the military.

Discharge Criteria

Military service discharges come in five categories:

  • Honorable discharge

  • General discharge

  • Undesirable discharge

  • Bad conduct discharge

  • Dishonorable discharge

To qualify for VA benefits, an individual must be discharged from service under conditions other than dishonorable. Veterans discharged under categories other than the last one typically qualify for VA benefits. 

However, only veterans released from service under honorable and general discharges enjoy a smooth sailing claims process. 

Those discharged under undesirable or bad conduct discharge are often subjected to a special “character of service determination” review. During this process, the VA appraises their entire enlistment period to assess the quality of service they delivered and determine whether it’s sufficient to qualify them for benefits.

Length of Active Duty

Before September 8, 1980, anyone who served in the military qualified for VA benefits regardless of how short their stint may have been. However, any individual enlisted after this date must now serve actively for a minimum of 24 months to qualify for benefits and even be considered a veteran. 

The only exception to this requirement is if the individual is disabled as a result of a service-connected endeavor during their service.

Nature of Military Service

The nature of your military service also influences your eligibility for VA benefits. Typically, all military services fall into two categories: wartime and peacetime service.

Wartime service refers to periods of military service during which the U.S. is engaged in a declared conflict specified by Congress. Veterans who served during this period for 90 consecutive days or more are usually eligible for extensive VA benefits, including pension and funeral benefits.

Peacetime military service occurs when the U.S. isn’t engaged in a declared war or conflict. Veterans serving during these periods are also often eligible for benefits, but the scope is typically limited.


Why Do Some Veterans Not Get Benefits?

why do some veterans not get benefits

There are a variety of reasons that some veterans do not get benefits, some of which are preventable. Let’s check out key reasons some veterans do not get benefits:

Insufficient Documentation

Although a veteran is generally any individual who served in the Army, Navy, or Air Force, some members of the National Guard, Reserve, or even the civilian population may sometimes qualify as veterans. 

As a result of these disparities, the VA usually vets anyone applying for benefits to determine if they’re actually a veteran. For this vetting, the VA primarily relies on military department service documents such as:

  • DD Form 214: This provides information about a veteran’s military service, including their dates of service, discharge status, and awards received

  • Medical records: Veterans claiming benefits related to healthcare, for instance, the disability pension, are required to provide medical records as proof of their service-connected disabilities or injuries

  • Dependency documents: Veterans or their survivors claiming dependent benefits such as indemnity compensation need to provide documentation such as birth, marriage, and death certificates to prove dependency

  • Power of attorney (POA) or representative designation: Veterans who wish to hire an attorney or any other individual to act on their behalf in VA matters must usually submit a POA form 

Some veterans or their dependents often fail to provide adequate documentation to prove their claims, resulting in the denial of benefits. For instance, veterans claiming disability pensions are often required to submit their diagnosis records and documents highlighting the functional impact of their disability on their daily activities.

Unfortunately, most veterans claiming disability pensions often submit medical diagnosis records but fail to provide the latter. This usually results in a zero percent disability rating, which translates to non-monetary benefits! 

Missing or Downplaying the C&P Exam

The VA requires veterans seeking disability benefits or pensions to sit for the Compensation and Pension exam. This exam helps prove whether the claimant’s disability or injury is service-connected. Missing this exam often results in a loss of benefits. 

Additionally, even if you do go to your C&P exam, if you play symptoms down, you may not be eligible for certain benefits you’re entitled to.

Willful Misconduct

A veteran’s conduct during enlistment also impacts their eligibility for VA benefits, especially when applying for disability or health benefits. 

If the VA determines that the disability, injury, or health condition you’re claiming benefits for resulted from knowingly engaging in prohibited actions or disregarding their consequences, you will not receive compensation. Examples of willful misconduct include deliberately abusing alcohol or drugs despite being aware of the potential consequences.

Bad or Dishonorable Discharge

Another common reason some veterans don’t get benefits is due to a bad or dishonorable discharge status. Veterans with a bad conduct discharge usually remain eligible for VA healthcare services and non-service-connected pension benefits but may be limited in other benefits. Veterans with a dishonorable discharge on the other hand aren’t automatically disqualified, but they’re generally not eligible for most VA benefits.

Outstanding Felonies

Veterans may have been discharged honorably, but if they have an outstanding felony, they will be automatically disqualified and lose out on benefits.

Claiming When It’s Too Late

Certain VA benefits are time-sensitive, depending on the application stage. For instance, veterans filing their original disability claim are typically required to file within 90-180 days before discharge. While they can always claim after discharge, the post-service claim process is usually complex and lengthy. Even more strict deadlines apply for VA benefit appeals or supplemental claims. Sadly, most veterans are usually unaware of these deadlines, resulting in the denial of benefits.

Familiarize yourself with the VA benefits claim process to ensure you don’t miss out on these deadlines. Also, keep your military paperwork organized and accessible with Trustworthy to ensure the timely submission of your applications, appeals, and other required documentation.

Confusion Over Employment

Certain VA benefits usually feature income and asset limits. For instance, the VA usually imposes income and net-worth limits on pension benefits. 

The department also prohibits employment under the Total Disability Individual Unemployability program. These limits ensure only veterans in dire need of assistance get the aid they need. However, they can lead to confusion, causing some veterans to refrain from claiming benefits. As a consequence, they miss out on potentially life-changing support.  

Lack of Knowledge

The VA offers a long list of benefits veterans can use to address individual issues without touching their monthly compensation.

For instance, under the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) grant, veterans with specific disabilities can qualify for grants that help offset the cost of purchasing a home tailored to accommodate their disability.

The VA also offers the Special Home Adaptation (SHA) grant, which covers the cost of adapting a disabled veteran’s home to suit their needs. Despite the clear perks offered through these programs, most veterans have no idea they exist. In fact, 48% of veterans don’t understand their benefit options, which ultimately ends with them not getting the benefits they deserve.


What Can You Do If You Want to Get VA Benefits?

what can you do if you want to get va benefits

Planning to claim your VA benefits soon? Here are steps you can take to ensure you don’t miss out on your rightful benefits:

Master the Intricacies of the VA Benefits Claims Process

Claiming VA benefits should be a straightforward process, but unfortunately, it’s not. Familiarizing yourself with the various procedures is the key to ensuring you enjoy a seamless claims process. Check out the following resources to master the intricacies of the VA benefits claims process:

  • VA Government: This is the official VA department website. It features articles, step-by-step guides, and all the resources you may need to learn about the VA benefits claims process. You can even find a VA location via the website.

  • eBenefits: This website covers all things VA compensation.

  • IAM Veterans Services Program: It helps veterans with the application process for VA benefits and compensation.

Organize and Secure Your Paperwork

The VA deals with a large number of claims daily. As a result, lacking even a single document or submitting the wrong one can delay your claim for months or deny it altogether. Therefore, if you are a veteran or a dependent of one, ensuring you have all your paperwork in line before submitting a claim is essential.

While physical filing is a good way to keep the documents secure, they remain susceptible to physical damage and loss. Consider using Trustworthy to secure and organize your military service documents. Trustworthy is a digital storage system designed to organize and manage important documents securely.

Furthermore, you can add and control permissions. This allows you control over who has access to what and means you can add your attorney and dependents to your Trustworthy account, ensuring their access to your military service documents for benefit claims even after your passing.

Show Up & Be Truthful at Your C&P Exam

Clay Simms, a US Marine Corps veteran and the creator of TheCivDiv says:

“Do not hold anything back… I always recommend veterans to be open, be honest, and be vulnerable. If you’re asked how you’re doing today, if you’re feeling down, let the examiner know. If you’re depressed, talk about it. This is your chance to tell the VA exactly what is going on in your life.” 

Holding anything back or downplaying symptoms is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Being vulnerable and fully open for just this short period of time can allow you to get all the benefits you deserve.

Get an Attorney to Help You

Whether you’re filing for disability, education, or health claims, one thing is certain: the process is complex and lengthy due to the number of applications the VA has to handle. 

Because of this, you should consider hiring a veteran attorney to help you out. They’re familiar with the intricacies of VA benefits claims and will offer personal attention to your case, ensuring the best outcomes. Also, should your claim be denied, they know just the steps to take to appeal your case successfully. 

So, hiring an attorney to advocate for you is among the best decisions you’ll make when claiming VA benefits. Add them to your Trustworthy account to provide them with seamless access to all your military service documents.


Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

How do I know if I qualify for VA benefits?

If you served in active duty in the military, naval, or air forces and were discharged under honorable conditions, you qualify for VA benefits. However, if you’re unsure of the specific benefits you qualify for, contact your local VA representative or consult an attorney specializing in VA matters.

What should I do if my VA benefits claim is denied?

If you believe your claim was wrongfully denied, you should file for a Notice of Disagreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to initiate the formal appeal process. Use Trustworthy to organize all relevant and additional documents, from medical records to statements from service members, to ensure seamless retrieval should the VA request them. 

Can I receive VA benefits if my income exceeds certain thresholds?

Yes. Although some VA benefits, such as need-based pensions, are subject to income and asset limits, most don’t have strict income requirements. 

For instance, regardless of income level, healthcare and education benefits are usually available to veterans. Ultimately, whether or not you receive the benefits depends on the VA benefits program in question.

How long does it take to receive VA benefits after filing a claim?

It depends on the type of benefit you’re applying for, the complexity of your claim, and the current workload at the VA office handling your claim. However, the average time is 158 days.

Do I need a disability advocate to apply for VA benefits?

No, a disability advocate is not a prerequisite when applying for VA benefits. However, hiring one may be a good idea, as they are trained and experienced in navigating the VA benefits system and will help you understand all the benefits you’re eligible for to maximize your support. 

What types of documentation do I need to support my VA benefits claim?

Common documentation needed for VA benefits claims includes the DD Form 214 or an equivalent for National Guard or Reserve service. You also need medical evaluations, diagnosis and treatment plans, service treatment records, and financial paperwork like bank statements and tax returns. 

If you’re applying for your dependents, you may need to provide marriage, birth, or adoption certificates. Dependents applying for a deceased veteran’s benefits are required to submit a death certificate. Use Trustworthy to ensure all these documents are well-organized and easily accessed.

Estate Planning

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

Joel Lim

April 11, 2024

|

veteran benefit eligibility

Veterans are eligible for various benefits based on their service history. These benefits honor their service to the country and streamline their transition into civilian life. 

Unfortunately, they’re not always easy to claim. Understanding the causes of denials and exclusions is the first step to ensuring your claim doesn’t land the same fate. We’ll explain basic veteran benefits eligibility requirements, reasons some veterans may not qualify, and steps you can take before submitting your claim to ensure you receive your VA benefits.


Key Takeaways

  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) offers benefits covering healthcare, education, disability, and nearly every facet of life to ensure veterans have the support they need.

  • Eligibility for VA benefits depends on the applicant’s veteran and discharge status, nature of active duty, and the duration of service.

  • Some veterans are denied benefits due to insufficient or inaccurate documentation, dishonorable discharge, and outstanding felonies.


Veteran Benefits Eligibility Requirements

veteran benefits eligibility requirements

The VA administers benefits to veterans and their dependents. These benefits range from monthly stipends for disabled vets and housing assistance to healthcare and education. As a result, eligibility requirements differ widely from one program to another. 

Nonetheless, there are basic VA benefits eligibility requirements veterans must meet across all programs, including:

Veteran Status

To qualify for VA benefits, you must be a veteran or a veteran’s survivor. A veteran, as outlined by statute, is any individual who served in the active military, naval, or air service and received a discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

This might sound obvious, but it’s an important factor to consider during claims. Some civilian groups and members of the National Guard or Reserves often qualify as veterans due to specific criteria in their service. For instance, a member of the National Guard qualifies as a veteran and is eligible for VA benefits if they were enlisted on federal active duty for at least 180 days or served their post for two decades. On the other hand, civilians qualify for the same if they serve as commissioned officers for the military.

Discharge Criteria

Military service discharges come in five categories:

  • Honorable discharge

  • General discharge

  • Undesirable discharge

  • Bad conduct discharge

  • Dishonorable discharge

To qualify for VA benefits, an individual must be discharged from service under conditions other than dishonorable. Veterans discharged under categories other than the last one typically qualify for VA benefits. 

However, only veterans released from service under honorable and general discharges enjoy a smooth sailing claims process. 

Those discharged under undesirable or bad conduct discharge are often subjected to a special “character of service determination” review. During this process, the VA appraises their entire enlistment period to assess the quality of service they delivered and determine whether it’s sufficient to qualify them for benefits.

Length of Active Duty

Before September 8, 1980, anyone who served in the military qualified for VA benefits regardless of how short their stint may have been. However, any individual enlisted after this date must now serve actively for a minimum of 24 months to qualify for benefits and even be considered a veteran. 

The only exception to this requirement is if the individual is disabled as a result of a service-connected endeavor during their service.

Nature of Military Service

The nature of your military service also influences your eligibility for VA benefits. Typically, all military services fall into two categories: wartime and peacetime service.

Wartime service refers to periods of military service during which the U.S. is engaged in a declared conflict specified by Congress. Veterans who served during this period for 90 consecutive days or more are usually eligible for extensive VA benefits, including pension and funeral benefits.

Peacetime military service occurs when the U.S. isn’t engaged in a declared war or conflict. Veterans serving during these periods are also often eligible for benefits, but the scope is typically limited.


Why Do Some Veterans Not Get Benefits?

why do some veterans not get benefits

There are a variety of reasons that some veterans do not get benefits, some of which are preventable. Let’s check out key reasons some veterans do not get benefits:

Insufficient Documentation

Although a veteran is generally any individual who served in the Army, Navy, or Air Force, some members of the National Guard, Reserve, or even the civilian population may sometimes qualify as veterans. 

As a result of these disparities, the VA usually vets anyone applying for benefits to determine if they’re actually a veteran. For this vetting, the VA primarily relies on military department service documents such as:

  • DD Form 214: This provides information about a veteran’s military service, including their dates of service, discharge status, and awards received

  • Medical records: Veterans claiming benefits related to healthcare, for instance, the disability pension, are required to provide medical records as proof of their service-connected disabilities or injuries

  • Dependency documents: Veterans or their survivors claiming dependent benefits such as indemnity compensation need to provide documentation such as birth, marriage, and death certificates to prove dependency

  • Power of attorney (POA) or representative designation: Veterans who wish to hire an attorney or any other individual to act on their behalf in VA matters must usually submit a POA form 

Some veterans or their dependents often fail to provide adequate documentation to prove their claims, resulting in the denial of benefits. For instance, veterans claiming disability pensions are often required to submit their diagnosis records and documents highlighting the functional impact of their disability on their daily activities.

Unfortunately, most veterans claiming disability pensions often submit medical diagnosis records but fail to provide the latter. This usually results in a zero percent disability rating, which translates to non-monetary benefits! 

Missing or Downplaying the C&P Exam

The VA requires veterans seeking disability benefits or pensions to sit for the Compensation and Pension exam. This exam helps prove whether the claimant’s disability or injury is service-connected. Missing this exam often results in a loss of benefits. 

Additionally, even if you do go to your C&P exam, if you play symptoms down, you may not be eligible for certain benefits you’re entitled to.

Willful Misconduct

A veteran’s conduct during enlistment also impacts their eligibility for VA benefits, especially when applying for disability or health benefits. 

If the VA determines that the disability, injury, or health condition you’re claiming benefits for resulted from knowingly engaging in prohibited actions or disregarding their consequences, you will not receive compensation. Examples of willful misconduct include deliberately abusing alcohol or drugs despite being aware of the potential consequences.

Bad or Dishonorable Discharge

Another common reason some veterans don’t get benefits is due to a bad or dishonorable discharge status. Veterans with a bad conduct discharge usually remain eligible for VA healthcare services and non-service-connected pension benefits but may be limited in other benefits. Veterans with a dishonorable discharge on the other hand aren’t automatically disqualified, but they’re generally not eligible for most VA benefits.

Outstanding Felonies

Veterans may have been discharged honorably, but if they have an outstanding felony, they will be automatically disqualified and lose out on benefits.

Claiming When It’s Too Late

Certain VA benefits are time-sensitive, depending on the application stage. For instance, veterans filing their original disability claim are typically required to file within 90-180 days before discharge. While they can always claim after discharge, the post-service claim process is usually complex and lengthy. Even more strict deadlines apply for VA benefit appeals or supplemental claims. Sadly, most veterans are usually unaware of these deadlines, resulting in the denial of benefits.

Familiarize yourself with the VA benefits claim process to ensure you don’t miss out on these deadlines. Also, keep your military paperwork organized and accessible with Trustworthy to ensure the timely submission of your applications, appeals, and other required documentation.

Confusion Over Employment

Certain VA benefits usually feature income and asset limits. For instance, the VA usually imposes income and net-worth limits on pension benefits. 

The department also prohibits employment under the Total Disability Individual Unemployability program. These limits ensure only veterans in dire need of assistance get the aid they need. However, they can lead to confusion, causing some veterans to refrain from claiming benefits. As a consequence, they miss out on potentially life-changing support.  

Lack of Knowledge

The VA offers a long list of benefits veterans can use to address individual issues without touching their monthly compensation.

For instance, under the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) grant, veterans with specific disabilities can qualify for grants that help offset the cost of purchasing a home tailored to accommodate their disability.

The VA also offers the Special Home Adaptation (SHA) grant, which covers the cost of adapting a disabled veteran’s home to suit their needs. Despite the clear perks offered through these programs, most veterans have no idea they exist. In fact, 48% of veterans don’t understand their benefit options, which ultimately ends with them not getting the benefits they deserve.


What Can You Do If You Want to Get VA Benefits?

what can you do if you want to get va benefits

Planning to claim your VA benefits soon? Here are steps you can take to ensure you don’t miss out on your rightful benefits:

Master the Intricacies of the VA Benefits Claims Process

Claiming VA benefits should be a straightforward process, but unfortunately, it’s not. Familiarizing yourself with the various procedures is the key to ensuring you enjoy a seamless claims process. Check out the following resources to master the intricacies of the VA benefits claims process:

  • VA Government: This is the official VA department website. It features articles, step-by-step guides, and all the resources you may need to learn about the VA benefits claims process. You can even find a VA location via the website.

  • eBenefits: This website covers all things VA compensation.

  • IAM Veterans Services Program: It helps veterans with the application process for VA benefits and compensation.

Organize and Secure Your Paperwork

The VA deals with a large number of claims daily. As a result, lacking even a single document or submitting the wrong one can delay your claim for months or deny it altogether. Therefore, if you are a veteran or a dependent of one, ensuring you have all your paperwork in line before submitting a claim is essential.

While physical filing is a good way to keep the documents secure, they remain susceptible to physical damage and loss. Consider using Trustworthy to secure and organize your military service documents. Trustworthy is a digital storage system designed to organize and manage important documents securely.

Furthermore, you can add and control permissions. This allows you control over who has access to what and means you can add your attorney and dependents to your Trustworthy account, ensuring their access to your military service documents for benefit claims even after your passing.

Show Up & Be Truthful at Your C&P Exam

Clay Simms, a US Marine Corps veteran and the creator of TheCivDiv says:

“Do not hold anything back… I always recommend veterans to be open, be honest, and be vulnerable. If you’re asked how you’re doing today, if you’re feeling down, let the examiner know. If you’re depressed, talk about it. This is your chance to tell the VA exactly what is going on in your life.” 

Holding anything back or downplaying symptoms is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Being vulnerable and fully open for just this short period of time can allow you to get all the benefits you deserve.

Get an Attorney to Help You

Whether you’re filing for disability, education, or health claims, one thing is certain: the process is complex and lengthy due to the number of applications the VA has to handle. 

Because of this, you should consider hiring a veteran attorney to help you out. They’re familiar with the intricacies of VA benefits claims and will offer personal attention to your case, ensuring the best outcomes. Also, should your claim be denied, they know just the steps to take to appeal your case successfully. 

So, hiring an attorney to advocate for you is among the best decisions you’ll make when claiming VA benefits. Add them to your Trustworthy account to provide them with seamless access to all your military service documents.


Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

How do I know if I qualify for VA benefits?

If you served in active duty in the military, naval, or air forces and were discharged under honorable conditions, you qualify for VA benefits. However, if you’re unsure of the specific benefits you qualify for, contact your local VA representative or consult an attorney specializing in VA matters.

What should I do if my VA benefits claim is denied?

If you believe your claim was wrongfully denied, you should file for a Notice of Disagreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to initiate the formal appeal process. Use Trustworthy to organize all relevant and additional documents, from medical records to statements from service members, to ensure seamless retrieval should the VA request them. 

Can I receive VA benefits if my income exceeds certain thresholds?

Yes. Although some VA benefits, such as need-based pensions, are subject to income and asset limits, most don’t have strict income requirements. 

For instance, regardless of income level, healthcare and education benefits are usually available to veterans. Ultimately, whether or not you receive the benefits depends on the VA benefits program in question.

How long does it take to receive VA benefits after filing a claim?

It depends on the type of benefit you’re applying for, the complexity of your claim, and the current workload at the VA office handling your claim. However, the average time is 158 days.

Do I need a disability advocate to apply for VA benefits?

No, a disability advocate is not a prerequisite when applying for VA benefits. However, hiring one may be a good idea, as they are trained and experienced in navigating the VA benefits system and will help you understand all the benefits you’re eligible for to maximize your support. 

What types of documentation do I need to support my VA benefits claim?

Common documentation needed for VA benefits claims includes the DD Form 214 or an equivalent for National Guard or Reserve service. You also need medical evaluations, diagnosis and treatment plans, service treatment records, and financial paperwork like bank statements and tax returns. 

If you’re applying for your dependents, you may need to provide marriage, birth, or adoption certificates. Dependents applying for a deceased veteran’s benefits are required to submit a death certificate. Use Trustworthy to ensure all these documents are well-organized and easily accessed.

Estate Planning

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

Joel Lim

April 11, 2024

|

veteran benefit eligibility

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Veterans are eligible for various benefits based on their service history. These benefits honor their service to the country and streamline their transition into civilian life. 

Unfortunately, they’re not always easy to claim. Understanding the causes of denials and exclusions is the first step to ensuring your claim doesn’t land the same fate. We’ll explain basic veteran benefits eligibility requirements, reasons some veterans may not qualify, and steps you can take before submitting your claim to ensure you receive your VA benefits.


Key Takeaways

  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) offers benefits covering healthcare, education, disability, and nearly every facet of life to ensure veterans have the support they need.

  • Eligibility for VA benefits depends on the applicant’s veteran and discharge status, nature of active duty, and the duration of service.

  • Some veterans are denied benefits due to insufficient or inaccurate documentation, dishonorable discharge, and outstanding felonies.


Veteran Benefits Eligibility Requirements

veteran benefits eligibility requirements

The VA administers benefits to veterans and their dependents. These benefits range from monthly stipends for disabled vets and housing assistance to healthcare and education. As a result, eligibility requirements differ widely from one program to another. 

Nonetheless, there are basic VA benefits eligibility requirements veterans must meet across all programs, including:

Veteran Status

To qualify for VA benefits, you must be a veteran or a veteran’s survivor. A veteran, as outlined by statute, is any individual who served in the active military, naval, or air service and received a discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

This might sound obvious, but it’s an important factor to consider during claims. Some civilian groups and members of the National Guard or Reserves often qualify as veterans due to specific criteria in their service. For instance, a member of the National Guard qualifies as a veteran and is eligible for VA benefits if they were enlisted on federal active duty for at least 180 days or served their post for two decades. On the other hand, civilians qualify for the same if they serve as commissioned officers for the military.

Discharge Criteria

Military service discharges come in five categories:

  • Honorable discharge

  • General discharge

  • Undesirable discharge

  • Bad conduct discharge

  • Dishonorable discharge

To qualify for VA benefits, an individual must be discharged from service under conditions other than dishonorable. Veterans discharged under categories other than the last one typically qualify for VA benefits. 

However, only veterans released from service under honorable and general discharges enjoy a smooth sailing claims process. 

Those discharged under undesirable or bad conduct discharge are often subjected to a special “character of service determination” review. During this process, the VA appraises their entire enlistment period to assess the quality of service they delivered and determine whether it’s sufficient to qualify them for benefits.

Length of Active Duty

Before September 8, 1980, anyone who served in the military qualified for VA benefits regardless of how short their stint may have been. However, any individual enlisted after this date must now serve actively for a minimum of 24 months to qualify for benefits and even be considered a veteran. 

The only exception to this requirement is if the individual is disabled as a result of a service-connected endeavor during their service.

Nature of Military Service

The nature of your military service also influences your eligibility for VA benefits. Typically, all military services fall into two categories: wartime and peacetime service.

Wartime service refers to periods of military service during which the U.S. is engaged in a declared conflict specified by Congress. Veterans who served during this period for 90 consecutive days or more are usually eligible for extensive VA benefits, including pension and funeral benefits.

Peacetime military service occurs when the U.S. isn’t engaged in a declared war or conflict. Veterans serving during these periods are also often eligible for benefits, but the scope is typically limited.


Why Do Some Veterans Not Get Benefits?

why do some veterans not get benefits

There are a variety of reasons that some veterans do not get benefits, some of which are preventable. Let’s check out key reasons some veterans do not get benefits:

Insufficient Documentation

Although a veteran is generally any individual who served in the Army, Navy, or Air Force, some members of the National Guard, Reserve, or even the civilian population may sometimes qualify as veterans. 

As a result of these disparities, the VA usually vets anyone applying for benefits to determine if they’re actually a veteran. For this vetting, the VA primarily relies on military department service documents such as:

  • DD Form 214: This provides information about a veteran’s military service, including their dates of service, discharge status, and awards received

  • Medical records: Veterans claiming benefits related to healthcare, for instance, the disability pension, are required to provide medical records as proof of their service-connected disabilities or injuries

  • Dependency documents: Veterans or their survivors claiming dependent benefits such as indemnity compensation need to provide documentation such as birth, marriage, and death certificates to prove dependency

  • Power of attorney (POA) or representative designation: Veterans who wish to hire an attorney or any other individual to act on their behalf in VA matters must usually submit a POA form 

Some veterans or their dependents often fail to provide adequate documentation to prove their claims, resulting in the denial of benefits. For instance, veterans claiming disability pensions are often required to submit their diagnosis records and documents highlighting the functional impact of their disability on their daily activities.

Unfortunately, most veterans claiming disability pensions often submit medical diagnosis records but fail to provide the latter. This usually results in a zero percent disability rating, which translates to non-monetary benefits! 

Missing or Downplaying the C&P Exam

The VA requires veterans seeking disability benefits or pensions to sit for the Compensation and Pension exam. This exam helps prove whether the claimant’s disability or injury is service-connected. Missing this exam often results in a loss of benefits. 

Additionally, even if you do go to your C&P exam, if you play symptoms down, you may not be eligible for certain benefits you’re entitled to.

Willful Misconduct

A veteran’s conduct during enlistment also impacts their eligibility for VA benefits, especially when applying for disability or health benefits. 

If the VA determines that the disability, injury, or health condition you’re claiming benefits for resulted from knowingly engaging in prohibited actions or disregarding their consequences, you will not receive compensation. Examples of willful misconduct include deliberately abusing alcohol or drugs despite being aware of the potential consequences.

Bad or Dishonorable Discharge

Another common reason some veterans don’t get benefits is due to a bad or dishonorable discharge status. Veterans with a bad conduct discharge usually remain eligible for VA healthcare services and non-service-connected pension benefits but may be limited in other benefits. Veterans with a dishonorable discharge on the other hand aren’t automatically disqualified, but they’re generally not eligible for most VA benefits.

Outstanding Felonies

Veterans may have been discharged honorably, but if they have an outstanding felony, they will be automatically disqualified and lose out on benefits.

Claiming When It’s Too Late

Certain VA benefits are time-sensitive, depending on the application stage. For instance, veterans filing their original disability claim are typically required to file within 90-180 days before discharge. While they can always claim after discharge, the post-service claim process is usually complex and lengthy. Even more strict deadlines apply for VA benefit appeals or supplemental claims. Sadly, most veterans are usually unaware of these deadlines, resulting in the denial of benefits.

Familiarize yourself with the VA benefits claim process to ensure you don’t miss out on these deadlines. Also, keep your military paperwork organized and accessible with Trustworthy to ensure the timely submission of your applications, appeals, and other required documentation.

Confusion Over Employment

Certain VA benefits usually feature income and asset limits. For instance, the VA usually imposes income and net-worth limits on pension benefits. 

The department also prohibits employment under the Total Disability Individual Unemployability program. These limits ensure only veterans in dire need of assistance get the aid they need. However, they can lead to confusion, causing some veterans to refrain from claiming benefits. As a consequence, they miss out on potentially life-changing support.  

Lack of Knowledge

The VA offers a long list of benefits veterans can use to address individual issues without touching their monthly compensation.

For instance, under the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) grant, veterans with specific disabilities can qualify for grants that help offset the cost of purchasing a home tailored to accommodate their disability.

The VA also offers the Special Home Adaptation (SHA) grant, which covers the cost of adapting a disabled veteran’s home to suit their needs. Despite the clear perks offered through these programs, most veterans have no idea they exist. In fact, 48% of veterans don’t understand their benefit options, which ultimately ends with them not getting the benefits they deserve.


What Can You Do If You Want to Get VA Benefits?

what can you do if you want to get va benefits

Planning to claim your VA benefits soon? Here are steps you can take to ensure you don’t miss out on your rightful benefits:

Master the Intricacies of the VA Benefits Claims Process

Claiming VA benefits should be a straightforward process, but unfortunately, it’s not. Familiarizing yourself with the various procedures is the key to ensuring you enjoy a seamless claims process. Check out the following resources to master the intricacies of the VA benefits claims process:

  • VA Government: This is the official VA department website. It features articles, step-by-step guides, and all the resources you may need to learn about the VA benefits claims process. You can even find a VA location via the website.

  • eBenefits: This website covers all things VA compensation.

  • IAM Veterans Services Program: It helps veterans with the application process for VA benefits and compensation.

Organize and Secure Your Paperwork

The VA deals with a large number of claims daily. As a result, lacking even a single document or submitting the wrong one can delay your claim for months or deny it altogether. Therefore, if you are a veteran or a dependent of one, ensuring you have all your paperwork in line before submitting a claim is essential.

While physical filing is a good way to keep the documents secure, they remain susceptible to physical damage and loss. Consider using Trustworthy to secure and organize your military service documents. Trustworthy is a digital storage system designed to organize and manage important documents securely.

Furthermore, you can add and control permissions. This allows you control over who has access to what and means you can add your attorney and dependents to your Trustworthy account, ensuring their access to your military service documents for benefit claims even after your passing.

Show Up & Be Truthful at Your C&P Exam

Clay Simms, a US Marine Corps veteran and the creator of TheCivDiv says:

“Do not hold anything back… I always recommend veterans to be open, be honest, and be vulnerable. If you’re asked how you’re doing today, if you’re feeling down, let the examiner know. If you’re depressed, talk about it. This is your chance to tell the VA exactly what is going on in your life.” 

Holding anything back or downplaying symptoms is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Being vulnerable and fully open for just this short period of time can allow you to get all the benefits you deserve.

Get an Attorney to Help You

Whether you’re filing for disability, education, or health claims, one thing is certain: the process is complex and lengthy due to the number of applications the VA has to handle. 

Because of this, you should consider hiring a veteran attorney to help you out. They’re familiar with the intricacies of VA benefits claims and will offer personal attention to your case, ensuring the best outcomes. Also, should your claim be denied, they know just the steps to take to appeal your case successfully. 

So, hiring an attorney to advocate for you is among the best decisions you’ll make when claiming VA benefits. Add them to your Trustworthy account to provide them with seamless access to all your military service documents.


Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

How do I know if I qualify for VA benefits?

If you served in active duty in the military, naval, or air forces and were discharged under honorable conditions, you qualify for VA benefits. However, if you’re unsure of the specific benefits you qualify for, contact your local VA representative or consult an attorney specializing in VA matters.

What should I do if my VA benefits claim is denied?

If you believe your claim was wrongfully denied, you should file for a Notice of Disagreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to initiate the formal appeal process. Use Trustworthy to organize all relevant and additional documents, from medical records to statements from service members, to ensure seamless retrieval should the VA request them. 

Can I receive VA benefits if my income exceeds certain thresholds?

Yes. Although some VA benefits, such as need-based pensions, are subject to income and asset limits, most don’t have strict income requirements. 

For instance, regardless of income level, healthcare and education benefits are usually available to veterans. Ultimately, whether or not you receive the benefits depends on the VA benefits program in question.

How long does it take to receive VA benefits after filing a claim?

It depends on the type of benefit you’re applying for, the complexity of your claim, and the current workload at the VA office handling your claim. However, the average time is 158 days.

Do I need a disability advocate to apply for VA benefits?

No, a disability advocate is not a prerequisite when applying for VA benefits. However, hiring one may be a good idea, as they are trained and experienced in navigating the VA benefits system and will help you understand all the benefits you’re eligible for to maximize your support. 

What types of documentation do I need to support my VA benefits claim?

Common documentation needed for VA benefits claims includes the DD Form 214 or an equivalent for National Guard or Reserve service. You also need medical evaluations, diagnosis and treatment plans, service treatment records, and financial paperwork like bank statements and tax returns. 

If you’re applying for your dependents, you may need to provide marriage, birth, or adoption certificates. Dependents applying for a deceased veteran’s benefits are required to submit a death certificate. Use Trustworthy to ensure all these documents are well-organized and easily accessed.

Estate Planning

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

Joel Lim

April 11, 2024

|

veteran benefit eligibility

The intelligent digital vault for families

Trustworthy protects and optimizes important family information so you can save time, money, and enjoy peace of mind

Veterans are eligible for various benefits based on their service history. These benefits honor their service to the country and streamline their transition into civilian life. 

Unfortunately, they’re not always easy to claim. Understanding the causes of denials and exclusions is the first step to ensuring your claim doesn’t land the same fate. We’ll explain basic veteran benefits eligibility requirements, reasons some veterans may not qualify, and steps you can take before submitting your claim to ensure you receive your VA benefits.


Key Takeaways

  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) offers benefits covering healthcare, education, disability, and nearly every facet of life to ensure veterans have the support they need.

  • Eligibility for VA benefits depends on the applicant’s veteran and discharge status, nature of active duty, and the duration of service.

  • Some veterans are denied benefits due to insufficient or inaccurate documentation, dishonorable discharge, and outstanding felonies.


Veteran Benefits Eligibility Requirements

veteran benefits eligibility requirements

The VA administers benefits to veterans and their dependents. These benefits range from monthly stipends for disabled vets and housing assistance to healthcare and education. As a result, eligibility requirements differ widely from one program to another. 

Nonetheless, there are basic VA benefits eligibility requirements veterans must meet across all programs, including:

Veteran Status

To qualify for VA benefits, you must be a veteran or a veteran’s survivor. A veteran, as outlined by statute, is any individual who served in the active military, naval, or air service and received a discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

This might sound obvious, but it’s an important factor to consider during claims. Some civilian groups and members of the National Guard or Reserves often qualify as veterans due to specific criteria in their service. For instance, a member of the National Guard qualifies as a veteran and is eligible for VA benefits if they were enlisted on federal active duty for at least 180 days or served their post for two decades. On the other hand, civilians qualify for the same if they serve as commissioned officers for the military.

Discharge Criteria

Military service discharges come in five categories:

  • Honorable discharge

  • General discharge

  • Undesirable discharge

  • Bad conduct discharge

  • Dishonorable discharge

To qualify for VA benefits, an individual must be discharged from service under conditions other than dishonorable. Veterans discharged under categories other than the last one typically qualify for VA benefits. 

However, only veterans released from service under honorable and general discharges enjoy a smooth sailing claims process. 

Those discharged under undesirable or bad conduct discharge are often subjected to a special “character of service determination” review. During this process, the VA appraises their entire enlistment period to assess the quality of service they delivered and determine whether it’s sufficient to qualify them for benefits.

Length of Active Duty

Before September 8, 1980, anyone who served in the military qualified for VA benefits regardless of how short their stint may have been. However, any individual enlisted after this date must now serve actively for a minimum of 24 months to qualify for benefits and even be considered a veteran. 

The only exception to this requirement is if the individual is disabled as a result of a service-connected endeavor during their service.

Nature of Military Service

The nature of your military service also influences your eligibility for VA benefits. Typically, all military services fall into two categories: wartime and peacetime service.

Wartime service refers to periods of military service during which the U.S. is engaged in a declared conflict specified by Congress. Veterans who served during this period for 90 consecutive days or more are usually eligible for extensive VA benefits, including pension and funeral benefits.

Peacetime military service occurs when the U.S. isn’t engaged in a declared war or conflict. Veterans serving during these periods are also often eligible for benefits, but the scope is typically limited.


Why Do Some Veterans Not Get Benefits?

why do some veterans not get benefits

There are a variety of reasons that some veterans do not get benefits, some of which are preventable. Let’s check out key reasons some veterans do not get benefits:

Insufficient Documentation

Although a veteran is generally any individual who served in the Army, Navy, or Air Force, some members of the National Guard, Reserve, or even the civilian population may sometimes qualify as veterans. 

As a result of these disparities, the VA usually vets anyone applying for benefits to determine if they’re actually a veteran. For this vetting, the VA primarily relies on military department service documents such as:

  • DD Form 214: This provides information about a veteran’s military service, including their dates of service, discharge status, and awards received

  • Medical records: Veterans claiming benefits related to healthcare, for instance, the disability pension, are required to provide medical records as proof of their service-connected disabilities or injuries

  • Dependency documents: Veterans or their survivors claiming dependent benefits such as indemnity compensation need to provide documentation such as birth, marriage, and death certificates to prove dependency

  • Power of attorney (POA) or representative designation: Veterans who wish to hire an attorney or any other individual to act on their behalf in VA matters must usually submit a POA form 

Some veterans or their dependents often fail to provide adequate documentation to prove their claims, resulting in the denial of benefits. For instance, veterans claiming disability pensions are often required to submit their diagnosis records and documents highlighting the functional impact of their disability on their daily activities.

Unfortunately, most veterans claiming disability pensions often submit medical diagnosis records but fail to provide the latter. This usually results in a zero percent disability rating, which translates to non-monetary benefits! 

Missing or Downplaying the C&P Exam

The VA requires veterans seeking disability benefits or pensions to sit for the Compensation and Pension exam. This exam helps prove whether the claimant’s disability or injury is service-connected. Missing this exam often results in a loss of benefits. 

Additionally, even if you do go to your C&P exam, if you play symptoms down, you may not be eligible for certain benefits you’re entitled to.

Willful Misconduct

A veteran’s conduct during enlistment also impacts their eligibility for VA benefits, especially when applying for disability or health benefits. 

If the VA determines that the disability, injury, or health condition you’re claiming benefits for resulted from knowingly engaging in prohibited actions or disregarding their consequences, you will not receive compensation. Examples of willful misconduct include deliberately abusing alcohol or drugs despite being aware of the potential consequences.

Bad or Dishonorable Discharge

Another common reason some veterans don’t get benefits is due to a bad or dishonorable discharge status. Veterans with a bad conduct discharge usually remain eligible for VA healthcare services and non-service-connected pension benefits but may be limited in other benefits. Veterans with a dishonorable discharge on the other hand aren’t automatically disqualified, but they’re generally not eligible for most VA benefits.

Outstanding Felonies

Veterans may have been discharged honorably, but if they have an outstanding felony, they will be automatically disqualified and lose out on benefits.

Claiming When It’s Too Late

Certain VA benefits are time-sensitive, depending on the application stage. For instance, veterans filing their original disability claim are typically required to file within 90-180 days before discharge. While they can always claim after discharge, the post-service claim process is usually complex and lengthy. Even more strict deadlines apply for VA benefit appeals or supplemental claims. Sadly, most veterans are usually unaware of these deadlines, resulting in the denial of benefits.

Familiarize yourself with the VA benefits claim process to ensure you don’t miss out on these deadlines. Also, keep your military paperwork organized and accessible with Trustworthy to ensure the timely submission of your applications, appeals, and other required documentation.

Confusion Over Employment

Certain VA benefits usually feature income and asset limits. For instance, the VA usually imposes income and net-worth limits on pension benefits. 

The department also prohibits employment under the Total Disability Individual Unemployability program. These limits ensure only veterans in dire need of assistance get the aid they need. However, they can lead to confusion, causing some veterans to refrain from claiming benefits. As a consequence, they miss out on potentially life-changing support.  

Lack of Knowledge

The VA offers a long list of benefits veterans can use to address individual issues without touching their monthly compensation.

For instance, under the Specially Adapted Housing (SAH) grant, veterans with specific disabilities can qualify for grants that help offset the cost of purchasing a home tailored to accommodate their disability.

The VA also offers the Special Home Adaptation (SHA) grant, which covers the cost of adapting a disabled veteran’s home to suit their needs. Despite the clear perks offered through these programs, most veterans have no idea they exist. In fact, 48% of veterans don’t understand their benefit options, which ultimately ends with them not getting the benefits they deserve.


What Can You Do If You Want to Get VA Benefits?

what can you do if you want to get va benefits

Planning to claim your VA benefits soon? Here are steps you can take to ensure you don’t miss out on your rightful benefits:

Master the Intricacies of the VA Benefits Claims Process

Claiming VA benefits should be a straightforward process, but unfortunately, it’s not. Familiarizing yourself with the various procedures is the key to ensuring you enjoy a seamless claims process. Check out the following resources to master the intricacies of the VA benefits claims process:

  • VA Government: This is the official VA department website. It features articles, step-by-step guides, and all the resources you may need to learn about the VA benefits claims process. You can even find a VA location via the website.

  • eBenefits: This website covers all things VA compensation.

  • IAM Veterans Services Program: It helps veterans with the application process for VA benefits and compensation.

Organize and Secure Your Paperwork

The VA deals with a large number of claims daily. As a result, lacking even a single document or submitting the wrong one can delay your claim for months or deny it altogether. Therefore, if you are a veteran or a dependent of one, ensuring you have all your paperwork in line before submitting a claim is essential.

While physical filing is a good way to keep the documents secure, they remain susceptible to physical damage and loss. Consider using Trustworthy to secure and organize your military service documents. Trustworthy is a digital storage system designed to organize and manage important documents securely.

Furthermore, you can add and control permissions. This allows you control over who has access to what and means you can add your attorney and dependents to your Trustworthy account, ensuring their access to your military service documents for benefit claims even after your passing.

Show Up & Be Truthful at Your C&P Exam

Clay Simms, a US Marine Corps veteran and the creator of TheCivDiv says:

“Do not hold anything back… I always recommend veterans to be open, be honest, and be vulnerable. If you’re asked how you’re doing today, if you’re feeling down, let the examiner know. If you’re depressed, talk about it. This is your chance to tell the VA exactly what is going on in your life.” 

Holding anything back or downplaying symptoms is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Being vulnerable and fully open for just this short period of time can allow you to get all the benefits you deserve.

Get an Attorney to Help You

Whether you’re filing for disability, education, or health claims, one thing is certain: the process is complex and lengthy due to the number of applications the VA has to handle. 

Because of this, you should consider hiring a veteran attorney to help you out. They’re familiar with the intricacies of VA benefits claims and will offer personal attention to your case, ensuring the best outcomes. Also, should your claim be denied, they know just the steps to take to appeal your case successfully. 

So, hiring an attorney to advocate for you is among the best decisions you’ll make when claiming VA benefits. Add them to your Trustworthy account to provide them with seamless access to all your military service documents.


Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

How do I know if I qualify for VA benefits?

If you served in active duty in the military, naval, or air forces and were discharged under honorable conditions, you qualify for VA benefits. However, if you’re unsure of the specific benefits you qualify for, contact your local VA representative or consult an attorney specializing in VA matters.

What should I do if my VA benefits claim is denied?

If you believe your claim was wrongfully denied, you should file for a Notice of Disagreement with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to initiate the formal appeal process. Use Trustworthy to organize all relevant and additional documents, from medical records to statements from service members, to ensure seamless retrieval should the VA request them. 

Can I receive VA benefits if my income exceeds certain thresholds?

Yes. Although some VA benefits, such as need-based pensions, are subject to income and asset limits, most don’t have strict income requirements. 

For instance, regardless of income level, healthcare and education benefits are usually available to veterans. Ultimately, whether or not you receive the benefits depends on the VA benefits program in question.

How long does it take to receive VA benefits after filing a claim?

It depends on the type of benefit you’re applying for, the complexity of your claim, and the current workload at the VA office handling your claim. However, the average time is 158 days.

Do I need a disability advocate to apply for VA benefits?

No, a disability advocate is not a prerequisite when applying for VA benefits. However, hiring one may be a good idea, as they are trained and experienced in navigating the VA benefits system and will help you understand all the benefits you’re eligible for to maximize your support. 

What types of documentation do I need to support my VA benefits claim?

Common documentation needed for VA benefits claims includes the DD Form 214 or an equivalent for National Guard or Reserve service. You also need medical evaluations, diagnosis and treatment plans, service treatment records, and financial paperwork like bank statements and tax returns. 

If you’re applying for your dependents, you may need to provide marriage, birth, or adoption certificates. Dependents applying for a deceased veteran’s benefits are required to submit a death certificate. Use Trustworthy to ensure all these documents are well-organized and easily accessed.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try Trustworthy today.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

Try the Family Operating System® for yourself. You (and your family) will love it.

No credit card required.

No credit card required.

Related Articles

power of attorney vs will
power of attorney vs will
power of attorney vs will
power of attorney vs will

May 15, 2024

May 15, 2024

Power of Attorney vs. Will: Understanding the Legal Authority

Power of Attorney vs. Will: Understanding the Legal Authority

executor fees
executor fees
executor fees
executor fees

May 15, 2024

May 15, 2024

Executor Fees: What Percentage of an Estate Is Typical?

Executor Fees: What Percentage of an Estate Is Typical?

power of attorney liability
power of attorney liability
power of attorney liability
power of attorney liability

May 9, 2024

May 9, 2024

Power of Attorney Liability: Risks and Responsibilities

Power of Attorney Liability: Risks and Responsibilities

timeline for obtaining power of attorney
timeline for obtaining power of attorney
timeline for obtaining power of attorney
timeline for obtaining power of attorney

May 9, 2024

May 9, 2024

The Timeline for Obtaining Power of Attorney Explained

The Timeline for Obtaining Power of Attorney Explained

comprehensive guide to power of attorney responsibilities
comprehensive guide to power of attorney responsibilities
comprehensive guide to power of attorney responsibilities
comprehensive guide to power of attorney responsibilities

May 7, 2024

May 7, 2024

The Comprehensive Guide to Power of Attorney Responsibilities

The Comprehensive Guide to Power of Attorney Responsibilities

deceased's property
deceased's property
deceased's property
deceased's property

May 3, 2024

May 3, 2024

Deceased's Property: How Long Before It Must Change Names?

Deceased's Property: How Long Before It Must Change Names?

durable power of attorney
durable power of attorney
durable power of attorney
durable power of attorney

Apr 26, 2024

Apr 26, 2024

Durable Power of Attorney: What Powers Does It Grant?

Durable Power of Attorney: What Powers Does It Grant?

how to draft a power of attorney
how to draft a power of attorney
how to draft a power of attorney
how to draft a power of attorney

Apr 26, 2024

Apr 26, 2024

How to Draft a Power of Attorney: A Step-by-Step Guide

How to Draft a Power of Attorney: A Step-by-Step Guide

executor death
executor death
executor death
executor death

Apr 23, 2024

Apr 23, 2024

Executor's Death: The Next Steps for an Estate

Executor's Death: The Next Steps for an Estate

removing a deceased spouse from a deed
removing a deceased spouse from a deed
removing a deceased spouse from a deed
removing a deceased spouse from a deed

Apr 19, 2024

Apr 19, 2024

Removing a Deceased Spouse from a Deed: 5 Necessary Steps

Removing a Deceased Spouse from a Deed: 5 Necessary Steps

can a spouse change the deceased's will
can a spouse change the deceased's will
can a spouse change the deceased's will
can a spouse change the deceased's will

Apr 17, 2024

Apr 17, 2024

After Death: Can a Spouse Change the Deceased's Will?

After Death: Can a Spouse Change the Deceased's Will?

divorced spouse's rights to property after death explained
divorced spouse's rights to property after death explained
divorced spouse's rights to property after death explained
divorced spouse's rights to property after death explained

Apr 17, 2024

Apr 17, 2024

Divorced Spouse's Rights to Property After Death Explained

Divorced Spouse's Rights to Property After Death Explained

va disability and social security
va disability and social security
va disability and social security
va disability and social security

Apr 11, 2024

Apr 11, 2024

Navigating Dual Benefits: VA Disability and Social Security

Navigating Dual Benefits: VA Disability and Social Security

veteran benefit eligibility
veteran benefit eligibility
veteran benefit eligibility
veteran benefit eligibility

Apr 11, 2024

Apr 11, 2024

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

Veteran Benefit Eligibility: Understanding Denials and Exclusions

eligibility for veteran’s spouse benefits
eligibility for veteran’s spouse benefits
eligibility for veteran’s spouse benefits
eligibility for veteran’s spouse benefits

Apr 4, 2024

Apr 4, 2024

Eligibility for Veteran’s Spouse Benefits: What You Need to Know

Eligibility for Veteran’s Spouse Benefits: What You Need to Know

va disability payments
va disability payments
va disability payments
va disability payments

Apr 3, 2024

Apr 3, 2024

VA Disability Payments: Can They Be Discontinued?

VA Disability Payments: Can They Be Discontinued?

veteran death
veteran death
veteran death
veteran death

Mar 30, 2024

Mar 30, 2024

Veteran Death: Essential Actions and Checklist for Next of Kin

Veteran Death: Essential Actions and Checklist for Next of Kin

slats in estate planning
slats in estate planning
slats in estate planning
slats in estate planning

Mar 27, 2024

Mar 27, 2024

SLATs in Estate Planning: An Innovative Strategy Explained

SLATs in Estate Planning: An Innovative Strategy Explained

maximize your estate planning with survivorship life insurance
maximize your estate planning with survivorship life insurance
maximize your estate planning with survivorship life insurance
maximize your estate planning with survivorship life insurance

Mar 27, 2024

Mar 27, 2024

Maximize Your Estate Planning with Survivorship Life Insurance

Maximize Your Estate Planning with Survivorship Life Insurance

va benefits timeline
va benefits timeline
va benefits timeline
va benefits timeline

Mar 23, 2024

Mar 23, 2024

VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

VA Benefits Timeline: When They Stop After Death

is estate planning a legitimate business expense
is estate planning a legitimate business expense
is estate planning a legitimate business expense
is estate planning a legitimate business expense

Mar 20, 2024

Mar 20, 2024

Is Estate Planning a Legitimate Business Expense: Unveiling The Truth

Is Estate Planning a Legitimate Business Expense: Unveiling The Truth

does right of survivorship trump a will
does right of survivorship trump a will
does right of survivorship trump a will
does right of survivorship trump a will

Mar 15, 2024

Mar 15, 2024

Does Right of Survivorship Trump a Will: Legal Insights

Does Right of Survivorship Trump a Will: Legal Insights

palliative care at home
palliative care at home
palliative care at home
palliative care at home

Mar 13, 2024

Mar 13, 2024

Palliative Care at Home: Understanding Insurance Coverage

Palliative Care at Home: Understanding Insurance Coverage

navigating insurance coverage for hospice care
navigating insurance coverage for hospice care
navigating insurance coverage for hospice care
navigating insurance coverage for hospice care

Mar 13, 2024

Mar 13, 2024

Navigating Insurance Coverage for Hospice Care A Complete Guide

Navigating Insurance Coverage for Hospice Care A Complete Guide

choosing an estate planning attorney
choosing an estate planning attorney
choosing an estate planning attorney
choosing an estate planning attorney

Mar 9, 2024

Mar 9, 2024

Choosing an Estate Planning Attorney: Traits of Excellence

Choosing an Estate Planning Attorney: Traits of Excellence

can family overrule an advance directive
can family overrule an advance directive
can family overrule an advance directive
can family overrule an advance directive

Mar 7, 2024

Mar 7, 2024

Can Family Overrule an Advance Directive? What You Need to Know

Can Family Overrule an Advance Directive? What You Need to Know

funding hospice care in nursing homes
funding hospice care in nursing homes
funding hospice care in nursing homes
funding hospice care in nursing homes

Mar 7, 2024

Mar 7, 2024

Funding Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: Who Bears the Cost?

Funding Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: Who Bears the Cost?

who can legally witness an advance directive
who can legally witness an advance directive
who can legally witness an advance directive
who can legally witness an advance directive

Mar 5, 2024

Mar 5, 2024

Who Can Legally Witness an Advance Directive? Know Your Rights

Who Can Legally Witness an Advance Directive? Know Your Rights

exploring hospice care
exploring hospice care
exploring hospice care
exploring hospice care

Mar 5, 2024

Mar 5, 2024

Exploring Hospice Care: What’s Not Included?

Exploring Hospice Care: What’s Not Included?

respite care in hospice
respite care in hospice
respite care in hospice
respite care in hospice

Mar 5, 2024

Mar 5, 2024

Respite Care in Hospice: Providing Relief for Caregivers

Respite Care in Hospice: Providing Relief for Caregivers

different types of advance directives
different types of advance directives
different types of advance directives
different types of advance directives

Mar 5, 2024

Mar 5, 2024

Exploring the Spectrum: Different Types of Advance Directives

Exploring the Spectrum: Different Types of Advance Directives

deciding on hospice care
deciding on hospice care
deciding on hospice care
deciding on hospice care

Feb 28, 2024

Feb 28, 2024

Deciding on Hospice Care: Knowing When It's Time

Deciding on Hospice Care: Knowing When It's Time

hospice care duration
hospice care duration
hospice care duration
hospice care duration

Feb 27, 2024

Feb 27, 2024

Hospice Care Duration: How Long Can It Last?

Hospice Care Duration: How Long Can It Last?

hospice care timeline
hospice care timeline
hospice care timeline
hospice care timeline

Feb 27, 2024

Feb 27, 2024

Hospice Care Timeline: Estimating How Long to Live

Hospice Care Timeline: Estimating How Long to Live

doctor-ordered hospice care
doctor-ordered hospice care
doctor-ordered hospice care
doctor-ordered hospice care

Feb 22, 2024

Feb 22, 2024

Doctor-Ordered Hospice Care: When and Why It Happens

Doctor-Ordered Hospice Care: When and Why It Happens

funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline
funeral planning timeline

Feb 20, 2024

Feb 20, 2024

Funeral Planning Timeline: How Long Does it Really Take?

Funeral Planning Timeline: How Long Does it Really Take?

writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband
writing a heartfelt obituary for your husband

Feb 15, 2024

Feb 15, 2024

Writing a Heartfelt Obituary for Your Husband: Inspiring Examples

Writing a Heartfelt Obituary for Your Husband: Inspiring Examples

planning your funeral
planning your funeral
planning your funeral
planning your funeral

Feb 14, 2024

Feb 14, 2024

Planning Your Funeral: The Best Age To Start

Planning Your Funeral: The Best Age To Start

crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son
crafting a loving obituary for your son

Feb 14, 2024

Feb 14, 2024

Crafting a Loving Obituary For Your Son: Meaningful Examples

Crafting a Loving Obituary For Your Son: Meaningful Examples

improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors
improving communication between caregivers and doctors

Jan 18, 2024

Jan 18, 2024

Improving Communication Between Caregivers and Doctors

Improving Communication Between Caregivers and Doctors

copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate
copy of a death certificate

Nov 29, 2023

Nov 29, 2023

Can Anyone Get a Copy of a Death Certificate? Who Is Authorized?

Can Anyone Get a Copy of a Death Certificate? Who Is Authorized?

original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy
original death certificate vs. certified copy

Nov 25, 2023

Nov 25, 2023

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

Original Death Certificate vs. Certified Copy: Key Differences And Why They Matter

handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy
handle negative aspects of the deceased's life in a eulogy

Nov 25, 2023

Nov 25, 2023

How Do You Handle Negative Aspects of the Deceased's Life in a Eulogy?

How Do You Handle Negative Aspects of the Deceased's Life in a Eulogy?

more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral
more then one eulogy at a funeral

Nov 25, 2023

Nov 25, 2023

Can There Be More Then One Eulogy at a Funeral? Etiquette Explained

Can There Be More Then One Eulogy at a Funeral? Etiquette Explained

parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension
parent retirement pension

Nov 24, 2023

Nov 24, 2023

My Dad Died, Can I Get His Retirement Pension?

My Dad Died, Can I Get His Retirement Pension?

death certificate copies
death certificate copies
death certificate copies
death certificate copies

Nov 24, 2023

Nov 24, 2023

How Many Copies of a Death Certificate Should You Get?

How Many Copies of a Death Certificate Should You Get?

can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny
can a eulogy be funny

Nov 24, 2023

Nov 24, 2023

Can a Eulogy Be Funny? Yes, Here Are 10 Respectful but Funny Examples

Can a Eulogy Be Funny? Yes, Here Are 10 Respectful but Funny Examples

receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues
receive inheritance money without any issues

Nov 24, 2023

Nov 24, 2023

How Do You Receive Inheritance Money WITHOUT any issues?

How Do You Receive Inheritance Money WITHOUT any issues?

tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person
tax refund of a deceased person

Nov 17, 2023

Nov 17, 2023

Who Gets The Tax Refund of A Deceased Person? An Accountant Answers

Who Gets The Tax Refund of A Deceased Person? An Accountant Answers

how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy
how to start a eulogy

Nov 17, 2023

Nov 17, 2023

How To Start a Eulogy: 15 Heartfelt Examples

How To Start a Eulogy: 15 Heartfelt Examples

son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously
son talking to elder parents seriously

Nov 14, 2023

Nov 14, 2023

How To Discuss End-of-Life Care With Parents (Simple Guide)

How To Discuss End-of-Life Care With Parents (Simple Guide)

how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions
how to cancel a deceased person's subscriptions

Nov 14, 2023

Nov 14, 2023

How To Cancel a Deceased Person's Subscriptions the EASY Way

How To Cancel a Deceased Person's Subscriptions the EASY Way

what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy
what should you not put in a eulogy

Nov 8, 2023

Nov 8, 2023

What Should You Not Put in a Eulogy (9 Things To Avoid)

What Should You Not Put in a Eulogy (9 Things To Avoid)

how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will
how are estates distributed if there's no will

Nov 7, 2023

Nov 7, 2023

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

How Are Estates Distributed If There's No Will? A Lawyer Explains Intestate

microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template
microsoft word obituary template

Nov 6, 2023

Nov 6, 2023

Does Microsoft Word Have an Obituary Template?

Does Microsoft Word Have an Obituary Template?

how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook
how to post an obituary on facebook

Nov 6, 2023

Nov 6, 2023

How To Post an Obituary on Facebook: A Step-by-Step Guide

How To Post an Obituary on Facebook: A Step-by-Step Guide

death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process
death certificate for estate & probate process

Nov 6, 2023

Nov 6, 2023

Why Do You Need A Death Certificate For Estate & Probate Process?

Why Do You Need A Death Certificate For Estate & Probate Process?

correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate
correct errors on a death certificate

Nov 2, 2023

Nov 2, 2023

How Do I Correct Errors on a Death Certificate? And, How Long Does It Take?

How Do I Correct Errors on a Death Certificate? And, How Long Does It Take?

steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom
steps for writing a eulogy for mom

Nov 2, 2023

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps For Writing a Eulogy For Mom

12 Steps For Writing a Eulogy For Mom

steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad
steps for writing a eulogy for dad

Nov 2, 2023

Nov 2, 2023

12 Steps for Writing a Eulogy for Dad

12 Steps for Writing a Eulogy for Dad

who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies
who does the obituary when someone dies

Nov 1, 2023

Nov 1, 2023

Who Does The Obituary When Someone Dies?

Who Does The Obituary When Someone Dies?

Nov 1, 2023

Nov 1, 2023

How Late Is Too Late For An Obituary? 6 Steps To Take Today

How Late Is Too Late For An Obituary? 6 Steps To Take Today

how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost
how-much-does-obituary-cost

Nov 1, 2023

Nov 1, 2023

How Much Does It Cost To Publish An Obituary? Breaking It Down

How Much Does It Cost To Publish An Obituary? Breaking It Down

reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary
reasons you need an obituary

Nov 1, 2023

Nov 1, 2023

6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

6 Reasons You Need an Obituary (Plus 6 Reasons You Don't)

where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary
where do you post an obituary

Oct 30, 2023

Oct 30, 2023

Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

Where Do You Post an Obituary: A Step-By-Step Guide

obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note
obituary vs death note

Oct 30, 2023

Oct 30, 2023

Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

Obituary vs Death Note: What Are the Key Differences?

buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent
buying a house with elderly parent

Oct 5, 2023

Oct 5, 2023

Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

Buying A House With Elderly Parent: 10 Things To Know

trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents
trapped caring for elderly parents

Sep 14, 2023

Sep 14, 2023

I'm Trapped Caring for Elderly Parents

I'm Trapped Caring for Elderly Parents

401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors
401k and minors

Oct 5, 2023

Oct 5, 2023

401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

401(k) and Minors: Can a Minor be a Beneficiary?

How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k
How-to-Self-Direct-Your-401k

Sep 12, 2023

Sep 12, 2023

How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

How to Self-Direct Your 401(k): Take Control of Your Retirement

grandparents
grandparents
grandparents
grandparents

Aug 3, 2023

Aug 3, 2023

The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering and Simplifying Your Home as You Age

Aug 3, 2023

Aug 3, 2023

The Essential Guide to Preparing for Retirement

The Essential Guide to Preparing for Retirement

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Blended Families (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

Aug 3, 2023

Aug 3, 2023

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Physicians (Complete Guide)

are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents
are you legally responsible for your elderly parents

Jul 14, 2023

Jul 14, 2023

Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Are You Legally Responsible For Your Elderly Parents?

Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field
Multi-generational family walking through a field

Jun 7, 2023

Jun 7, 2023

How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

How To Travel With Elderly Parent: Here's How to Prepare

Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center
Retirement center

Jun 6, 2023

Jun 6, 2023

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Checklist For Moving A Parent To Assisted Living

Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son
Elderly parents with son

Jun 6, 2023

Jun 6, 2023

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

How to Set Up A Trust For An Elderly Parent: 6 Easy Steps

Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork
Daughter helping her mom review paperwork

Jun 6, 2023

Jun 6, 2023

How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

How To Stop Elderly Parents From Giving Money Away (9 Tips)

Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents
Elderly parents signing documents

Jun 6, 2023

Jun 6, 2023

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

Should Elderly Parents Sign Over Their House? Pros & Cons

A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer
A couple looking at their computer

May 17, 2023

May 17, 2023

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Estate Planning: A Comprehensive Guide

Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide
Helping elderly parents - the complete guide

May 2, 2023

May 2, 2023

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Helping Elderly Parents: The Complete Guide

Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion
Family seated on sofa having a discussion

May 1, 2023

May 1, 2023

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Trustworthy guide: How to organize your digital information

Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document
Person signing a document

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Can My Husband Make a Will Without My Knowledge?

Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders
Son on father's shoulders

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

What is a Last Will and Testament (also known as a Will)?

A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator
A couple looking at a document with a calculator

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Can A Wife Sell Deceased Husband's Property (6 Rules)

Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding
Paper shredding

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Should I Shred Documents Of A Deceased Person? (5 Tips)

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?
Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can I Change My Power of Attorney Without A Lawyer?

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)
Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Can You Have Two Power of Attorneys? (A Lawyer Answers)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)
Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Do Attorneys Keep Copies Of a Will? (4 Things To Know)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning for a Special Needs Child (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Childless Couples (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents
Estate Planning For Elderly Parents

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Elderly Parents (Complete Guide)

Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house
Woman talking with an advisor in a house

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For High Net Worth & Large Estates

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)
Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

Estate Planning For Irresponsible Children (Complete Guide)

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?
How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

How To Get Power of Attorney For Parent With Dementia?

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?
I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?

Apr 15, 2023

Apr 15, 2023

I Lost My Power of Attorney Papers, Now What?